24,000 people out of work in the Hamilton area

News Apr 08, 2016 by Andy Blatchford Hamilton Spectator

Hamilton's unemployment rate ticked up by half a percentage point in March.

Compared with March of 2015, the jobless rate moved to 5.9 per cent from 5.4 per cent a year ago according to the latest version of Statistics Canada's Labour Force Survey.

In human terms, that means 24,000 people are counted as officially unemployed in the Hamilton-Burlington-Grimsby area. That's up from 21,700 for the same month last year.

The hike in the unemployment rate comes as more people crowd into the local workforce and more are employed.

The Statistics Canada report shows a local labour force of 408,100. That's up from 400,800 from last year. The number employed rose to 384,100 from 379,100.

The country's labour market as a whole saw a surge in full-time and private-sector work last month, increases that helped drive the national unemployment rate down to 7.1 per cent.

The findings of the agency's labour force survey offered fresh clues that Canada's economy could be building momentum. The job market generated 40,600 net new positions in March, lowering the jobless rate from its 7.3 per cent reading in February. This was the largest month-over-month increase since 43,100 jobs were added in October.

The details of the March data also showed encouraging signs because 35,300 of the net new jobs were full-time, while the private sector created 65,100 positions.

The biggest gain was registered in services industries, which added 74,700 net new jobs.

"It gives us a picture of a job market that I think overall is pretty healthy given the current circumstances," said Desjardins senior economist Jimmy Jean, referring to the struggles in the oil sector linked to the plunge in crude prices.

In the hard hit energy-rich region of Alberta, the provincial unemployment rate fell to 7.1 per cent in March compared with 7.9 per cent in February, thanks to more retail and wholesale trade positions. This change came despite the fact the jobless rate rose in both Calgary and Edmonton.

Calgary's unemployment rate rose to 8.6 per cent from 8.4 per cent in February — reaching its highest mark in at least 20 years. In Edmonton, the rate crept up to 6.9 per cent from 6.8 per cent. Statistics Canada cautions the figures for individual cities may fluctuate widely because they are based on small samples.

Overall, compared with 12 months earlier, Canada added 129,600 net new jobs, an increase of 0.7 per cent.

A consensus of economists had been predicting the country would add 10,000 net jobs overall in March and for the unemployment rate to stay at 7.3 per cent, according to Thomson Reuters.

Considering the significant economic challenges faced by the commodity sector, Jean was encouraged that the March report boosted Canada's six-month average for monthly job gains to about 11,000. He said that, on average, the job market adds 16,000 positions per month under more-normal economic conditions.

Jean said the jobs numbers suggest the worst of the oil-price shock could be a thing of the past.

The country's youth unemployment rate crept up 13.4 per cent last month, from 13.3 per cent in February.

The data also showed that self-employed positions across Canada fell by 22,000 last month, while the net number of employee jobs increased by 62,600.

The Canadian Press

With files from Steve Arnold, The Hamilton Spectator

24,000 people out of work in the Hamilton area

Nationally, full-time jobs climb in March while unemployment rate slips to 7.1 per cent

News Apr 08, 2016 by Andy Blatchford Hamilton Spectator

Hamilton's unemployment rate ticked up by half a percentage point in March.

Compared with March of 2015, the jobless rate moved to 5.9 per cent from 5.4 per cent a year ago according to the latest version of Statistics Canada's Labour Force Survey.

In human terms, that means 24,000 people are counted as officially unemployed in the Hamilton-Burlington-Grimsby area. That's up from 21,700 for the same month last year.

The hike in the unemployment rate comes as more people crowd into the local workforce and more are employed.

The Statistics Canada report shows a local labour force of 408,100. That's up from 400,800 from last year. The number employed rose to 384,100 from 379,100.

The country's labour market as a whole saw a surge in full-time and private-sector work last month, increases that helped drive the national unemployment rate down to 7.1 per cent.

The findings of the agency's labour force survey offered fresh clues that Canada's economy could be building momentum. The job market generated 40,600 net new positions in March, lowering the jobless rate from its 7.3 per cent reading in February. This was the largest month-over-month increase since 43,100 jobs were added in October.

The details of the March data also showed encouraging signs because 35,300 of the net new jobs were full-time, while the private sector created 65,100 positions.

The biggest gain was registered in services industries, which added 74,700 net new jobs.

"It gives us a picture of a job market that I think overall is pretty healthy given the current circumstances," said Desjardins senior economist Jimmy Jean, referring to the struggles in the oil sector linked to the plunge in crude prices.

In the hard hit energy-rich region of Alberta, the provincial unemployment rate fell to 7.1 per cent in March compared with 7.9 per cent in February, thanks to more retail and wholesale trade positions. This change came despite the fact the jobless rate rose in both Calgary and Edmonton.

Calgary's unemployment rate rose to 8.6 per cent from 8.4 per cent in February — reaching its highest mark in at least 20 years. In Edmonton, the rate crept up to 6.9 per cent from 6.8 per cent. Statistics Canada cautions the figures for individual cities may fluctuate widely because they are based on small samples.

Overall, compared with 12 months earlier, Canada added 129,600 net new jobs, an increase of 0.7 per cent.

A consensus of economists had been predicting the country would add 10,000 net jobs overall in March and for the unemployment rate to stay at 7.3 per cent, according to Thomson Reuters.

Considering the significant economic challenges faced by the commodity sector, Jean was encouraged that the March report boosted Canada's six-month average for monthly job gains to about 11,000. He said that, on average, the job market adds 16,000 positions per month under more-normal economic conditions.

Jean said the jobs numbers suggest the worst of the oil-price shock could be a thing of the past.

The country's youth unemployment rate crept up 13.4 per cent last month, from 13.3 per cent in February.

The data also showed that self-employed positions across Canada fell by 22,000 last month, while the net number of employee jobs increased by 62,600.

The Canadian Press

With files from Steve Arnold, The Hamilton Spectator

24,000 people out of work in the Hamilton area

Nationally, full-time jobs climb in March while unemployment rate slips to 7.1 per cent

News Apr 08, 2016 by Andy Blatchford Hamilton Spectator

Hamilton's unemployment rate ticked up by half a percentage point in March.

Compared with March of 2015, the jobless rate moved to 5.9 per cent from 5.4 per cent a year ago according to the latest version of Statistics Canada's Labour Force Survey.

In human terms, that means 24,000 people are counted as officially unemployed in the Hamilton-Burlington-Grimsby area. That's up from 21,700 for the same month last year.

The hike in the unemployment rate comes as more people crowd into the local workforce and more are employed.

The Statistics Canada report shows a local labour force of 408,100. That's up from 400,800 from last year. The number employed rose to 384,100 from 379,100.

The country's labour market as a whole saw a surge in full-time and private-sector work last month, increases that helped drive the national unemployment rate down to 7.1 per cent.

The findings of the agency's labour force survey offered fresh clues that Canada's economy could be building momentum. The job market generated 40,600 net new positions in March, lowering the jobless rate from its 7.3 per cent reading in February. This was the largest month-over-month increase since 43,100 jobs were added in October.

The details of the March data also showed encouraging signs because 35,300 of the net new jobs were full-time, while the private sector created 65,100 positions.

The biggest gain was registered in services industries, which added 74,700 net new jobs.

"It gives us a picture of a job market that I think overall is pretty healthy given the current circumstances," said Desjardins senior economist Jimmy Jean, referring to the struggles in the oil sector linked to the plunge in crude prices.

In the hard hit energy-rich region of Alberta, the provincial unemployment rate fell to 7.1 per cent in March compared with 7.9 per cent in February, thanks to more retail and wholesale trade positions. This change came despite the fact the jobless rate rose in both Calgary and Edmonton.

Calgary's unemployment rate rose to 8.6 per cent from 8.4 per cent in February — reaching its highest mark in at least 20 years. In Edmonton, the rate crept up to 6.9 per cent from 6.8 per cent. Statistics Canada cautions the figures for individual cities may fluctuate widely because they are based on small samples.

Overall, compared with 12 months earlier, Canada added 129,600 net new jobs, an increase of 0.7 per cent.

A consensus of economists had been predicting the country would add 10,000 net jobs overall in March and for the unemployment rate to stay at 7.3 per cent, according to Thomson Reuters.

Considering the significant economic challenges faced by the commodity sector, Jean was encouraged that the March report boosted Canada's six-month average for monthly job gains to about 11,000. He said that, on average, the job market adds 16,000 positions per month under more-normal economic conditions.

Jean said the jobs numbers suggest the worst of the oil-price shock could be a thing of the past.

The country's youth unemployment rate crept up 13.4 per cent last month, from 13.3 per cent in February.

The data also showed that self-employed positions across Canada fell by 22,000 last month, while the net number of employee jobs increased by 62,600.

The Canadian Press

With files from Steve Arnold, The Hamilton Spectator