Flamborough Doors owner set to rebuild after storage barn fire

News Apr 07, 2016 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

Reality is starting to sink in for Russ Nicholson, who lost his barn in a fire on his 8th Concession property March 31.

“Every time you go to do something, it’s like ‘Yeah, there’s nothing there,’” he said during an interview with the Review this week.

At around 8 p.m., last Thursday, the Hamilton Fire Department was called to put out the blaze, which ultimately caused around $150,000 in damage.

“The structure was fully involved and there was a large 500-pound propane tank at the rear of the building, so we needed to protect that,” said Claudio Mostacci, spokesperson for Hamilton Fire Services. “It was a defensive attack, we weren’t inside the building because of the amount of fire.”

Nicholson, who operates Flamborough Doors, said the barn, which acted as a hobby shop, didn’t have any livestock or work–related items in it at the time, although there were tools and supplies inside he used for work. Also spared from the fire was an all-terrain vehicle that was sitting out in the yard and a car that was parked for the winter. “Luckily, I didn’t lose my toys,” said Nicholson.

While the authorities have not given a definitive cause of the fire, Nicholson says it was most likely lightning. “They didn’t see an exact strike in the area from cloud to ground, was the way they put it,” he said. “But they said, ‘Quite often strikes go from cloud to cloud,’ which very well could’ve still caused the problem.” He added that the point of origin was the top of the barn.

According to Mostacci, however, the official report suggested it could have been caused by an overheated sump-pump.

“The fire was the greatest in that area where a sump pump was running,” he said.

Fire crews arrived about 15 minutes after the call was made and stayed for six hours as a fire watch, although the actual flames were extinguished in just over an hour.

“In fact, the fire watch was dispatched more than once over the weekend as the barn reignited. “It was a very difficult fire to put out because the fire got in between the two layers (of the building) and so there may have been a little bit left over,” said Mostacci.

Regardless of the cause, rebuilding won’t be easy, as Nicholson will be responsible for at least half of the cost. He explained that the next steps are to work with the insurance company to have the damage assessed.

“I’m definitely at a huge loss,” he said, noting that the contents make up 90 per cent of what he is covered for. He said he is working with the insurance company, which has been right on track with getting an assessment started so he can start rebuilding. Although this time, there may be a few changes to the design.

“I think I’m going to put up something that I can afford now and then something I can always add on to later,” he said, noting while now would be the time to build a bigger barn, he’s economizing.

“Now I just need a building of some sort.”

Flamborough Doors owner set to rebuild after storage barn fire

March 31 blaze caused $150K in damage

News Apr 07, 2016 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

Reality is starting to sink in for Russ Nicholson, who lost his barn in a fire on his 8th Concession property March 31.

“Every time you go to do something, it’s like ‘Yeah, there’s nothing there,’” he said during an interview with the Review this week.

At around 8 p.m., last Thursday, the Hamilton Fire Department was called to put out the blaze, which ultimately caused around $150,000 in damage.

“The structure was fully involved and there was a large 500-pound propane tank at the rear of the building, so we needed to protect that,” said Claudio Mostacci, spokesperson for Hamilton Fire Services. “It was a defensive attack, we weren’t inside the building because of the amount of fire.”

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Nicholson, who operates Flamborough Doors, said the barn, which acted as a hobby shop, didn’t have any livestock or work–related items in it at the time, although there were tools and supplies inside he used for work. Also spared from the fire was an all-terrain vehicle that was sitting out in the yard and a car that was parked for the winter. “Luckily, I didn’t lose my toys,” said Nicholson.

While the authorities have not given a definitive cause of the fire, Nicholson says it was most likely lightning. “They didn’t see an exact strike in the area from cloud to ground, was the way they put it,” he said. “But they said, ‘Quite often strikes go from cloud to cloud,’ which very well could’ve still caused the problem.” He added that the point of origin was the top of the barn.

According to Mostacci, however, the official report suggested it could have been caused by an overheated sump-pump.

“The fire was the greatest in that area where a sump pump was running,” he said.

Fire crews arrived about 15 minutes after the call was made and stayed for six hours as a fire watch, although the actual flames were extinguished in just over an hour.

“In fact, the fire watch was dispatched more than once over the weekend as the barn reignited. “It was a very difficult fire to put out because the fire got in between the two layers (of the building) and so there may have been a little bit left over,” said Mostacci.

Regardless of the cause, rebuilding won’t be easy, as Nicholson will be responsible for at least half of the cost. He explained that the next steps are to work with the insurance company to have the damage assessed.

“I’m definitely at a huge loss,” he said, noting that the contents make up 90 per cent of what he is covered for. He said he is working with the insurance company, which has been right on track with getting an assessment started so he can start rebuilding. Although this time, there may be a few changes to the design.

“I think I’m going to put up something that I can afford now and then something I can always add on to later,” he said, noting while now would be the time to build a bigger barn, he’s economizing.

“Now I just need a building of some sort.”

Flamborough Doors owner set to rebuild after storage barn fire

March 31 blaze caused $150K in damage

News Apr 07, 2016 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

Reality is starting to sink in for Russ Nicholson, who lost his barn in a fire on his 8th Concession property March 31.

“Every time you go to do something, it’s like ‘Yeah, there’s nothing there,’” he said during an interview with the Review this week.

At around 8 p.m., last Thursday, the Hamilton Fire Department was called to put out the blaze, which ultimately caused around $150,000 in damage.

“The structure was fully involved and there was a large 500-pound propane tank at the rear of the building, so we needed to protect that,” said Claudio Mostacci, spokesperson for Hamilton Fire Services. “It was a defensive attack, we weren’t inside the building because of the amount of fire.”

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Nicholson, who operates Flamborough Doors, said the barn, which acted as a hobby shop, didn’t have any livestock or work–related items in it at the time, although there were tools and supplies inside he used for work. Also spared from the fire was an all-terrain vehicle that was sitting out in the yard and a car that was parked for the winter. “Luckily, I didn’t lose my toys,” said Nicholson.

While the authorities have not given a definitive cause of the fire, Nicholson says it was most likely lightning. “They didn’t see an exact strike in the area from cloud to ground, was the way they put it,” he said. “But they said, ‘Quite often strikes go from cloud to cloud,’ which very well could’ve still caused the problem.” He added that the point of origin was the top of the barn.

According to Mostacci, however, the official report suggested it could have been caused by an overheated sump-pump.

“The fire was the greatest in that area where a sump pump was running,” he said.

Fire crews arrived about 15 minutes after the call was made and stayed for six hours as a fire watch, although the actual flames were extinguished in just over an hour.

“In fact, the fire watch was dispatched more than once over the weekend as the barn reignited. “It was a very difficult fire to put out because the fire got in between the two layers (of the building) and so there may have been a little bit left over,” said Mostacci.

Regardless of the cause, rebuilding won’t be easy, as Nicholson will be responsible for at least half of the cost. He explained that the next steps are to work with the insurance company to have the damage assessed.

“I’m definitely at a huge loss,” he said, noting that the contents make up 90 per cent of what he is covered for. He said he is working with the insurance company, which has been right on track with getting an assessment started so he can start rebuilding. Although this time, there may be a few changes to the design.

“I think I’m going to put up something that I can afford now and then something I can always add on to later,” he said, noting while now would be the time to build a bigger barn, he’s economizing.

“Now I just need a building of some sort.”