CLAIRMONT: Did being a nice guy seal Tim Bosma’s fate?

News Apr 13, 2016 by Susan Clairmont The Hamilton Spectator

Hank and Mary Bosma raised their son Tim to work hard, go to church and be a nice guy.

Sharlene fell in love with Tim, married him, started a family with him and dreamt about forever with him because he was a nice guy.

Friends would drop by to have a beer with Tim, smoke a cigar with him and laugh with him because he was a nice guy.

And when Tim vanished, countless strangers searched for him and hoped and prayed for him because they somehow intrinsically knew that this missing man was a nice guy.

A nice guy with a diesel Dodge Ram pickup for sale.

The sickening, messed up, terrible irony here is that if Tim hadn't been such a nice guy, he might still be alive.

Should he steal the truck from the "asshole or the nice guy," accused killer Dellen Millard asked his roommate the day before Tim was abducted, court heard.

It seems likely that the nice guy in that equation was Tim.

The thought that Tim's fatal flaw was his niceness was obviously painful for his family as they listened, heads bowed, from their usual front row seats in the courtroom.

Millard, 30, and his former friend Mark Smich, 28, are on trial for Tim's first-degree murder. On May 6, 2013, Tim took two men for a test drive of the truck he was selling. He never came home. The Crown's theory is that he was shot in his truck and then his body cremated in a livestock incinerator called The Eliminator.

From the witness stand Tuesday, Millard's housemate Andrew Michalski recalled a conversation they had in their Etobicoke kitchen a couple of days before Tim vanished. Millard was showing him Kijiji ads on a computer. One was for a 3500 black Dodge Ram pickup truck. Tim had posted just such an ad.

Millard had "made a couple of phone calls" about buying trucks, testified Michalski.

"He asked me if he should steal it from the asshole or the nice guy," he said.

Millard told him he was going for a test drive the following day.

The jury has already heard from Igor Tumanenko, a muscular former Israeli soldier with a strong presence and abrupt manner, who took two men for a test drive of his Dodge Ram diesel pickup on May 5. An agreed statement of facts has established Smich was one of those men.

Court has also heard Tim was excited at the notion of showing his pickup to a prospective buyer coming from Etobicoke. He anxiously gussied it up as he awaited the buyer's arrival.

Two men finally showed up at Bosma's rural Ancaster home at dusk on May 6. Tim met them in the driveway, pleasant and polite.

As Sharlene watched, her affable husband reached out to shake the hand of the taller man. The Crown believes that man was Millard, and that within minutes of the three men driving off, Tim would be dead.

To think that it may have been that welcoming handshake that sealed the nice guy's fate.

Susan Clairmont’s commentary appears regularly in The Spectator. sclairmont@thespec.com

905-526-3539 | @susanclairmont

CLAIRMONT: Did being a nice guy seal Tim Bosma’s fate?

News Apr 13, 2016 by Susan Clairmont The Hamilton Spectator

Hank and Mary Bosma raised their son Tim to work hard, go to church and be a nice guy.

Sharlene fell in love with Tim, married him, started a family with him and dreamt about forever with him because he was a nice guy.

Friends would drop by to have a beer with Tim, smoke a cigar with him and laugh with him because he was a nice guy.

And when Tim vanished, countless strangers searched for him and hoped and prayed for him because they somehow intrinsically knew that this missing man was a nice guy.

A nice guy with a diesel Dodge Ram pickup for sale.

The sickening, messed up, terrible irony here is that if Tim hadn't been such a nice guy, he might still be alive.

Should he steal the truck from the "asshole or the nice guy," accused killer Dellen Millard asked his roommate the day before Tim was abducted, court heard.

It seems likely that the nice guy in that equation was Tim.

The thought that Tim's fatal flaw was his niceness was obviously painful for his family as they listened, heads bowed, from their usual front row seats in the courtroom.

Millard, 30, and his former friend Mark Smich, 28, are on trial for Tim's first-degree murder. On May 6, 2013, Tim took two men for a test drive of the truck he was selling. He never came home. The Crown's theory is that he was shot in his truck and then his body cremated in a livestock incinerator called The Eliminator.

From the witness stand Tuesday, Millard's housemate Andrew Michalski recalled a conversation they had in their Etobicoke kitchen a couple of days before Tim vanished. Millard was showing him Kijiji ads on a computer. One was for a 3500 black Dodge Ram pickup truck. Tim had posted just such an ad.

Millard had "made a couple of phone calls" about buying trucks, testified Michalski.

"He asked me if he should steal it from the asshole or the nice guy," he said.

Millard told him he was going for a test drive the following day.

The jury has already heard from Igor Tumanenko, a muscular former Israeli soldier with a strong presence and abrupt manner, who took two men for a test drive of his Dodge Ram diesel pickup on May 5. An agreed statement of facts has established Smich was one of those men.

Court has also heard Tim was excited at the notion of showing his pickup to a prospective buyer coming from Etobicoke. He anxiously gussied it up as he awaited the buyer's arrival.

Two men finally showed up at Bosma's rural Ancaster home at dusk on May 6. Tim met them in the driveway, pleasant and polite.

As Sharlene watched, her affable husband reached out to shake the hand of the taller man. The Crown believes that man was Millard, and that within minutes of the three men driving off, Tim would be dead.

To think that it may have been that welcoming handshake that sealed the nice guy's fate.

Susan Clairmont’s commentary appears regularly in The Spectator. sclairmont@thespec.com

905-526-3539 | @susanclairmont

CLAIRMONT: Did being a nice guy seal Tim Bosma’s fate?

News Apr 13, 2016 by Susan Clairmont The Hamilton Spectator

Hank and Mary Bosma raised their son Tim to work hard, go to church and be a nice guy.

Sharlene fell in love with Tim, married him, started a family with him and dreamt about forever with him because he was a nice guy.

Friends would drop by to have a beer with Tim, smoke a cigar with him and laugh with him because he was a nice guy.

And when Tim vanished, countless strangers searched for him and hoped and prayed for him because they somehow intrinsically knew that this missing man was a nice guy.

A nice guy with a diesel Dodge Ram pickup for sale.

The sickening, messed up, terrible irony here is that if Tim hadn't been such a nice guy, he might still be alive.

Should he steal the truck from the "asshole or the nice guy," accused killer Dellen Millard asked his roommate the day before Tim was abducted, court heard.

It seems likely that the nice guy in that equation was Tim.

The thought that Tim's fatal flaw was his niceness was obviously painful for his family as they listened, heads bowed, from their usual front row seats in the courtroom.

Millard, 30, and his former friend Mark Smich, 28, are on trial for Tim's first-degree murder. On May 6, 2013, Tim took two men for a test drive of the truck he was selling. He never came home. The Crown's theory is that he was shot in his truck and then his body cremated in a livestock incinerator called The Eliminator.

From the witness stand Tuesday, Millard's housemate Andrew Michalski recalled a conversation they had in their Etobicoke kitchen a couple of days before Tim vanished. Millard was showing him Kijiji ads on a computer. One was for a 3500 black Dodge Ram pickup truck. Tim had posted just such an ad.

Millard had "made a couple of phone calls" about buying trucks, testified Michalski.

"He asked me if he should steal it from the asshole or the nice guy," he said.

Millard told him he was going for a test drive the following day.

The jury has already heard from Igor Tumanenko, a muscular former Israeli soldier with a strong presence and abrupt manner, who took two men for a test drive of his Dodge Ram diesel pickup on May 5. An agreed statement of facts has established Smich was one of those men.

Court has also heard Tim was excited at the notion of showing his pickup to a prospective buyer coming from Etobicoke. He anxiously gussied it up as he awaited the buyer's arrival.

Two men finally showed up at Bosma's rural Ancaster home at dusk on May 6. Tim met them in the driveway, pleasant and polite.

As Sharlene watched, her affable husband reached out to shake the hand of the taller man. The Crown believes that man was Millard, and that within minutes of the three men driving off, Tim would be dead.

To think that it may have been that welcoming handshake that sealed the nice guy's fate.

Susan Clairmont’s commentary appears regularly in The Spectator. sclairmont@thespec.com

905-526-3539 | @susanclairmont