Dognappers: Animal Control warns pet owners about imposters at work

News Apr 01, 2016 The Hamilton Spectator

If Fido is barking up a storm, that doesn't mean he gets sent to the pound.

The City of Hamilton Animal Services Facebook page warns it has received reports of someone in the area acting as an animal control officer and taking animals from their homes for alleged bylaw violations — such as excessive barking and leash laws.

Animal Services warns the public that an animal control officer will not take an animal for a bylaw violation, and will instead offer education, a warning, and/or lay a charge for a violation.

All Hamilton animal control officers must wear uniforms, have ID and a badge, and drive vehicles marked with a City of Hamilton logo.

A picture of a vehicle posted by Animal Services shows a white van, previously associated with suspicious behaviour in the Norfolk County area.

Norfolk County OPP Const. Ed Sanchuk told the Spectator he was aware of the photo circulating, but could not confirm whether this photo was connected to a suspicious vehicle spotted in Norfolk on Monday.

Monday morning, police in Norfolk County were informed that a resident had encountered a similar van — white, with tinted windows and rust on the bottom — in their driveway.

When the concerned homeowner went outside, the vehicle left the scene in the direction of Port Dover, said Sanchuk. "She looked around her house and saw that a bungee cord on her gate had been cut."

Though Sanchuk says there have been no reports of dognappings this year, there were three or four disappearances last year in Norfolk, with at least one being taken directly from a locked cage.

Remains of three dogs were found on the weekend in Norfolk County, which Sanchuk says "have been there for some time."

"I can't say if these incidents are related," he said, adding that the OPP is encouraging residents to be cautious and always ask for identification.

If anyone encounters someone they suspect of impersonating an Animal Services worker, they are encouraged to call Hamilton police with a description of the person and vehicle.

Dognappers: Animal Control warns pet owners about imposters at work

News Apr 01, 2016 The Hamilton Spectator

If Fido is barking up a storm, that doesn't mean he gets sent to the pound.

The City of Hamilton Animal Services Facebook page warns it has received reports of someone in the area acting as an animal control officer and taking animals from their homes for alleged bylaw violations — such as excessive barking and leash laws.

Animal Services warns the public that an animal control officer will not take an animal for a bylaw violation, and will instead offer education, a warning, and/or lay a charge for a violation.

All Hamilton animal control officers must wear uniforms, have ID and a badge, and drive vehicles marked with a City of Hamilton logo.

A picture of a vehicle posted by Animal Services shows a white van, previously associated with suspicious behaviour in the Norfolk County area.

Norfolk County OPP Const. Ed Sanchuk told the Spectator he was aware of the photo circulating, but could not confirm whether this photo was connected to a suspicious vehicle spotted in Norfolk on Monday.

Monday morning, police in Norfolk County were informed that a resident had encountered a similar van — white, with tinted windows and rust on the bottom — in their driveway.

When the concerned homeowner went outside, the vehicle left the scene in the direction of Port Dover, said Sanchuk. "She looked around her house and saw that a bungee cord on her gate had been cut."

Though Sanchuk says there have been no reports of dognappings this year, there were three or four disappearances last year in Norfolk, with at least one being taken directly from a locked cage.

Remains of three dogs were found on the weekend in Norfolk County, which Sanchuk says "have been there for some time."

"I can't say if these incidents are related," he said, adding that the OPP is encouraging residents to be cautious and always ask for identification.

If anyone encounters someone they suspect of impersonating an Animal Services worker, they are encouraged to call Hamilton police with a description of the person and vehicle.

Dognappers: Animal Control warns pet owners about imposters at work

News Apr 01, 2016 The Hamilton Spectator

If Fido is barking up a storm, that doesn't mean he gets sent to the pound.

The City of Hamilton Animal Services Facebook page warns it has received reports of someone in the area acting as an animal control officer and taking animals from their homes for alleged bylaw violations — such as excessive barking and leash laws.

Animal Services warns the public that an animal control officer will not take an animal for a bylaw violation, and will instead offer education, a warning, and/or lay a charge for a violation.

All Hamilton animal control officers must wear uniforms, have ID and a badge, and drive vehicles marked with a City of Hamilton logo.

A picture of a vehicle posted by Animal Services shows a white van, previously associated with suspicious behaviour in the Norfolk County area.

Norfolk County OPP Const. Ed Sanchuk told the Spectator he was aware of the photo circulating, but could not confirm whether this photo was connected to a suspicious vehicle spotted in Norfolk on Monday.

Monday morning, police in Norfolk County were informed that a resident had encountered a similar van — white, with tinted windows and rust on the bottom — in their driveway.

When the concerned homeowner went outside, the vehicle left the scene in the direction of Port Dover, said Sanchuk. "She looked around her house and saw that a bungee cord on her gate had been cut."

Though Sanchuk says there have been no reports of dognappings this year, there were three or four disappearances last year in Norfolk, with at least one being taken directly from a locked cage.

Remains of three dogs were found on the weekend in Norfolk County, which Sanchuk says "have been there for some time."

"I can't say if these incidents are related," he said, adding that the OPP is encouraging residents to be cautious and always ask for identification.

If anyone encounters someone they suspect of impersonating an Animal Services worker, they are encouraged to call Hamilton police with a description of the person and vehicle.