Bosma trial: Mechanic accused of lying for boss Dellen Millard

News Apr 05, 2016 by Molly Hayes The Hamilton Spectator

Dellen Millard's mechanic was willing to turn a blind eye — and lie — for his boss, Mark Smich's lawyer says.

Shane Schlatman didn't ask questions when random vehicles showed up at the Millardair hangar — even after he learned one of them belonged to missing man Tim Bosma.

"You didn't see anything, you didn't hear anything, and you don't want to tell anything," Thomas Dungey suggested Monday during cross-examination of the former Millardair mechanic.

Millard, 30, and Smich, 28, are co-accused in the death of Tim Bosma, who disappeared May 6, 2013 after taking two men for a test drive in his truck.

The Crown says Bosma was shot in his truck, his body then incinerated in an animal cremator outside the Millardair hangar at the Waterloo Region airport in the early hours of May 7, 2013.

Schlatman has testified previously that he and Millard were not that close and that he'd have no reason to lie on the stand. But Dungey grilled him Monday about their close friendship and his cushy gig at Millardair.

Schlatman agreed that throughout the time he knew Millard, "don't question anything" was his attitude.

He was making 10 dollars more per hour at Millardair — where he said he mainly worked on Millard's hobby cars — compared to the garage Millard had poached him from. He got to tag along on a trip to Baja, Mexico for a desert race that had nothing to do with the company. The pair had even talked about building dream homes together on Millard's Ayr farm.

This, Dungey says, was why Schlatman did not call police after discovering a stripped black pickup truck in the hangar on May 8. Or on May 9, after learning it was Bosma's truck. Or on May 10, after the truck had disappeared.

Schlatman initially denied having talked to Millard the night of May 9, after his father-in-law told him he had gone to Crime Stoppers, and before the truck disappeared. Eventually Schlatman said he "might have" talked to him.

"Your loyalty is so great, to hell with Bosma," Dungey suggested.

But Schlatman insisted Millard told him he had done nothing wrong — and that he believed him. He assumed Millard had bought a stolen truck.

"The Dell I know wouldn't be involved in something like this," he argued.

Because he believed his boss was a "rich guy," he didn't question when new vehicles appeared overnight, Schlatman testified.

There may have been other stolen vehicles in the hangar, Dungey elicited from him. Schlatman says police had questioned him about a Bobcat and a Harley-Davidson motorcycle they said were stolen.

Schlatman testified that he did not know where those vehicles had come from. He recalled that Millard had asked him to remove a GPS tracking device off the Bobcat, but that he did not ask any questions. He never asked questions.

"Whatever Dell wants, Dell gets," Dungey suggested.

"Yes sir," Schlatman said.

On May 10, 2013 after a visit to the hangar by police, Millard asked Schlatman to help him move his red pickup truck off the property. He did, but when police later asked him about it, he played dumb, court heard.

It was only after police cautioned him, Dungey argued, that he told him where it was.

"So it's not because you were aiding the police," Dungey said.

No, Schlatman agreed, he was trying to protect himself.

Dungey suggested it was actually Millard he was trying to protect.

After Schlatman wrapped up on the stand Monday, the jury heard from Jennifer Plath, a gun expert from the Centre of Forensic Sciences. She testified that the .380-calibre casing found in Bosma's truck could have been fired from a Walther PPK pistol — the type of gun Dellen Millard is seen holding in a photo the jury has seen.

However, Plath cautioned that without physically examining the gun in the photo (none was ever recovered in this case), she could not say if it was real.

Firearm Analysis by The Hamilton Spectator

mhayes@thespec.com

905-526-3214 | @mollyhayes

Bosma trial: Mechanic accused of lying for boss Dellen Millard

News Apr 05, 2016 by Molly Hayes The Hamilton Spectator

Dellen Millard's mechanic was willing to turn a blind eye — and lie — for his boss, Mark Smich's lawyer says.

Shane Schlatman didn't ask questions when random vehicles showed up at the Millardair hangar — even after he learned one of them belonged to missing man Tim Bosma.

"You didn't see anything, you didn't hear anything, and you don't want to tell anything," Thomas Dungey suggested Monday during cross-examination of the former Millardair mechanic.

Millard, 30, and Smich, 28, are co-accused in the death of Tim Bosma, who disappeared May 6, 2013 after taking two men for a test drive in his truck.

The Crown says Bosma was shot in his truck, his body then incinerated in an animal cremator outside the Millardair hangar at the Waterloo Region airport in the early hours of May 7, 2013.

Schlatman has testified previously that he and Millard were not that close and that he'd have no reason to lie on the stand. But Dungey grilled him Monday about their close friendship and his cushy gig at Millardair.

Schlatman agreed that throughout the time he knew Millard, "don't question anything" was his attitude.

He was making 10 dollars more per hour at Millardair — where he said he mainly worked on Millard's hobby cars — compared to the garage Millard had poached him from. He got to tag along on a trip to Baja, Mexico for a desert race that had nothing to do with the company. The pair had even talked about building dream homes together on Millard's Ayr farm.

This, Dungey says, was why Schlatman did not call police after discovering a stripped black pickup truck in the hangar on May 8. Or on May 9, after learning it was Bosma's truck. Or on May 10, after the truck had disappeared.

Schlatman initially denied having talked to Millard the night of May 9, after his father-in-law told him he had gone to Crime Stoppers, and before the truck disappeared. Eventually Schlatman said he "might have" talked to him.

"Your loyalty is so great, to hell with Bosma," Dungey suggested.

But Schlatman insisted Millard told him he had done nothing wrong — and that he believed him. He assumed Millard had bought a stolen truck.

"The Dell I know wouldn't be involved in something like this," he argued.

Because he believed his boss was a "rich guy," he didn't question when new vehicles appeared overnight, Schlatman testified.

There may have been other stolen vehicles in the hangar, Dungey elicited from him. Schlatman says police had questioned him about a Bobcat and a Harley-Davidson motorcycle they said were stolen.

Schlatman testified that he did not know where those vehicles had come from. He recalled that Millard had asked him to remove a GPS tracking device off the Bobcat, but that he did not ask any questions. He never asked questions.

"Whatever Dell wants, Dell gets," Dungey suggested.

"Yes sir," Schlatman said.

On May 10, 2013 after a visit to the hangar by police, Millard asked Schlatman to help him move his red pickup truck off the property. He did, but when police later asked him about it, he played dumb, court heard.

It was only after police cautioned him, Dungey argued, that he told him where it was.

"So it's not because you were aiding the police," Dungey said.

No, Schlatman agreed, he was trying to protect himself.

Dungey suggested it was actually Millard he was trying to protect.

After Schlatman wrapped up on the stand Monday, the jury heard from Jennifer Plath, a gun expert from the Centre of Forensic Sciences. She testified that the .380-calibre casing found in Bosma's truck could have been fired from a Walther PPK pistol — the type of gun Dellen Millard is seen holding in a photo the jury has seen.

However, Plath cautioned that without physically examining the gun in the photo (none was ever recovered in this case), she could not say if it was real.

Firearm Analysis by The Hamilton Spectator

mhayes@thespec.com

905-526-3214 | @mollyhayes

Bosma trial: Mechanic accused of lying for boss Dellen Millard

News Apr 05, 2016 by Molly Hayes The Hamilton Spectator

Dellen Millard's mechanic was willing to turn a blind eye — and lie — for his boss, Mark Smich's lawyer says.

Shane Schlatman didn't ask questions when random vehicles showed up at the Millardair hangar — even after he learned one of them belonged to missing man Tim Bosma.

"You didn't see anything, you didn't hear anything, and you don't want to tell anything," Thomas Dungey suggested Monday during cross-examination of the former Millardair mechanic.

Millard, 30, and Smich, 28, are co-accused in the death of Tim Bosma, who disappeared May 6, 2013 after taking two men for a test drive in his truck.

The Crown says Bosma was shot in his truck, his body then incinerated in an animal cremator outside the Millardair hangar at the Waterloo Region airport in the early hours of May 7, 2013.

Schlatman has testified previously that he and Millard were not that close and that he'd have no reason to lie on the stand. But Dungey grilled him Monday about their close friendship and his cushy gig at Millardair.

Schlatman agreed that throughout the time he knew Millard, "don't question anything" was his attitude.

He was making 10 dollars more per hour at Millardair — where he said he mainly worked on Millard's hobby cars — compared to the garage Millard had poached him from. He got to tag along on a trip to Baja, Mexico for a desert race that had nothing to do with the company. The pair had even talked about building dream homes together on Millard's Ayr farm.

This, Dungey says, was why Schlatman did not call police after discovering a stripped black pickup truck in the hangar on May 8. Or on May 9, after learning it was Bosma's truck. Or on May 10, after the truck had disappeared.

Schlatman initially denied having talked to Millard the night of May 9, after his father-in-law told him he had gone to Crime Stoppers, and before the truck disappeared. Eventually Schlatman said he "might have" talked to him.

"Your loyalty is so great, to hell with Bosma," Dungey suggested.

But Schlatman insisted Millard told him he had done nothing wrong — and that he believed him. He assumed Millard had bought a stolen truck.

"The Dell I know wouldn't be involved in something like this," he argued.

Because he believed his boss was a "rich guy," he didn't question when new vehicles appeared overnight, Schlatman testified.

There may have been other stolen vehicles in the hangar, Dungey elicited from him. Schlatman says police had questioned him about a Bobcat and a Harley-Davidson motorcycle they said were stolen.

Schlatman testified that he did not know where those vehicles had come from. He recalled that Millard had asked him to remove a GPS tracking device off the Bobcat, but that he did not ask any questions. He never asked questions.

"Whatever Dell wants, Dell gets," Dungey suggested.

"Yes sir," Schlatman said.

On May 10, 2013 after a visit to the hangar by police, Millard asked Schlatman to help him move his red pickup truck off the property. He did, but when police later asked him about it, he played dumb, court heard.

It was only after police cautioned him, Dungey argued, that he told him where it was.

"So it's not because you were aiding the police," Dungey said.

No, Schlatman agreed, he was trying to protect himself.

Dungey suggested it was actually Millard he was trying to protect.

After Schlatman wrapped up on the stand Monday, the jury heard from Jennifer Plath, a gun expert from the Centre of Forensic Sciences. She testified that the .380-calibre casing found in Bosma's truck could have been fired from a Walther PPK pistol — the type of gun Dellen Millard is seen holding in a photo the jury has seen.

However, Plath cautioned that without physically examining the gun in the photo (none was ever recovered in this case), she could not say if it was real.

Firearm Analysis by The Hamilton Spectator

mhayes@thespec.com

905-526-3214 | @mollyhayes