Roadkill: Young turtles still dying too often in Dundas

News Apr 05, 2016 by Matthew Van Dongen The Hamilton Spectator

Turtle road kill was recorded close to 100 times around Cootes Drive last year despite new fencing designed to protect the slow-moving travelers.

But the fence near the Spencer Creek bridge did seem to help prevent death for both adult turtles and deer, said Tys Theysmeyer, head of natural lands at Royal Botanical Gardens.

Plans are also afoot to protect smaller pedestrian plodders.

"There definitely seemed to be fewer adults killed compared to the previous year, partly due to the fence but also because of the good work of local turtle watchers," said Theysmeyer, referencing members of Dundas Turtle Watch, who are seeking new volunteers for the spring.

"We do have more work to do for hatchlings, certainly."

Of the 93 turtles recorded as run over in 2015, mostly on Cootes Drive and Olympic Drive, all but four were hatchlings, he said. By comparison, more than a dozen recorded road-kill deaths were adult turtles in 2014.

Theysmeyer outlined hopes for an eventual "small animal" one-way fence to line more of Cootes or Olmypic drive that would allow turtles, snakes and frogs to move off the road –but not back on.

Amphibians like frogs (57) were the next most commonly recorded road death in the area last year.

He said a committee of volunteers, RBG officials and city staffers are still discussing ideas like speed reduction, water quality improvements and the possible relocation of a community garden from a popular nesting area.

The RBG will continue to radio-track rare Blandings turtles, protect nesting sites and even help hatch turtles when needed, he said.

For information about Dundas Turtle Watch, visit dundasturtlewatch.wordpress.com or call 905-627-8917.

Roadkill: Young turtles still dying too often in Dundas

News Apr 05, 2016 by Matthew Van Dongen The Hamilton Spectator

Turtle road kill was recorded close to 100 times around Cootes Drive last year despite new fencing designed to protect the slow-moving travelers.

But the fence near the Spencer Creek bridge did seem to help prevent death for both adult turtles and deer, said Tys Theysmeyer, head of natural lands at Royal Botanical Gardens.

Plans are also afoot to protect smaller pedestrian plodders.

"There definitely seemed to be fewer adults killed compared to the previous year, partly due to the fence but also because of the good work of local turtle watchers," said Theysmeyer, referencing members of Dundas Turtle Watch, who are seeking new volunteers for the spring.

"We do have more work to do for hatchlings, certainly."

Of the 93 turtles recorded as run over in 2015, mostly on Cootes Drive and Olympic Drive, all but four were hatchlings, he said. By comparison, more than a dozen recorded road-kill deaths were adult turtles in 2014.

Theysmeyer outlined hopes for an eventual "small animal" one-way fence to line more of Cootes or Olmypic drive that would allow turtles, snakes and frogs to move off the road –but not back on.

Amphibians like frogs (57) were the next most commonly recorded road death in the area last year.

He said a committee of volunteers, RBG officials and city staffers are still discussing ideas like speed reduction, water quality improvements and the possible relocation of a community garden from a popular nesting area.

The RBG will continue to radio-track rare Blandings turtles, protect nesting sites and even help hatch turtles when needed, he said.

For information about Dundas Turtle Watch, visit dundasturtlewatch.wordpress.com or call 905-627-8917.

Roadkill: Young turtles still dying too often in Dundas

News Apr 05, 2016 by Matthew Van Dongen The Hamilton Spectator

Turtle road kill was recorded close to 100 times around Cootes Drive last year despite new fencing designed to protect the slow-moving travelers.

But the fence near the Spencer Creek bridge did seem to help prevent death for both adult turtles and deer, said Tys Theysmeyer, head of natural lands at Royal Botanical Gardens.

Plans are also afoot to protect smaller pedestrian plodders.

"There definitely seemed to be fewer adults killed compared to the previous year, partly due to the fence but also because of the good work of local turtle watchers," said Theysmeyer, referencing members of Dundas Turtle Watch, who are seeking new volunteers for the spring.

"We do have more work to do for hatchlings, certainly."

Of the 93 turtles recorded as run over in 2015, mostly on Cootes Drive and Olympic Drive, all but four were hatchlings, he said. By comparison, more than a dozen recorded road-kill deaths were adult turtles in 2014.

Theysmeyer outlined hopes for an eventual "small animal" one-way fence to line more of Cootes or Olmypic drive that would allow turtles, snakes and frogs to move off the road –but not back on.

Amphibians like frogs (57) were the next most commonly recorded road death in the area last year.

He said a committee of volunteers, RBG officials and city staffers are still discussing ideas like speed reduction, water quality improvements and the possible relocation of a community garden from a popular nesting area.

The RBG will continue to radio-track rare Blandings turtles, protect nesting sites and even help hatch turtles when needed, he said.

For information about Dundas Turtle Watch, visit dundasturtlewatch.wordpress.com or call 905-627-8917.