City gets $7 million social housing boost from province

News Apr 01, 2016 by Matthew Van Dongen The Hamilton Spectator

The city's cash-strapped social housing agency will score the majority of a $7.17-million provincial funding infusion aimed at retrofitting aging apartment buildings.

Minister of Housing Ted McMeekin made the announcement at one the city's tallest and oldest buildings for seniors, a 24-storey apartment at 155 Park St. S., between Bold and Duke streets in central Hamilton.

It was one of five buildings highlighted by CityHousing Hamilton as in need of serious upgrades in its pitch for cash under the Social Housing Apartment Retrofit Program.

The housing services division has yet to decide how the program money will be doled out — both public and private agencies applied — but CityHousing is the largest local social housing provider and is expected to receive the lion's share of cash.

Re-cladding and insulating the 50-year-old Park Street South building would provide "tremendous savings" for the agency, said energy initiative co-ordinator Sean Botham.

"By building, it has the highest energy consumption for us and so obviously the highest potential for savings," he said, noting the drafty, poorly insulated building has 375 units heated by electric baseboards.

At the same time, going it alone on re-cladding the building would cost CityHousing more than $2 million, he said.

That's a big deal for an agency that already fell short by about $8 million on needed renovations to aging social housing complexes last year. It also has about 150 units too damaged to use — a painful problem for the list of 5,600 individuals and families waiting for an affordable place to live in Hamilton.

Hamilton accounts for around nine per cent of the total retrofit program fund announced in the provincial budget of $82 million.

Part of the aim of the fund is to provide savings to providers that can be invested in plans for new or expanded housing, said McMeekin, who is also a Hamilton MPP.

"Our vision is that everybody in Ontario — everyone in Ontario — has an affordable, stable and adequate place to call home," said the minister, adding the city should stay tuned for looming joint funding announcements from the province and federal government.

"There's more to come," he said.

Other CityHousing candidates for major retrofits like insulation, new boilers and windows include the 23-storey First Place, an 11-storey complex at 226 Rebecca, the 23-storey tower at 191 Main Street and the 23-storey downtown tower at 95 Hess.

mvandongen@thespec.com

905-526-3241 | @Mattatthespec

City gets $7 million social housing boost from province

News Apr 01, 2016 by Matthew Van Dongen The Hamilton Spectator

The city's cash-strapped social housing agency will score the majority of a $7.17-million provincial funding infusion aimed at retrofitting aging apartment buildings.

Minister of Housing Ted McMeekin made the announcement at one the city's tallest and oldest buildings for seniors, a 24-storey apartment at 155 Park St. S., between Bold and Duke streets in central Hamilton.

It was one of five buildings highlighted by CityHousing Hamilton as in need of serious upgrades in its pitch for cash under the Social Housing Apartment Retrofit Program.

The housing services division has yet to decide how the program money will be doled out — both public and private agencies applied — but CityHousing is the largest local social housing provider and is expected to receive the lion's share of cash.

Re-cladding and insulating the 50-year-old Park Street South building would provide "tremendous savings" for the agency, said energy initiative co-ordinator Sean Botham.

"By building, it has the highest energy consumption for us and so obviously the highest potential for savings," he said, noting the drafty, poorly insulated building has 375 units heated by electric baseboards.

At the same time, going it alone on re-cladding the building would cost CityHousing more than $2 million, he said.

That's a big deal for an agency that already fell short by about $8 million on needed renovations to aging social housing complexes last year. It also has about 150 units too damaged to use — a painful problem for the list of 5,600 individuals and families waiting for an affordable place to live in Hamilton.

Hamilton accounts for around nine per cent of the total retrofit program fund announced in the provincial budget of $82 million.

Part of the aim of the fund is to provide savings to providers that can be invested in plans for new or expanded housing, said McMeekin, who is also a Hamilton MPP.

"Our vision is that everybody in Ontario — everyone in Ontario — has an affordable, stable and adequate place to call home," said the minister, adding the city should stay tuned for looming joint funding announcements from the province and federal government.

"There's more to come," he said.

Other CityHousing candidates for major retrofits like insulation, new boilers and windows include the 23-storey First Place, an 11-storey complex at 226 Rebecca, the 23-storey tower at 191 Main Street and the 23-storey downtown tower at 95 Hess.

mvandongen@thespec.com

905-526-3241 | @Mattatthespec

City gets $7 million social housing boost from province

News Apr 01, 2016 by Matthew Van Dongen The Hamilton Spectator

The city's cash-strapped social housing agency will score the majority of a $7.17-million provincial funding infusion aimed at retrofitting aging apartment buildings.

Minister of Housing Ted McMeekin made the announcement at one the city's tallest and oldest buildings for seniors, a 24-storey apartment at 155 Park St. S., between Bold and Duke streets in central Hamilton.

It was one of five buildings highlighted by CityHousing Hamilton as in need of serious upgrades in its pitch for cash under the Social Housing Apartment Retrofit Program.

The housing services division has yet to decide how the program money will be doled out — both public and private agencies applied — but CityHousing is the largest local social housing provider and is expected to receive the lion's share of cash.

Re-cladding and insulating the 50-year-old Park Street South building would provide "tremendous savings" for the agency, said energy initiative co-ordinator Sean Botham.

"By building, it has the highest energy consumption for us and so obviously the highest potential for savings," he said, noting the drafty, poorly insulated building has 375 units heated by electric baseboards.

At the same time, going it alone on re-cladding the building would cost CityHousing more than $2 million, he said.

That's a big deal for an agency that already fell short by about $8 million on needed renovations to aging social housing complexes last year. It also has about 150 units too damaged to use — a painful problem for the list of 5,600 individuals and families waiting for an affordable place to live in Hamilton.

Hamilton accounts for around nine per cent of the total retrofit program fund announced in the provincial budget of $82 million.

Part of the aim of the fund is to provide savings to providers that can be invested in plans for new or expanded housing, said McMeekin, who is also a Hamilton MPP.

"Our vision is that everybody in Ontario — everyone in Ontario — has an affordable, stable and adequate place to call home," said the minister, adding the city should stay tuned for looming joint funding announcements from the province and federal government.

"There's more to come," he said.

Other CityHousing candidates for major retrofits like insulation, new boilers and windows include the 23-storey First Place, an 11-storey complex at 226 Rebecca, the 23-storey tower at 191 Main Street and the 23-storey downtown tower at 95 Hess.

mvandongen@thespec.com

905-526-3241 | @Mattatthespec