Hamilton’s employee injury rate drops in 2015

News Apr 11, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

There was a welcome decrease in the number of Hamilton employees injured on the job in 2015 because of more education and training for staff and council’s decision to invest additional money for equipment for its emergency service personnel.

“We can’t bubble wrap everyone,” said City Manager Chris Murray. “Everything is moving in the right direction. This is a good news story.”

Still, it cost the city more money in Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) claims despite the drop in incidents, because of higher salaries, rising physician and administration fees and the additional price tag for former firefighters’ disease claims.

In 2015 the total days lost due to injuries last year was 7,497 from 8,141 in 2014, while the number of incidents were reduced from 344 in 2014 to 290 last year. The average number of days lost to injury has steadily declined from a high of 15.48 in 2013, to 9.31 in 2015.

But the WSIB costs in 2015 were $5.7 million compared to $5.6 million in 2014. The city did save about $216,000 with the reduction in injury time.

The number of injuries within the emergency and public works departments has also dropped, staff stated. In 2015, of the 290 incidents, 127 of them were due to musculoskeletal disorders, 50 were because of trips or slips, and 24 incidents were the cause of a person being struck.

The emergency service department had 125 of those 290 incidents last year, compared to 152 in 2014, while public works had 153 incidents from 164 in 2014.

Over the years the city’s paramedics, firefighters and staff at the city’s Macassa and Wentworth lodges have had the worst absences during to injuries of nine days or more per year.

A few years ago councillors approved additional funding for paramedics to purchase new stretcher equipment that was expected to reduce the number of injuries to employees.

City staff said Hamilton will continue with its training and education programs that were introduced at council’s insistence over a year ago. Hamilton will also continue working with the University of Waterloo’s wellness staff to help employees reduce injuries.

 

Hamilton’s employee injury rate drops in 2015

News Apr 11, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

There was a welcome decrease in the number of Hamilton employees injured on the job in 2015 because of more education and training for staff and council’s decision to invest additional money for equipment for its emergency service personnel.

“We can’t bubble wrap everyone,” said City Manager Chris Murray. “Everything is moving in the right direction. This is a good news story.”

Still, it cost the city more money in Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) claims despite the drop in incidents, because of higher salaries, rising physician and administration fees and the additional price tag for former firefighters’ disease claims.

In 2015 the total days lost due to injuries last year was 7,497 from 8,141 in 2014, while the number of incidents were reduced from 344 in 2014 to 290 last year. The average number of days lost to injury has steadily declined from a high of 15.48 in 2013, to 9.31 in 2015.

But the WSIB costs in 2015 were $5.7 million compared to $5.6 million in 2014. The city did save about $216,000 with the reduction in injury time.

The number of injuries within the emergency and public works departments has also dropped, staff stated. In 2015, of the 290 incidents, 127 of them were due to musculoskeletal disorders, 50 were because of trips or slips, and 24 incidents were the cause of a person being struck.

The emergency service department had 125 of those 290 incidents last year, compared to 152 in 2014, while public works had 153 incidents from 164 in 2014.

Over the years the city’s paramedics, firefighters and staff at the city’s Macassa and Wentworth lodges have had the worst absences during to injuries of nine days or more per year.

A few years ago councillors approved additional funding for paramedics to purchase new stretcher equipment that was expected to reduce the number of injuries to employees.

City staff said Hamilton will continue with its training and education programs that were introduced at council’s insistence over a year ago. Hamilton will also continue working with the University of Waterloo’s wellness staff to help employees reduce injuries.

 

Hamilton’s employee injury rate drops in 2015

News Apr 11, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

There was a welcome decrease in the number of Hamilton employees injured on the job in 2015 because of more education and training for staff and council’s decision to invest additional money for equipment for its emergency service personnel.

“We can’t bubble wrap everyone,” said City Manager Chris Murray. “Everything is moving in the right direction. This is a good news story.”

Still, it cost the city more money in Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB) claims despite the drop in incidents, because of higher salaries, rising physician and administration fees and the additional price tag for former firefighters’ disease claims.

In 2015 the total days lost due to injuries last year was 7,497 from 8,141 in 2014, while the number of incidents were reduced from 344 in 2014 to 290 last year. The average number of days lost to injury has steadily declined from a high of 15.48 in 2013, to 9.31 in 2015.

But the WSIB costs in 2015 were $5.7 million compared to $5.6 million in 2014. The city did save about $216,000 with the reduction in injury time.

The number of injuries within the emergency and public works departments has also dropped, staff stated. In 2015, of the 290 incidents, 127 of them were due to musculoskeletal disorders, 50 were because of trips or slips, and 24 incidents were the cause of a person being struck.

The emergency service department had 125 of those 290 incidents last year, compared to 152 in 2014, while public works had 153 incidents from 164 in 2014.

Over the years the city’s paramedics, firefighters and staff at the city’s Macassa and Wentworth lodges have had the worst absences during to injuries of nine days or more per year.

A few years ago councillors approved additional funding for paramedics to purchase new stretcher equipment that was expected to reduce the number of injuries to employees.

City staff said Hamilton will continue with its training and education programs that were introduced at council’s insistence over a year ago. Hamilton will also continue working with the University of Waterloo’s wellness staff to help employees reduce injuries.