Wynne scraps private fundraisers with high rollers, urges rivals to do the same

News Apr 05, 2016 by Robert Benzie OurWindsor.Ca

Premier Kathleen Wynne is cancelling all of her private fundraisers with high rollers and urging her political rivals to do the same.

Wynne told the legislature on Tuesday she will no longer attend such events that raise money for the Ontario Liberal Party “to lead by example.”

The premier’s about-face comes as her government is preparing new legislation this spring to clamp down on Ontario’s lax political fundraising rules in the wake of a Star probe.

Last week, the Toronto Star’s Martin Regg Cohn uncovered the fact that Liberal cabinet ministers have secret annual party fundraising targets of up to $500,000 apiece.

Outcry over that revelation forced the Liberals, who will mark their 13th anniversary in power this October, to finally move on reforms.

Wynne, who will meet with Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown and NDP Leader Andrea Horwath this week, said her opponents should also agree to stop their private fundraisers.

But Brown, who, as the Star disclosed Tuesday, is hosting his own high-priced dinner at the posh Albany Club for 10 supporters at $10,000 a head later this month, said he won’t cancel his events.

The Tory leader said he shouldn’t have to because, unlike Wynne and her ministers, he is not in the position “to award contracts.”

Legislation reforming Ontario’s loose political fundraising rules will be tabled before the house rises for the summer break June 2.

Wynne said it will outlawing corporate and union donations to political parties and would reduce the amount individuals can donate.

That will lower the $9,975 annual cap on contributions and close the loopholes that allowing donors to give much more than that during byelections and party leadership campaigns.

At the same time, so-called third-party advertising — usually union-funded attack ads against the Conservatives that help the Liberals and New Democrats — will also be outlawed.

Toronto Star

Wynne scraps private fundraisers with high rollers, urges rivals to do the same

The premier’s about-face comes as her government is preparing new legislation this spring to clamp down on Ontario’s lax political fundraising rules in the wake of a Toronto Star probe

News Apr 05, 2016 by Robert Benzie OurWindsor.Ca

Premier Kathleen Wynne is cancelling all of her private fundraisers with high rollers and urging her political rivals to do the same.

Wynne told the legislature on Tuesday she will no longer attend such events that raise money for the Ontario Liberal Party “to lead by example.”

The premier’s about-face comes as her government is preparing new legislation this spring to clamp down on Ontario’s lax political fundraising rules in the wake of a Star probe.

Last week, the Toronto Star’s Martin Regg Cohn uncovered the fact that Liberal cabinet ministers have secret annual party fundraising targets of up to $500,000 apiece.

Outcry over that revelation forced the Liberals, who will mark their 13th anniversary in power this October, to finally move on reforms.

Wynne, who will meet with Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown and NDP Leader Andrea Horwath this week, said her opponents should also agree to stop their private fundraisers.

But Brown, who, as the Star disclosed Tuesday, is hosting his own high-priced dinner at the posh Albany Club for 10 supporters at $10,000 a head later this month, said he won’t cancel his events.

The Tory leader said he shouldn’t have to because, unlike Wynne and her ministers, he is not in the position “to award contracts.”

Legislation reforming Ontario’s loose political fundraising rules will be tabled before the house rises for the summer break June 2.

Wynne said it will outlawing corporate and union donations to political parties and would reduce the amount individuals can donate.

That will lower the $9,975 annual cap on contributions and close the loopholes that allowing donors to give much more than that during byelections and party leadership campaigns.

At the same time, so-called third-party advertising — usually union-funded attack ads against the Conservatives that help the Liberals and New Democrats — will also be outlawed.

Toronto Star

Wynne scraps private fundraisers with high rollers, urges rivals to do the same

The premier’s about-face comes as her government is preparing new legislation this spring to clamp down on Ontario’s lax political fundraising rules in the wake of a Toronto Star probe

News Apr 05, 2016 by Robert Benzie OurWindsor.Ca

Premier Kathleen Wynne is cancelling all of her private fundraisers with high rollers and urging her political rivals to do the same.

Wynne told the legislature on Tuesday she will no longer attend such events that raise money for the Ontario Liberal Party “to lead by example.”

The premier’s about-face comes as her government is preparing new legislation this spring to clamp down on Ontario’s lax political fundraising rules in the wake of a Star probe.

Last week, the Toronto Star’s Martin Regg Cohn uncovered the fact that Liberal cabinet ministers have secret annual party fundraising targets of up to $500,000 apiece.

Outcry over that revelation forced the Liberals, who will mark their 13th anniversary in power this October, to finally move on reforms.

Wynne, who will meet with Progressive Conservative Leader Patrick Brown and NDP Leader Andrea Horwath this week, said her opponents should also agree to stop their private fundraisers.

But Brown, who, as the Star disclosed Tuesday, is hosting his own high-priced dinner at the posh Albany Club for 10 supporters at $10,000 a head later this month, said he won’t cancel his events.

The Tory leader said he shouldn’t have to because, unlike Wynne and her ministers, he is not in the position “to award contracts.”

Legislation reforming Ontario’s loose political fundraising rules will be tabled before the house rises for the summer break June 2.

Wynne said it will outlawing corporate and union donations to political parties and would reduce the amount individuals can donate.

That will lower the $9,975 annual cap on contributions and close the loopholes that allowing donors to give much more than that during byelections and party leadership campaigns.

At the same time, so-called third-party advertising — usually union-funded attack ads against the Conservatives that help the Liberals and New Democrats — will also be outlawed.

Toronto Star