Tackling health care through innovation; Mac students told of opportunities in Hamilton

News Apr 04, 2016 by Natalie Paddon The Hamilton Spectator

Innovation is the only way to meet the upcoming demands of an aging population, an IBM senior executive told a group of engineering students Monday night.

IBM Canada's Ross Rosier highlighted figures like Ontario's $52-billion health care budget, and the fact that almost half of that goes to support people age 65 and older.

In 20 years, the population of seniors is expected to double, he said.

"The only solution to that is innovation in health care," Rosier during his talk at the Hamilton Public Library. "There's a tremendous business opportunity and a tremendous need for innovation to fix that problem."

Rosier was the guest speaker at McMaster University's W. Booth School of Engineering Practice's Innovation Studio Community Check-In, held to showcase projects in development by graduate students in the program.

Rosier, project executive for IBM-Collaborative Innovation Centre, is responsible for "opening up," "initiating" and getting the collaboration centre with Hamilton Health Sciences "moving," he said.

Announced in March, the partnership between IBM Canada and Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation will bring as many as 400 jobs into the downtown core and boost Hamilton's economy when it comes to health care and intellectual property. Plans are to have it opened up by the end of the third quarter in 2016, with a virtual centre expected to be operational sooner, he said.

David Potter, an associate professor in the school, said the school brings in community members so students can discover problems and opportunities where they can add value in the real world.

Events like the one held Monday are an opportunity to hear what the students came up with as a way to tackle those challenges.

"Some of these collaborations will turn into businesses that stay in Hamilton and contribute to the economy here," Potter said. "Some of the projects will become just a learning experience but those students will stay in Hamilton and work for businesses in Hamilton and bring that skill set to the companies that hire them in Hamilton."

Presentations Monday night were expected to touch on topics including energy recovery alternatives in steel making and the company FISH Technologies (Farming Innovations and Sustainable Horticulture), which was recently awarded $20,000 through McMaster's on-campus entrepreneurship initiative, Spectrum.

Rosier said he was invited to speak at the event because of the similarities between the goals of the W. Booth School and those of the innovation centre.

"As they're thinking about projects and engaging with the community … think about areas that might affect the prevention of disease," he said in an interview. "How do I keep people from not coming into the health care system? How do I deal with health at home? Prevent it? Treat it?"

npaddon@thespec.com

905-526-2420 | @NatatTheSpec

Tackling health care through innovation; Mac students told of opportunities in Hamilton

News Apr 04, 2016 by Natalie Paddon The Hamilton Spectator

Innovation is the only way to meet the upcoming demands of an aging population, an IBM senior executive told a group of engineering students Monday night.

IBM Canada's Ross Rosier highlighted figures like Ontario's $52-billion health care budget, and the fact that almost half of that goes to support people age 65 and older.

In 20 years, the population of seniors is expected to double, he said.

"The only solution to that is innovation in health care," Rosier during his talk at the Hamilton Public Library. "There's a tremendous business opportunity and a tremendous need for innovation to fix that problem."

Rosier was the guest speaker at McMaster University's W. Booth School of Engineering Practice's Innovation Studio Community Check-In, held to showcase projects in development by graduate students in the program.

Rosier, project executive for IBM-Collaborative Innovation Centre, is responsible for "opening up," "initiating" and getting the collaboration centre with Hamilton Health Sciences "moving," he said.

Announced in March, the partnership between IBM Canada and Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation will bring as many as 400 jobs into the downtown core and boost Hamilton's economy when it comes to health care and intellectual property. Plans are to have it opened up by the end of the third quarter in 2016, with a virtual centre expected to be operational sooner, he said.

David Potter, an associate professor in the school, said the school brings in community members so students can discover problems and opportunities where they can add value in the real world.

Events like the one held Monday are an opportunity to hear what the students came up with as a way to tackle those challenges.

"Some of these collaborations will turn into businesses that stay in Hamilton and contribute to the economy here," Potter said. "Some of the projects will become just a learning experience but those students will stay in Hamilton and work for businesses in Hamilton and bring that skill set to the companies that hire them in Hamilton."

Presentations Monday night were expected to touch on topics including energy recovery alternatives in steel making and the company FISH Technologies (Farming Innovations and Sustainable Horticulture), which was recently awarded $20,000 through McMaster's on-campus entrepreneurship initiative, Spectrum.

Rosier said he was invited to speak at the event because of the similarities between the goals of the W. Booth School and those of the innovation centre.

"As they're thinking about projects and engaging with the community … think about areas that might affect the prevention of disease," he said in an interview. "How do I keep people from not coming into the health care system? How do I deal with health at home? Prevent it? Treat it?"

npaddon@thespec.com

905-526-2420 | @NatatTheSpec

Tackling health care through innovation; Mac students told of opportunities in Hamilton

News Apr 04, 2016 by Natalie Paddon The Hamilton Spectator

Innovation is the only way to meet the upcoming demands of an aging population, an IBM senior executive told a group of engineering students Monday night.

IBM Canada's Ross Rosier highlighted figures like Ontario's $52-billion health care budget, and the fact that almost half of that goes to support people age 65 and older.

In 20 years, the population of seniors is expected to double, he said.

"The only solution to that is innovation in health care," Rosier during his talk at the Hamilton Public Library. "There's a tremendous business opportunity and a tremendous need for innovation to fix that problem."

Rosier was the guest speaker at McMaster University's W. Booth School of Engineering Practice's Innovation Studio Community Check-In, held to showcase projects in development by graduate students in the program.

Rosier, project executive for IBM-Collaborative Innovation Centre, is responsible for "opening up," "initiating" and getting the collaboration centre with Hamilton Health Sciences "moving," he said.

Announced in March, the partnership between IBM Canada and Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation will bring as many as 400 jobs into the downtown core and boost Hamilton's economy when it comes to health care and intellectual property. Plans are to have it opened up by the end of the third quarter in 2016, with a virtual centre expected to be operational sooner, he said.

David Potter, an associate professor in the school, said the school brings in community members so students can discover problems and opportunities where they can add value in the real world.

Events like the one held Monday are an opportunity to hear what the students came up with as a way to tackle those challenges.

"Some of these collaborations will turn into businesses that stay in Hamilton and contribute to the economy here," Potter said. "Some of the projects will become just a learning experience but those students will stay in Hamilton and work for businesses in Hamilton and bring that skill set to the companies that hire them in Hamilton."

Presentations Monday night were expected to touch on topics including energy recovery alternatives in steel making and the company FISH Technologies (Farming Innovations and Sustainable Horticulture), which was recently awarded $20,000 through McMaster's on-campus entrepreneurship initiative, Spectrum.

Rosier said he was invited to speak at the event because of the similarities between the goals of the W. Booth School and those of the innovation centre.

"As they're thinking about projects and engaging with the community … think about areas that might affect the prevention of disease," he said in an interview. "How do I keep people from not coming into the health care system? How do I deal with health at home? Prevent it? Treat it?"

npaddon@thespec.com

905-526-2420 | @NatatTheSpec