Municipal Affairs Minister wants Mississauga, Brampton and Caledon to play nice as separation debate heats up

News Apr 12, 2016 by Louie Rosella Mississauga News

Ontario’s municipal affairs minister has weighed in on the debate about Mississauga potentially leaving Peel Region.

The issue — which lay dormant for more than a decade — was re-ignited last week when Mississauga City Council passed a motion to study leaving the region. However, any decision to part ways with regional government must be approved by Queen’s Park.

In an email to The Mississauga News, Ontario Municipal Affairs Minister Ted McMeekin said he hasn’t received an official request from the City or the Region on this matter, but expects all those municipalities involved to consider the greater good.

“In general, I expect all municipalities to work together in the principle of cooperation and economic fairness. I have always believed that the best solutions are arrived at when we work together,” he wrote. “Any proposal that comes across my desk needs to take into account the effect on the entire region, including Caledon and Brampton.”

The motion to study leaving Peel was brought forward last Wednesday (April 6) by Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie and passed with an overwhelming majority.

Brampton Mayor Linda Jeffrey responded with harsh criticism, saying taxpayers have contributed to the growth and development of Mississauga for more than 30 years through the regional system.

“Brampton was there to help Mississauga as they grew and built out and now as infrastructure investments are needed in Brampton our largest partner wants to cut and run,” Jeffrey said.

Crombie said she admires and respects Jeffrey and gave her "kudos" for defending Brampton, but maintains her priority is doing what's best for Mississauga taxpayers:

The independent study will look at the long-standing issue about whether or not Mississauga, Canada's sixth largest city, should continue to be a part of the Region of Peel, which also includes Brampton and Caledon.

“We are currently undertaking a review of the governance of the Region of Peel and I think it is important that Council and the residents of Mississauga understand what Regional governance means for them and whether a change would mean a better deal for Mississauga. An independent study will provide us with clarity and all of the facts needed to make an informed decision about our place in the Region of Peel,” Crombie said. “I think it is critically important that we control our own destiny and that we are able to make decisions that are in the best interests of Mississauga residents. I look forward to seeing the results of this study and to speaking further with residents about their vision for the future of Mississauga.

Crombie added that, if the study supports it, separation from Peel should be on the ballot as a referendum item in the 2018 election.

Back in 2004, then-mayor Hazel McCallion led a campaign asking Queen’s Park to separate Mississauga from Peel region and become a stand-alone municipality. She and others have  maintained the city contributes more money to the region than its counterparts in Brampton and Caledon and that the city is far too big to be in a two-tier system of government, with tens of millions of dollars wasted each year because of the duplication in services.

In 2006, the provincial government passed legislation that revised the composition of Peel council, assigning an additional seat to Brampton and two additional seats to Mississauga.

Municipal Affairs Minister wants Mississauga, Brampton and Caledon to play nice as separation debate heats up

Ted McMeekin says province must approve any decision to secede

News Apr 12, 2016 by Louie Rosella Mississauga News

Ontario’s municipal affairs minister has weighed in on the debate about Mississauga potentially leaving Peel Region.

The issue — which lay dormant for more than a decade — was re-ignited last week when Mississauga City Council passed a motion to study leaving the region. However, any decision to part ways with regional government must be approved by Queen’s Park.

In an email to The Mississauga News, Ontario Municipal Affairs Minister Ted McMeekin said he hasn’t received an official request from the City or the Region on this matter, but expects all those municipalities involved to consider the greater good.

“In general, I expect all municipalities to work together in the principle of cooperation and economic fairness. I have always believed that the best solutions are arrived at when we work together,” he wrote. “Any proposal that comes across my desk needs to take into account the effect on the entire region, including Caledon and Brampton.”

The motion to study leaving Peel was brought forward last Wednesday (April 6) by Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie and passed with an overwhelming majority.

Brampton Mayor Linda Jeffrey responded with harsh criticism, saying taxpayers have contributed to the growth and development of Mississauga for more than 30 years through the regional system.

“Brampton was there to help Mississauga as they grew and built out and now as infrastructure investments are needed in Brampton our largest partner wants to cut and run,” Jeffrey said.

Crombie said she admires and respects Jeffrey and gave her "kudos" for defending Brampton, but maintains her priority is doing what's best for Mississauga taxpayers:

The independent study will look at the long-standing issue about whether or not Mississauga, Canada's sixth largest city, should continue to be a part of the Region of Peel, which also includes Brampton and Caledon.

“We are currently undertaking a review of the governance of the Region of Peel and I think it is important that Council and the residents of Mississauga understand what Regional governance means for them and whether a change would mean a better deal for Mississauga. An independent study will provide us with clarity and all of the facts needed to make an informed decision about our place in the Region of Peel,” Crombie said. “I think it is critically important that we control our own destiny and that we are able to make decisions that are in the best interests of Mississauga residents. I look forward to seeing the results of this study and to speaking further with residents about their vision for the future of Mississauga.

Crombie added that, if the study supports it, separation from Peel should be on the ballot as a referendum item in the 2018 election.

Back in 2004, then-mayor Hazel McCallion led a campaign asking Queen’s Park to separate Mississauga from Peel region and become a stand-alone municipality. She and others have  maintained the city contributes more money to the region than its counterparts in Brampton and Caledon and that the city is far too big to be in a two-tier system of government, with tens of millions of dollars wasted each year because of the duplication in services.

In 2006, the provincial government passed legislation that revised the composition of Peel council, assigning an additional seat to Brampton and two additional seats to Mississauga.

Municipal Affairs Minister wants Mississauga, Brampton and Caledon to play nice as separation debate heats up

Ted McMeekin says province must approve any decision to secede

News Apr 12, 2016 by Louie Rosella Mississauga News

Ontario’s municipal affairs minister has weighed in on the debate about Mississauga potentially leaving Peel Region.

The issue — which lay dormant for more than a decade — was re-ignited last week when Mississauga City Council passed a motion to study leaving the region. However, any decision to part ways with regional government must be approved by Queen’s Park.

In an email to The Mississauga News, Ontario Municipal Affairs Minister Ted McMeekin said he hasn’t received an official request from the City or the Region on this matter, but expects all those municipalities involved to consider the greater good.

“In general, I expect all municipalities to work together in the principle of cooperation and economic fairness. I have always believed that the best solutions are arrived at when we work together,” he wrote. “Any proposal that comes across my desk needs to take into account the effect on the entire region, including Caledon and Brampton.”

The motion to study leaving Peel was brought forward last Wednesday (April 6) by Mississauga Mayor Bonnie Crombie and passed with an overwhelming majority.

Brampton Mayor Linda Jeffrey responded with harsh criticism, saying taxpayers have contributed to the growth and development of Mississauga for more than 30 years through the regional system.

“Brampton was there to help Mississauga as they grew and built out and now as infrastructure investments are needed in Brampton our largest partner wants to cut and run,” Jeffrey said.

Crombie said she admires and respects Jeffrey and gave her "kudos" for defending Brampton, but maintains her priority is doing what's best for Mississauga taxpayers:

The independent study will look at the long-standing issue about whether or not Mississauga, Canada's sixth largest city, should continue to be a part of the Region of Peel, which also includes Brampton and Caledon.

“We are currently undertaking a review of the governance of the Region of Peel and I think it is important that Council and the residents of Mississauga understand what Regional governance means for them and whether a change would mean a better deal for Mississauga. An independent study will provide us with clarity and all of the facts needed to make an informed decision about our place in the Region of Peel,” Crombie said. “I think it is critically important that we control our own destiny and that we are able to make decisions that are in the best interests of Mississauga residents. I look forward to seeing the results of this study and to speaking further with residents about their vision for the future of Mississauga.

Crombie added that, if the study supports it, separation from Peel should be on the ballot as a referendum item in the 2018 election.

Back in 2004, then-mayor Hazel McCallion led a campaign asking Queen’s Park to separate Mississauga from Peel region and become a stand-alone municipality. She and others have  maintained the city contributes more money to the region than its counterparts in Brampton and Caledon and that the city is far too big to be in a two-tier system of government, with tens of millions of dollars wasted each year because of the duplication in services.

In 2006, the provincial government passed legislation that revised the composition of Peel council, assigning an additional seat to Brampton and two additional seats to Mississauga.