Mississauga voters could face referendum on whether to separate from Peel

News Apr 06, 2016 by Rachael Williams Mississauga News

Mississauga could face a referendum during the next municipal election regarding its status in the Region of Peel.

Mayor Bonnie Crombie put forward a motion during Wednesday’s general committee meeting to move forward with a report looking at whether or not Mississauga should remain part of the Region, a debate that’s being going on for years.

Crombie put a request in to staff to conduct a cost-benefit analysis regarding whether or not the City should move towards a single-tier municipality or keep with the status quo.

“We could put it on the ballot in 2018 and make it a referendum item,” said Crombie. 

Councillor Pat Saito was in support of a future referendum, but said the issue of representation on regional council needs to be addressed first, including an increase in representatives for Brampton and for Caledon, a reduction, based on population numbers.

"We promised Brampton we would address this. We need to give clear direction."

City manager Janice Baker estimates the study would cost $200,000 to $250,000 and stressed it would have to be completed by someone credible, independent and experienced.

Baker cautioned councillors that the study, if done without participation from Brampton and Caledon, would come off as bias and impartial. However, she advised it would be optimistic to assume staff and members of regional council would be able to sit around a table and come up with an objective analysis.

“We’ll end up spinning our wheels,” Baker said.

Councillors in support of separation from the Region cited cost efficiencies and reduced bureaucracy as reasons to opt out.

And the idea that Mississauga taxpayer dollars are being used to fund the development of Caledon didn’t sit well with councillors Parrish and Iannicca.

“We’re no longer going to fund the country club known as Caledon,” said Parrish.

Ward 2 Coun. Karen Ras wasn’t as eager to cut the umbilical chord.

“I like this relationship of us being a family and Mississauga being the oldest sibling. At some point, the youngest sibling will be supporting the oldest sibling that’s going to be in a retirement home,” she commented.

Ras added, by 2031, the populations of Caledon and Brampton will exceed Mississauga.

“I want to see the financials behind it… Our tax dollars that are going to the Region are used so they can do a lot of the heavy lifting that we don’t have the experience to do,” said Ras.

Councillor Jim Tovey agreed with Ras, but took the conversation one step further, saying he wants to discuss the creation of the City of Peel.

“We would have area-wide distribution of costs and services, which may or may not save us money. We don’t know. I want to see the business case.”

“I fundamentally disagree,” said Parrish.

“The demographics are different, the budget process is different, our planning approach is different. We are at different stages of growth. Caledon should be growing up with Orangeville and Dufferin,” said Parrish

Tovey cautioned, Caledon is going to be Mississauga’s “food basket” one day and that severing ties is premature.

Crombie argued the significance of optics: “This is our identity as a City. This is who we are.

“Should the City of Mississauga not control its own destiny?”

The motion for a report coincides with governance discussions that will begin Thursday with a facilitator who has been hired by the Region. Crombie will sit on a task force assigned to holding initial discussions and brainstorming proposed changes to regional council.

Crombie said her motion to have a City report in the works will help clarify Mississauga’s position and provide some facts and figures to back up any proposed changes surrounding a possible separation from Peel.

 

Mississauga voters could face referendum on whether to separate from Peel

News Apr 06, 2016 by Rachael Williams Mississauga News

Mississauga could face a referendum during the next municipal election regarding its status in the Region of Peel.

Mayor Bonnie Crombie put forward a motion during Wednesday’s general committee meeting to move forward with a report looking at whether or not Mississauga should remain part of the Region, a debate that’s being going on for years.

Crombie put a request in to staff to conduct a cost-benefit analysis regarding whether or not the City should move towards a single-tier municipality or keep with the status quo.

“We could put it on the ballot in 2018 and make it a referendum item,” said Crombie. 

Councillor Pat Saito was in support of a future referendum, but said the issue of representation on regional council needs to be addressed first, including an increase in representatives for Brampton and for Caledon, a reduction, based on population numbers.

"We promised Brampton we would address this. We need to give clear direction."

City manager Janice Baker estimates the study would cost $200,000 to $250,000 and stressed it would have to be completed by someone credible, independent and experienced.

Baker cautioned councillors that the study, if done without participation from Brampton and Caledon, would come off as bias and impartial. However, she advised it would be optimistic to assume staff and members of regional council would be able to sit around a table and come up with an objective analysis.

“We’ll end up spinning our wheels,” Baker said.

Councillors in support of separation from the Region cited cost efficiencies and reduced bureaucracy as reasons to opt out.

And the idea that Mississauga taxpayer dollars are being used to fund the development of Caledon didn’t sit well with councillors Parrish and Iannicca.

“We’re no longer going to fund the country club known as Caledon,” said Parrish.

Ward 2 Coun. Karen Ras wasn’t as eager to cut the umbilical chord.

“I like this relationship of us being a family and Mississauga being the oldest sibling. At some point, the youngest sibling will be supporting the oldest sibling that’s going to be in a retirement home,” she commented.

Ras added, by 2031, the populations of Caledon and Brampton will exceed Mississauga.

“I want to see the financials behind it… Our tax dollars that are going to the Region are used so they can do a lot of the heavy lifting that we don’t have the experience to do,” said Ras.

Councillor Jim Tovey agreed with Ras, but took the conversation one step further, saying he wants to discuss the creation of the City of Peel.

“We would have area-wide distribution of costs and services, which may or may not save us money. We don’t know. I want to see the business case.”

“I fundamentally disagree,” said Parrish.

“The demographics are different, the budget process is different, our planning approach is different. We are at different stages of growth. Caledon should be growing up with Orangeville and Dufferin,” said Parrish

Tovey cautioned, Caledon is going to be Mississauga’s “food basket” one day and that severing ties is premature.

Crombie argued the significance of optics: “This is our identity as a City. This is who we are.

“Should the City of Mississauga not control its own destiny?”

The motion for a report coincides with governance discussions that will begin Thursday with a facilitator who has been hired by the Region. Crombie will sit on a task force assigned to holding initial discussions and brainstorming proposed changes to regional council.

Crombie said her motion to have a City report in the works will help clarify Mississauga’s position and provide some facts and figures to back up any proposed changes surrounding a possible separation from Peel.

 

Mississauga voters could face referendum on whether to separate from Peel

News Apr 06, 2016 by Rachael Williams Mississauga News

Mississauga could face a referendum during the next municipal election regarding its status in the Region of Peel.

Mayor Bonnie Crombie put forward a motion during Wednesday’s general committee meeting to move forward with a report looking at whether or not Mississauga should remain part of the Region, a debate that’s being going on for years.

Crombie put a request in to staff to conduct a cost-benefit analysis regarding whether or not the City should move towards a single-tier municipality or keep with the status quo.

“We could put it on the ballot in 2018 and make it a referendum item,” said Crombie. 

Councillor Pat Saito was in support of a future referendum, but said the issue of representation on regional council needs to be addressed first, including an increase in representatives for Brampton and for Caledon, a reduction, based on population numbers.

"We promised Brampton we would address this. We need to give clear direction."

City manager Janice Baker estimates the study would cost $200,000 to $250,000 and stressed it would have to be completed by someone credible, independent and experienced.

Baker cautioned councillors that the study, if done without participation from Brampton and Caledon, would come off as bias and impartial. However, she advised it would be optimistic to assume staff and members of regional council would be able to sit around a table and come up with an objective analysis.

“We’ll end up spinning our wheels,” Baker said.

Councillors in support of separation from the Region cited cost efficiencies and reduced bureaucracy as reasons to opt out.

And the idea that Mississauga taxpayer dollars are being used to fund the development of Caledon didn’t sit well with councillors Parrish and Iannicca.

“We’re no longer going to fund the country club known as Caledon,” said Parrish.

Ward 2 Coun. Karen Ras wasn’t as eager to cut the umbilical chord.

“I like this relationship of us being a family and Mississauga being the oldest sibling. At some point, the youngest sibling will be supporting the oldest sibling that’s going to be in a retirement home,” she commented.

Ras added, by 2031, the populations of Caledon and Brampton will exceed Mississauga.

“I want to see the financials behind it… Our tax dollars that are going to the Region are used so they can do a lot of the heavy lifting that we don’t have the experience to do,” said Ras.

Councillor Jim Tovey agreed with Ras, but took the conversation one step further, saying he wants to discuss the creation of the City of Peel.

“We would have area-wide distribution of costs and services, which may or may not save us money. We don’t know. I want to see the business case.”

“I fundamentally disagree,” said Parrish.

“The demographics are different, the budget process is different, our planning approach is different. We are at different stages of growth. Caledon should be growing up with Orangeville and Dufferin,” said Parrish

Tovey cautioned, Caledon is going to be Mississauga’s “food basket” one day and that severing ties is premature.

Crombie argued the significance of optics: “This is our identity as a City. This is who we are.

“Should the City of Mississauga not control its own destiny?”

The motion for a report coincides with governance discussions that will begin Thursday with a facilitator who has been hired by the Region. Crombie will sit on a task force assigned to holding initial discussions and brainstorming proposed changes to regional council.

Crombie said her motion to have a City report in the works will help clarify Mississauga’s position and provide some facts and figures to back up any proposed changes surrounding a possible separation from Peel.