Ontario provides $7 million for energy retrofits to CityHousing Hamilton stock

News Apr 01, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Ontario government is providing over $7 million to CityHousing Hamilton that will go towards making affordable housing units energy efficient.

 “This is nothing to sneeze at,” said Ward 2 councillor Jason Farr, who is a board member of CityHousing Hamilton. “It’s a lot of money going to an area to improve the efficiencies that will help over time the bottom line.”

The March 31 announcement at 155 Park Street, a 24-storey CityHamilton Housing facility was made by Hamilton Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin and Mayor Fred Eisenberger. The $7.1 million funding, which McMeekin said will “flow almost immediately” comes from the $82 million the provincial Liberals announced in its 2016 budget as part of their Green Investment Fund.

Farr said CityHousing Hamilton will determine at its next board meeting where the money will be distributed.

The 24-storey Park Street South building, located behind City Hall, is one of a number of possible candidates for retrofitting. Other buildings include the 23-storey First Place on Rebecca Street, and the 23-storey facility at 95 Hess.

 Eisenberger said Hamilton spends about $8 million annually on repairs to the city’s affordable housing stock, but it still has a $100-million backlog. There are about 150 vacant units in need of repair.

Most of Ontario’s social housing buildings were constructed in the 1960s and 1970s, so retrofitting these facilities could provide up to 25 per cent more energy per square metre, said Liberal officials.

McMeekin said about 20 per cent of Ontario renters live in social housing.

Hamilton has a waiting list of about 5,600 people and families eager to move into a social housing unit.

“It will actually provide an opportunity for us to put units in a state of good repair,” said Eisenberger. “Yes, it will make a difference, but it is not the only answer. We will have to build more.”

Over the last six months affordable housing has become a municipal, provincial and national priority area. Locally, Eisenberger said the city is providing a total of $9.5 million into improving affordable housing in this year’s budget. And Ward 5 councillor Chad Collins, president of the CityHamilton Housing board has found about $3 million in additional dollars.

McMeekin, minister of housing, will be introducing before the Ontario Legislature recesses June 9 what he is calling a “bold” and “transformative” long-term housing strategy that sets a target of eliminating homelessness by 2025. The legislation includes allowing municipalities to adopt inclusionary zoning and identifies a percentage of a residential development for affordable housing.

“I’m sure this council will adopt inclusionary zoning wholeheartedly,” said Eisenberger, a proponent of the planning measure. “We will (then) be able to provide a housing mix in our community I think our community needs and want and deserve.”

McMeekin also promised further funding of about $160 million from both the Ontario and federal governments for affordable housing in cooperation.

“There’s more to come,” he said.

 

Ontario provides $7 million for energy retrofits to CityHousing Hamilton stock

News Apr 01, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Ontario government is providing over $7 million to CityHousing Hamilton that will go towards making affordable housing units energy efficient.

 “This is nothing to sneeze at,” said Ward 2 councillor Jason Farr, who is a board member of CityHousing Hamilton. “It’s a lot of money going to an area to improve the efficiencies that will help over time the bottom line.”

The March 31 announcement at 155 Park Street, a 24-storey CityHamilton Housing facility was made by Hamilton Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin and Mayor Fred Eisenberger. The $7.1 million funding, which McMeekin said will “flow almost immediately” comes from the $82 million the provincial Liberals announced in its 2016 budget as part of their Green Investment Fund.

Farr said CityHousing Hamilton will determine at its next board meeting where the money will be distributed.

The 24-storey Park Street South building, located behind City Hall, is one of a number of possible candidates for retrofitting. Other buildings include the 23-storey First Place on Rebecca Street, and the 23-storey facility at 95 Hess.

 Eisenberger said Hamilton spends about $8 million annually on repairs to the city’s affordable housing stock, but it still has a $100-million backlog. There are about 150 vacant units in need of repair.

Most of Ontario’s social housing buildings were constructed in the 1960s and 1970s, so retrofitting these facilities could provide up to 25 per cent more energy per square metre, said Liberal officials.

McMeekin said about 20 per cent of Ontario renters live in social housing.

Hamilton has a waiting list of about 5,600 people and families eager to move into a social housing unit.

“It will actually provide an opportunity for us to put units in a state of good repair,” said Eisenberger. “Yes, it will make a difference, but it is not the only answer. We will have to build more.”

Over the last six months affordable housing has become a municipal, provincial and national priority area. Locally, Eisenberger said the city is providing a total of $9.5 million into improving affordable housing in this year’s budget. And Ward 5 councillor Chad Collins, president of the CityHamilton Housing board has found about $3 million in additional dollars.

McMeekin, minister of housing, will be introducing before the Ontario Legislature recesses June 9 what he is calling a “bold” and “transformative” long-term housing strategy that sets a target of eliminating homelessness by 2025. The legislation includes allowing municipalities to adopt inclusionary zoning and identifies a percentage of a residential development for affordable housing.

“I’m sure this council will adopt inclusionary zoning wholeheartedly,” said Eisenberger, a proponent of the planning measure. “We will (then) be able to provide a housing mix in our community I think our community needs and want and deserve.”

McMeekin also promised further funding of about $160 million from both the Ontario and federal governments for affordable housing in cooperation.

“There’s more to come,” he said.

 

Ontario provides $7 million for energy retrofits to CityHousing Hamilton stock

News Apr 01, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

The Ontario government is providing over $7 million to CityHousing Hamilton that will go towards making affordable housing units energy efficient.

 “This is nothing to sneeze at,” said Ward 2 councillor Jason Farr, who is a board member of CityHousing Hamilton. “It’s a lot of money going to an area to improve the efficiencies that will help over time the bottom line.”

The March 31 announcement at 155 Park Street, a 24-storey CityHamilton Housing facility was made by Hamilton Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin and Mayor Fred Eisenberger. The $7.1 million funding, which McMeekin said will “flow almost immediately” comes from the $82 million the provincial Liberals announced in its 2016 budget as part of their Green Investment Fund.

Farr said CityHousing Hamilton will determine at its next board meeting where the money will be distributed.

The 24-storey Park Street South building, located behind City Hall, is one of a number of possible candidates for retrofitting. Other buildings include the 23-storey First Place on Rebecca Street, and the 23-storey facility at 95 Hess.

 Eisenberger said Hamilton spends about $8 million annually on repairs to the city’s affordable housing stock, but it still has a $100-million backlog. There are about 150 vacant units in need of repair.

Most of Ontario’s social housing buildings were constructed in the 1960s and 1970s, so retrofitting these facilities could provide up to 25 per cent more energy per square metre, said Liberal officials.

McMeekin said about 20 per cent of Ontario renters live in social housing.

Hamilton has a waiting list of about 5,600 people and families eager to move into a social housing unit.

“It will actually provide an opportunity for us to put units in a state of good repair,” said Eisenberger. “Yes, it will make a difference, but it is not the only answer. We will have to build more.”

Over the last six months affordable housing has become a municipal, provincial and national priority area. Locally, Eisenberger said the city is providing a total of $9.5 million into improving affordable housing in this year’s budget. And Ward 5 councillor Chad Collins, president of the CityHamilton Housing board has found about $3 million in additional dollars.

McMeekin, minister of housing, will be introducing before the Ontario Legislature recesses June 9 what he is calling a “bold” and “transformative” long-term housing strategy that sets a target of eliminating homelessness by 2025. The legislation includes allowing municipalities to adopt inclusionary zoning and identifies a percentage of a residential development for affordable housing.

“I’m sure this council will adopt inclusionary zoning wholeheartedly,” said Eisenberger, a proponent of the planning measure. “We will (then) be able to provide a housing mix in our community I think our community needs and want and deserve.”

McMeekin also promised further funding of about $160 million from both the Ontario and federal governments for affordable housing in cooperation.

“There’s more to come,” he said.