Hamilton isn’t about to “ban” guns in city, says councillor

News Apr 11, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s hunters and rural residents are targeting the city’s plan to review its firearm discharge bylaw believing it will eventually ban the use of guns in more rural areas of the city.

After public meetings held by Glanbrook councillor Brenda Johnson, Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson, and at least three sessions held by city bylaw staff, the city’s rural community remains convinced the review will mean less access for gun users.

“There is a concern among all hunters, trappers and farmers (about what will be in a future report),” said Brian McRae, of the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.

McRae said people have contacted the organization because of their belief the city is poised to ban firearms, including crossbows and bow and arrows in areas of Hamilton. Under the current bylaw, discharging of firearms is prohibited in the urban areas of the city.

“We understand there is a need to have a buffer zone (between rural area and residential houses),” said McRae. “That’s reasonable. “

But his organization would be opposed to any firearm bans, including bows.

Last fall councillors agreed to a staff recommendation to consider a “comprehensive” review of the city’s firearm discharge bylaw. The last review was conducted 11 years ago.

The idea, say city staff, is to “simplify” the rules including identifying possible new boundaries for the use of firearms to “increase the restricted locations in the city,” changing the name of the bylaw from firearms discharge to weapons discharge so that the legislation will incorporate bows and arrows, crossbows, BB guns, and air rifles as weapons.

Johnson said the rumour circulating among the rural population is that the city is trying to ban guns.

“That is not the case to ban guns,” she said.

Marty Hazell, senior director of parking and bylaw services, stated the city “is not looking to change the bylaw, nor to prohibit firearm discharge within the City of Hamilton.”

Hazell stated though that “due to new and future housing developments, the City is examining expanding the boundaries that surround urban residential areas for safety reasons.”

Johnson said Hamilton’s firearms discharge legislation already prohibits the use of guns in Upper Stoney Creek. She said the use of guns will remain unchanged in such places as Binbrook, but she acknowledged that places such as Hanover and Elfrida “will have to change.”

She said the review will “properly reflect” the new reality of the expanding growth in Upper Stoney Creek and Glanbrook.

“It’s about all the new development,” she said.

During her recent public meeting, a few residents told her of people shooting at chickens in their yards, or finding slugs in their gardens.

“Responsible hunters obey the rules,” said Johnson. “We are looking at the irresponsible hunter.”

She said staff wants to follow the firearm discharge guidelines that have already been adopted by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.

Bylaw staff will be presenting a preliminary report to the May 17 planning committee meeting.

Ann Lamanes, communications officer with the city, stated the report will be “very preliminary” and a draft bylaw won’t be introduced to councillors until later this year. City bylaw staff is scheduled to hold further public meetings during the summer.

“We will be very interested in that report,” said McRae.

McRae said his organization’s members want to be involved in any consultations the city has with the rural community.

“Hunting is one of the safest activities out there,” he said.

 

Hamilton isn’t about to “ban” guns in city, says councillor

News Apr 11, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s hunters and rural residents are targeting the city’s plan to review its firearm discharge bylaw believing it will eventually ban the use of guns in more rural areas of the city.

After public meetings held by Glanbrook councillor Brenda Johnson, Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson, and at least three sessions held by city bylaw staff, the city’s rural community remains convinced the review will mean less access for gun users.

“There is a concern among all hunters, trappers and farmers (about what will be in a future report),” said Brian McRae, of the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.

McRae said people have contacted the organization because of their belief the city is poised to ban firearms, including crossbows and bow and arrows in areas of Hamilton. Under the current bylaw, discharging of firearms is prohibited in the urban areas of the city.

“We understand there is a need to have a buffer zone (between rural area and residential houses),” said McRae. “That’s reasonable. “

But his organization would be opposed to any firearm bans, including bows.

Last fall councillors agreed to a staff recommendation to consider a “comprehensive” review of the city’s firearm discharge bylaw. The last review was conducted 11 years ago.

The idea, say city staff, is to “simplify” the rules including identifying possible new boundaries for the use of firearms to “increase the restricted locations in the city,” changing the name of the bylaw from firearms discharge to weapons discharge so that the legislation will incorporate bows and arrows, crossbows, BB guns, and air rifles as weapons.

Johnson said the rumour circulating among the rural population is that the city is trying to ban guns.

“That is not the case to ban guns,” she said.

Marty Hazell, senior director of parking and bylaw services, stated the city “is not looking to change the bylaw, nor to prohibit firearm discharge within the City of Hamilton.”

Hazell stated though that “due to new and future housing developments, the City is examining expanding the boundaries that surround urban residential areas for safety reasons.”

Johnson said Hamilton’s firearms discharge legislation already prohibits the use of guns in Upper Stoney Creek. She said the use of guns will remain unchanged in such places as Binbrook, but she acknowledged that places such as Hanover and Elfrida “will have to change.”

She said the review will “properly reflect” the new reality of the expanding growth in Upper Stoney Creek and Glanbrook.

“It’s about all the new development,” she said.

During her recent public meeting, a few residents told her of people shooting at chickens in their yards, or finding slugs in their gardens.

“Responsible hunters obey the rules,” said Johnson. “We are looking at the irresponsible hunter.”

She said staff wants to follow the firearm discharge guidelines that have already been adopted by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.

Bylaw staff will be presenting a preliminary report to the May 17 planning committee meeting.

Ann Lamanes, communications officer with the city, stated the report will be “very preliminary” and a draft bylaw won’t be introduced to councillors until later this year. City bylaw staff is scheduled to hold further public meetings during the summer.

“We will be very interested in that report,” said McRae.

McRae said his organization’s members want to be involved in any consultations the city has with the rural community.

“Hunting is one of the safest activities out there,” he said.

 

Hamilton isn’t about to “ban” guns in city, says councillor

News Apr 11, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s hunters and rural residents are targeting the city’s plan to review its firearm discharge bylaw believing it will eventually ban the use of guns in more rural areas of the city.

After public meetings held by Glanbrook councillor Brenda Johnson, Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson, and at least three sessions held by city bylaw staff, the city’s rural community remains convinced the review will mean less access for gun users.

“There is a concern among all hunters, trappers and farmers (about what will be in a future report),” said Brian McRae, of the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters.

McRae said people have contacted the organization because of their belief the city is poised to ban firearms, including crossbows and bow and arrows in areas of Hamilton. Under the current bylaw, discharging of firearms is prohibited in the urban areas of the city.

“We understand there is a need to have a buffer zone (between rural area and residential houses),” said McRae. “That’s reasonable. “

But his organization would be opposed to any firearm bans, including bows.

Last fall councillors agreed to a staff recommendation to consider a “comprehensive” review of the city’s firearm discharge bylaw. The last review was conducted 11 years ago.

The idea, say city staff, is to “simplify” the rules including identifying possible new boundaries for the use of firearms to “increase the restricted locations in the city,” changing the name of the bylaw from firearms discharge to weapons discharge so that the legislation will incorporate bows and arrows, crossbows, BB guns, and air rifles as weapons.

Johnson said the rumour circulating among the rural population is that the city is trying to ban guns.

“That is not the case to ban guns,” she said.

Marty Hazell, senior director of parking and bylaw services, stated the city “is not looking to change the bylaw, nor to prohibit firearm discharge within the City of Hamilton.”

Hazell stated though that “due to new and future housing developments, the City is examining expanding the boundaries that surround urban residential areas for safety reasons.”

Johnson said Hamilton’s firearms discharge legislation already prohibits the use of guns in Upper Stoney Creek. She said the use of guns will remain unchanged in such places as Binbrook, but she acknowledged that places such as Hanover and Elfrida “will have to change.”

She said the review will “properly reflect” the new reality of the expanding growth in Upper Stoney Creek and Glanbrook.

“It’s about all the new development,” she said.

During her recent public meeting, a few residents told her of people shooting at chickens in their yards, or finding slugs in their gardens.

“Responsible hunters obey the rules,” said Johnson. “We are looking at the irresponsible hunter.”

She said staff wants to follow the firearm discharge guidelines that have already been adopted by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources.

Bylaw staff will be presenting a preliminary report to the May 17 planning committee meeting.

Ann Lamanes, communications officer with the city, stated the report will be “very preliminary” and a draft bylaw won’t be introduced to councillors until later this year. City bylaw staff is scheduled to hold further public meetings during the summer.

“We will be very interested in that report,” said McRae.

McRae said his organization’s members want to be involved in any consultations the city has with the rural community.

“Hunting is one of the safest activities out there,” he said.