HWCDSB to get interactive projectors

News Apr 11, 2016 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

Schools within the Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board (HWCDSB) may soon be able to bring the next phase of smart board technology to their classrooms.

According to the report presented during the HWCDSB Committee of the Whole meeting Wednesday, Apr. 5., elementary and secondary schools in the district have the opportunity to use the Epsom BrightLink 595wi Interactive Projector in their classes through the Technology and Learning Fund (TLF) and the Specialist High Skills Major (SHSM) program grant, by the beginning of the 2016/17 school year.

“We do an assessment of all the needs of each of the schools and depending on current allocation in the schools and the different needs within the schools,” said Angelo Cortina, chief information officer who submitted the report to the board.

“Along with the schools having some to fund the insulation of the machines, that determines how the schools get allocated,” he added.

The projectors the board plans to put in place are machines, which are smaller than smartboards, that can be plugged directly into the teachers’ computers and projected onto a traditional whiteboard. The whiteboard becomes a smart board, with which students can then interact.

“We can purchase many more of them and provide them to classrooms quicker so it was a combination of meeting the needs, plus cheaper,” said Pat Daly, HWCDSB board chairperson.

During the meeting, Cortina presented statistics and figures to the committee, and noted they hope to purchase 174 units at an individual cost of $1,616. The total would come to $281,184.

The units will be purchased from Genesis Integration, which was awarded the tender back in May, 2015.

“With this purchase, we are approaching up to 75 per cent accommodations for classrooms with interactive projective technology,” he said, noting that they hoped to have every classroom at 100 per cent in the not-too-distant future.

The new technology can be used in any classroom, including those in portables, and would not require a smart board, which can be expensive and bulky, Cortina said. He explained that although the individual schools that wished to purchase the technology will be partly responsible for some of the installation fees, it isn’t a surprise to the principals.

“This is the second round through of looking at these. Communication is out, our principals are aware of this initiative and (will) be able to piggyback on initiatives such as this,” added Dave Hansen, director of education.

According Daly, the reason to put in the projectors is to not only encourage student learning but also to provide the most cost-effective, up-to-date technology available.

“A number of years ago, we put into place a technology plan and this is a part of that plan,” he said.

“We need to make sure we’re engaging (the students) and challenging them, it does all of that,” said Daly.

HWCDSB to get interactive projectors

News Apr 11, 2016 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

Schools within the Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board (HWCDSB) may soon be able to bring the next phase of smart board technology to their classrooms.

According to the report presented during the HWCDSB Committee of the Whole meeting Wednesday, Apr. 5., elementary and secondary schools in the district have the opportunity to use the Epsom BrightLink 595wi Interactive Projector in their classes through the Technology and Learning Fund (TLF) and the Specialist High Skills Major (SHSM) program grant, by the beginning of the 2016/17 school year.

“We do an assessment of all the needs of each of the schools and depending on current allocation in the schools and the different needs within the schools,” said Angelo Cortina, chief information officer who submitted the report to the board.

“Along with the schools having some to fund the insulation of the machines, that determines how the schools get allocated,” he added.

The projectors the board plans to put in place are machines, which are smaller than smartboards, that can be plugged directly into the teachers’ computers and projected onto a traditional whiteboard. The whiteboard becomes a smart board, with which students can then interact.

“We can purchase many more of them and provide them to classrooms quicker so it was a combination of meeting the needs, plus cheaper,” said Pat Daly, HWCDSB board chairperson.

During the meeting, Cortina presented statistics and figures to the committee, and noted they hope to purchase 174 units at an individual cost of $1,616. The total would come to $281,184.

The units will be purchased from Genesis Integration, which was awarded the tender back in May, 2015.

“With this purchase, we are approaching up to 75 per cent accommodations for classrooms with interactive projective technology,” he said, noting that they hoped to have every classroom at 100 per cent in the not-too-distant future.

The new technology can be used in any classroom, including those in portables, and would not require a smart board, which can be expensive and bulky, Cortina said. He explained that although the individual schools that wished to purchase the technology will be partly responsible for some of the installation fees, it isn’t a surprise to the principals.

“This is the second round through of looking at these. Communication is out, our principals are aware of this initiative and (will) be able to piggyback on initiatives such as this,” added Dave Hansen, director of education.

According Daly, the reason to put in the projectors is to not only encourage student learning but also to provide the most cost-effective, up-to-date technology available.

“A number of years ago, we put into place a technology plan and this is a part of that plan,” he said.

“We need to make sure we’re engaging (the students) and challenging them, it does all of that,” said Daly.

HWCDSB to get interactive projectors

News Apr 11, 2016 by Julia Lovett-Squires Flamborough Review

Schools within the Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board (HWCDSB) may soon be able to bring the next phase of smart board technology to their classrooms.

According to the report presented during the HWCDSB Committee of the Whole meeting Wednesday, Apr. 5., elementary and secondary schools in the district have the opportunity to use the Epsom BrightLink 595wi Interactive Projector in their classes through the Technology and Learning Fund (TLF) and the Specialist High Skills Major (SHSM) program grant, by the beginning of the 2016/17 school year.

“We do an assessment of all the needs of each of the schools and depending on current allocation in the schools and the different needs within the schools,” said Angelo Cortina, chief information officer who submitted the report to the board.

“Along with the schools having some to fund the insulation of the machines, that determines how the schools get allocated,” he added.

The projectors the board plans to put in place are machines, which are smaller than smartboards, that can be plugged directly into the teachers’ computers and projected onto a traditional whiteboard. The whiteboard becomes a smart board, with which students can then interact.

“We can purchase many more of them and provide them to classrooms quicker so it was a combination of meeting the needs, plus cheaper,” said Pat Daly, HWCDSB board chairperson.

During the meeting, Cortina presented statistics and figures to the committee, and noted they hope to purchase 174 units at an individual cost of $1,616. The total would come to $281,184.

The units will be purchased from Genesis Integration, which was awarded the tender back in May, 2015.

“With this purchase, we are approaching up to 75 per cent accommodations for classrooms with interactive projective technology,” he said, noting that they hoped to have every classroom at 100 per cent in the not-too-distant future.

The new technology can be used in any classroom, including those in portables, and would not require a smart board, which can be expensive and bulky, Cortina said. He explained that although the individual schools that wished to purchase the technology will be partly responsible for some of the installation fees, it isn’t a surprise to the principals.

“This is the second round through of looking at these. Communication is out, our principals are aware of this initiative and (will) be able to piggyback on initiatives such as this,” added Dave Hansen, director of education.

According Daly, the reason to put in the projectors is to not only encourage student learning but also to provide the most cost-effective, up-to-date technology available.

“A number of years ago, we put into place a technology plan and this is a part of that plan,” he said.

“We need to make sure we’re engaging (the students) and challenging them, it does all of that,” said Daly.