Old furniture gets new life in Freelton

News Mar 31, 2016 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

Every Wednesday morning, a group of retired or semi-retired residents come together in a dusty basement that smells of paint and primer.

Wearing grubby clothing, they set about their business with a common goal: to take old, worn-out furniture and give the pieces a facelift or repurpose them so it will sell at the Rescued and Restored store.

The Rejuvenators, as they call themselves, feel honoured to be a part of a worthy cause: all of the pieces that are getting restored and repurposed are headed for the sales floor. Once they’re sold, the profits will be donated to Drummond House – a transitional home for women and children start over after leaving abusive situations.

“What I do (is), I will take one of the people up from downstairs up with me and we’ll look for projects that need doing,” said Nick Vandooren, volunteer assistant manager and rejuvenator liaison.

This happens on a weekly basis and the members pick out pieces that may not be selling quickly, in an effort to move the product through.

Vandooren explained that pieces such as tables that are scratched or cabinets that have loose hinges will be sent down to the basement to be revamped.

Each volunteer brings a different set of skills to the projects they work on and even take art courses to get the best use out of their donated paint supplies.

Some of the members have a background in refinishing furniture, so the rest of the group members rely on them to sand out all the rough edges or rebuild pieces before they get painted and varnished.

“You learn from each person. Each person brings something different to the project,” said Carol Puri, one of the rejuvenators.

“I’ve continued to learn beyond the course,” she added, referring to art classes she along with Vicki Nemeth and Marlene O’Grady, started taking about three years ago.

She explained that because all the materials are donated, they needed to learn how to get the most out of the supplies.

Through the lessons, they were taught everything from how to use the paints and finishes and also how to properly clean the brushes.

“That’s why we’re doing courses to try to figure out what’s the best approach now and then how do we move in that direction,” added Puri.

In some cases, a couple of members will work on more than one of the pieces together. “Marlene and I are sharing (a set of tables) so we’ve had to co-ordinate because we paint differently, to try to get them to match as a pair,” she added.

All of the Rejuvenators said now that they are either retired or coming upon retirement, they feel the need to give back and take stock of the happy lives they have led.

“I like the idea that everything is donated here . . . and I think that the women’s shelter is a good idea. Could have been me or anybody else I know,” said Nemeth.

The group members work hard and take pride in their labour, conscious that the money made from each sale is going to a family that needs help.

“I felt very blessed that I had lots of things going well in my life and I figured it’s time for me to give back, plus I have three daughters . . . you think of your own kids,” said O’Grady.

Vandooren, who has been volunteering at the store for about five years, explained the store has taken on a new meaning in his life. He said that to give back to his community, continues to give him a great sense of satisfaction.

“I’ve always had a love for good causes and what Drummond House stood for, so I’ve been here and I come one day a week and I thoroughly enjoy myself being here,” he said.

According to Paul Parsons, the manager of the store and the only paid staff member, Rescued and Restored exists because of all the donations that poured into the transition home. “Wow, we have all of these good used quality furniture that people are willing to donate and people looked around and said, ‘You know, there isn’t any . . . outlets around for good used furniture, so why don’t we start this as a fundraiser,’” he said.

From there, it sparked a group to come together and donate their time, although the store is always looking for volunteers.

The Rejuvenators help each other and look forward to bringing their skills to the basement week after week to work on the various projects that lay scattered about the floor waiting to be given a fresh look.

Rescued and Restored isn’t Drummond House’s sole source of financial support; a number of local churches also provide funding. Parsons says the eventual goal is to have Drummond House completely funded by the furniture store.

“We’ve got an aggressive vision to grow sales here and to grow income here so that Drummond House can be much more self sufficient and do bigger and better things,” he said.

For more information or to volunteer, contact Rescued and Restored at 289-679-0481 or visit them on Facebook at Rescued & Restored.

Old furniture gets new life in Freelton

The Rejuvenators give worn out pieces a facelift for a good cause

News Mar 31, 2016 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

Every Wednesday morning, a group of retired or semi-retired residents come together in a dusty basement that smells of paint and primer.

Wearing grubby clothing, they set about their business with a common goal: to take old, worn-out furniture and give the pieces a facelift or repurpose them so it will sell at the Rescued and Restored store.

The Rejuvenators, as they call themselves, feel honoured to be a part of a worthy cause: all of the pieces that are getting restored and repurposed are headed for the sales floor. Once they’re sold, the profits will be donated to Drummond House – a transitional home for women and children start over after leaving abusive situations.

“What I do (is), I will take one of the people up from downstairs up with me and we’ll look for projects that need doing,” said Nick Vandooren, volunteer assistant manager and rejuvenator liaison.

This happens on a weekly basis and the members pick out pieces that may not be selling quickly, in an effort to move the product through.

Vandooren explained that pieces such as tables that are scratched or cabinets that have loose hinges will be sent down to the basement to be revamped.

Each volunteer brings a different set of skills to the projects they work on and even take art courses to get the best use out of their donated paint supplies.

Some of the members have a background in refinishing furniture, so the rest of the group members rely on them to sand out all the rough edges or rebuild pieces before they get painted and varnished.

“You learn from each person. Each person brings something different to the project,” said Carol Puri, one of the rejuvenators.

“I’ve continued to learn beyond the course,” she added, referring to art classes she along with Vicki Nemeth and Marlene O’Grady, started taking about three years ago.

She explained that because all the materials are donated, they needed to learn how to get the most out of the supplies.

Through the lessons, they were taught everything from how to use the paints and finishes and also how to properly clean the brushes.

“That’s why we’re doing courses to try to figure out what’s the best approach now and then how do we move in that direction,” added Puri.

In some cases, a couple of members will work on more than one of the pieces together. “Marlene and I are sharing (a set of tables) so we’ve had to co-ordinate because we paint differently, to try to get them to match as a pair,” she added.

All of the Rejuvenators said now that they are either retired or coming upon retirement, they feel the need to give back and take stock of the happy lives they have led.

“I like the idea that everything is donated here . . . and I think that the women’s shelter is a good idea. Could have been me or anybody else I know,” said Nemeth.

The group members work hard and take pride in their labour, conscious that the money made from each sale is going to a family that needs help.

“I felt very blessed that I had lots of things going well in my life and I figured it’s time for me to give back, plus I have three daughters . . . you think of your own kids,” said O’Grady.

Vandooren, who has been volunteering at the store for about five years, explained the store has taken on a new meaning in his life. He said that to give back to his community, continues to give him a great sense of satisfaction.

“I’ve always had a love for good causes and what Drummond House stood for, so I’ve been here and I come one day a week and I thoroughly enjoy myself being here,” he said.

According to Paul Parsons, the manager of the store and the only paid staff member, Rescued and Restored exists because of all the donations that poured into the transition home. “Wow, we have all of these good used quality furniture that people are willing to donate and people looked around and said, ‘You know, there isn’t any . . . outlets around for good used furniture, so why don’t we start this as a fundraiser,’” he said.

From there, it sparked a group to come together and donate their time, although the store is always looking for volunteers.

The Rejuvenators help each other and look forward to bringing their skills to the basement week after week to work on the various projects that lay scattered about the floor waiting to be given a fresh look.

Rescued and Restored isn’t Drummond House’s sole source of financial support; a number of local churches also provide funding. Parsons says the eventual goal is to have Drummond House completely funded by the furniture store.

“We’ve got an aggressive vision to grow sales here and to grow income here so that Drummond House can be much more self sufficient and do bigger and better things,” he said.

For more information or to volunteer, contact Rescued and Restored at 289-679-0481 or visit them on Facebook at Rescued & Restored.

Old furniture gets new life in Freelton

The Rejuvenators give worn out pieces a facelift for a good cause

News Mar 31, 2016 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

Every Wednesday morning, a group of retired or semi-retired residents come together in a dusty basement that smells of paint and primer.

Wearing grubby clothing, they set about their business with a common goal: to take old, worn-out furniture and give the pieces a facelift or repurpose them so it will sell at the Rescued and Restored store.

The Rejuvenators, as they call themselves, feel honoured to be a part of a worthy cause: all of the pieces that are getting restored and repurposed are headed for the sales floor. Once they’re sold, the profits will be donated to Drummond House – a transitional home for women and children start over after leaving abusive situations.

“What I do (is), I will take one of the people up from downstairs up with me and we’ll look for projects that need doing,” said Nick Vandooren, volunteer assistant manager and rejuvenator liaison.

This happens on a weekly basis and the members pick out pieces that may not be selling quickly, in an effort to move the product through.

Vandooren explained that pieces such as tables that are scratched or cabinets that have loose hinges will be sent down to the basement to be revamped.

Each volunteer brings a different set of skills to the projects they work on and even take art courses to get the best use out of their donated paint supplies.

Some of the members have a background in refinishing furniture, so the rest of the group members rely on them to sand out all the rough edges or rebuild pieces before they get painted and varnished.

“You learn from each person. Each person brings something different to the project,” said Carol Puri, one of the rejuvenators.

“I’ve continued to learn beyond the course,” she added, referring to art classes she along with Vicki Nemeth and Marlene O’Grady, started taking about three years ago.

She explained that because all the materials are donated, they needed to learn how to get the most out of the supplies.

Through the lessons, they were taught everything from how to use the paints and finishes and also how to properly clean the brushes.

“That’s why we’re doing courses to try to figure out what’s the best approach now and then how do we move in that direction,” added Puri.

In some cases, a couple of members will work on more than one of the pieces together. “Marlene and I are sharing (a set of tables) so we’ve had to co-ordinate because we paint differently, to try to get them to match as a pair,” she added.

All of the Rejuvenators said now that they are either retired or coming upon retirement, they feel the need to give back and take stock of the happy lives they have led.

“I like the idea that everything is donated here . . . and I think that the women’s shelter is a good idea. Could have been me or anybody else I know,” said Nemeth.

The group members work hard and take pride in their labour, conscious that the money made from each sale is going to a family that needs help.

“I felt very blessed that I had lots of things going well in my life and I figured it’s time for me to give back, plus I have three daughters . . . you think of your own kids,” said O’Grady.

Vandooren, who has been volunteering at the store for about five years, explained the store has taken on a new meaning in his life. He said that to give back to his community, continues to give him a great sense of satisfaction.

“I’ve always had a love for good causes and what Drummond House stood for, so I’ve been here and I come one day a week and I thoroughly enjoy myself being here,” he said.

According to Paul Parsons, the manager of the store and the only paid staff member, Rescued and Restored exists because of all the donations that poured into the transition home. “Wow, we have all of these good used quality furniture that people are willing to donate and people looked around and said, ‘You know, there isn’t any . . . outlets around for good used furniture, so why don’t we start this as a fundraiser,’” he said.

From there, it sparked a group to come together and donate their time, although the store is always looking for volunteers.

The Rejuvenators help each other and look forward to bringing their skills to the basement week after week to work on the various projects that lay scattered about the floor waiting to be given a fresh look.

Rescued and Restored isn’t Drummond House’s sole source of financial support; a number of local churches also provide funding. Parsons says the eventual goal is to have Drummond House completely funded by the furniture store.

“We’ve got an aggressive vision to grow sales here and to grow income here so that Drummond House can be much more self sufficient and do bigger and better things,” he said.

For more information or to volunteer, contact Rescued and Restored at 289-679-0481 or visit them on Facebook at Rescued & Restored.