Hey, I thought it was supposed to be spring!

News Apr 01, 2016 by Mark McNeil The Hamilton Spectator

After a winter that often looked like spring, we're heading into a spring that looks a lot like winter.

So buck up for a slap of the old frosty Sunday and into early next week as temperatures will be several degrees lower than they are supposed to be at this time of year.

"It will be a rude awakening or a reality check about where we live," says Dave Phillips, a senior climatologist at Environment Canada.

"It will be shock to people who have been seduced into thinking that winter in all its disguises has generally avoided us."

Phillips says Hamilton's winter was one of the warmest and snowless on record.

"You should be excited that you just set an all-time record for warmest winter on record, at least back to 1955," he said.

Factoring all the high and low temperatures from November to March, the average comes in at 1.2 C, about 3 degrees higher than normal.

Hamilton had 74 centimetres of snow over those five months when we would normally get 150, he said, "so, there wasn't a lot of shovelling, plowing and pushing.

"It really didn't look or feel like winter very often and when it did, it didn't last very long," Phillips said.

Tys Theysmeyer, head of natural lands for the Royal Botanical Gardens, says spring seems on schedule for flora and fauna. Plants are getting ready to bud and migrating birds are starting to make their way back.

The only thing he has noticed that is ahead of schedule is spawning trout in Spencer Creek.

One strong sign of spring, though, is Theysmeyer and a crew of volunteers are scheduled to take on a major stream restoration planting Saturday at a property recently acquired by the RBG for conservation.

It's located just below the Niagara Escarpment north of Cootes Paradise.

mmcneil@thespec.com

905-526-4687 | @Markatthespec

Hey, I thought it was supposed to be spring!

News Apr 01, 2016 by Mark McNeil The Hamilton Spectator

After a winter that often looked like spring, we're heading into a spring that looks a lot like winter.

So buck up for a slap of the old frosty Sunday and into early next week as temperatures will be several degrees lower than they are supposed to be at this time of year.

"It will be a rude awakening or a reality check about where we live," says Dave Phillips, a senior climatologist at Environment Canada.

"It will be shock to people who have been seduced into thinking that winter in all its disguises has generally avoided us."

Phillips says Hamilton's winter was one of the warmest and snowless on record.

"You should be excited that you just set an all-time record for warmest winter on record, at least back to 1955," he said.

Factoring all the high and low temperatures from November to March, the average comes in at 1.2 C, about 3 degrees higher than normal.

Hamilton had 74 centimetres of snow over those five months when we would normally get 150, he said, "so, there wasn't a lot of shovelling, plowing and pushing.

"It really didn't look or feel like winter very often and when it did, it didn't last very long," Phillips said.

Tys Theysmeyer, head of natural lands for the Royal Botanical Gardens, says spring seems on schedule for flora and fauna. Plants are getting ready to bud and migrating birds are starting to make their way back.

The only thing he has noticed that is ahead of schedule is spawning trout in Spencer Creek.

One strong sign of spring, though, is Theysmeyer and a crew of volunteers are scheduled to take on a major stream restoration planting Saturday at a property recently acquired by the RBG for conservation.

It's located just below the Niagara Escarpment north of Cootes Paradise.

mmcneil@thespec.com

905-526-4687 | @Markatthespec

Hey, I thought it was supposed to be spring!

News Apr 01, 2016 by Mark McNeil The Hamilton Spectator

After a winter that often looked like spring, we're heading into a spring that looks a lot like winter.

So buck up for a slap of the old frosty Sunday and into early next week as temperatures will be several degrees lower than they are supposed to be at this time of year.

"It will be a rude awakening or a reality check about where we live," says Dave Phillips, a senior climatologist at Environment Canada.

"It will be shock to people who have been seduced into thinking that winter in all its disguises has generally avoided us."

Phillips says Hamilton's winter was one of the warmest and snowless on record.

"You should be excited that you just set an all-time record for warmest winter on record, at least back to 1955," he said.

Factoring all the high and low temperatures from November to March, the average comes in at 1.2 C, about 3 degrees higher than normal.

Hamilton had 74 centimetres of snow over those five months when we would normally get 150, he said, "so, there wasn't a lot of shovelling, plowing and pushing.

"It really didn't look or feel like winter very often and when it did, it didn't last very long," Phillips said.

Tys Theysmeyer, head of natural lands for the Royal Botanical Gardens, says spring seems on schedule for flora and fauna. Plants are getting ready to bud and migrating birds are starting to make their way back.

The only thing he has noticed that is ahead of schedule is spawning trout in Spencer Creek.

One strong sign of spring, though, is Theysmeyer and a crew of volunteers are scheduled to take on a major stream restoration planting Saturday at a property recently acquired by the RBG for conservation.

It's located just below the Niagara Escarpment north of Cootes Paradise.

mmcneil@thespec.com

905-526-4687 | @Markatthespec