Students talk their way to the top at Oral Communications Festival

News Apr 15, 2016 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

The top public speakers from several Flamborough elementary schools were vying for a place in board competition during the Oral Communication Festival April 8 at Allan A. Greenleaf Elementary School.

The first- and second-place finishers in each division will compete against the rest of the board May 9 at the HWDSB Education Centre.

In the junior division, Aisha Mahmoud of Ancaster’s Fessenden Elementary took home first place with a speech about racism, while Rousseau’s Chloe Braun was second with a speech about gender bias in toys.

In the intermediate division, Balaclava’s Versaiha Kahnamoui took home top honours with her speech about what it takes to be a champion, while Ancaster Meadow’s Amber Carroll was second with her speech about euthanasia.

Mahmoud said it was her second time competing at the event. She felt she really improved in her second completion. “I’m very excited to compete at the board level,” she said.

Kahnamoui said she was disappointed there were only two competitors in the intermediate division. “It seems like people stopped caring,” she said.

The Grade 7 student said she needs to fine-tune her speech in order to place well at the board level. “I think I need to memorize more and add more emotion,” she said.

Judge AJ Ingrassia, an instructional coach with the board, said all of the performances were terrific.

“They were all highly entertaining,” he said. “It was great to see speakers with such talent.”

He noted that despite the lower numbers of intermediate speakers, public speaking competitions and the skillset they require still have value. “We want to acknowledge the skills it takes to speak publicly,” he said. “It still has value and merit.”

While he noted students are given marks for their delivery, they also earn points for the content and research involved in their speeches.

Following each speech, the contestant was asked several questions about his or her topic.

Sue MacLachlan, a special assignment teacher and librarian with board, served as the questioner.

“I’m always impressed with the depth of knowledge the students have,” she said. “And their poise in getting up in front of a bunch of strangers and speaking.”

Students talk their way to the top at Oral Communications Festival

Waterdown's Allan A. Greenleaf hosts HWDSB public speaking event

News Apr 15, 2016 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

The top public speakers from several Flamborough elementary schools were vying for a place in board competition during the Oral Communication Festival April 8 at Allan A. Greenleaf Elementary School.

The first- and second-place finishers in each division will compete against the rest of the board May 9 at the HWDSB Education Centre.

In the junior division, Aisha Mahmoud of Ancaster’s Fessenden Elementary took home first place with a speech about racism, while Rousseau’s Chloe Braun was second with a speech about gender bias in toys.

In the intermediate division, Balaclava’s Versaiha Kahnamoui took home top honours with her speech about what it takes to be a champion, while Ancaster Meadow’s Amber Carroll was second with her speech about euthanasia.

Mahmoud said it was her second time competing at the event. She felt she really improved in her second completion. “I’m very excited to compete at the board level,” she said.

Kahnamoui said she was disappointed there were only two competitors in the intermediate division. “It seems like people stopped caring,” she said.

The Grade 7 student said she needs to fine-tune her speech in order to place well at the board level. “I think I need to memorize more and add more emotion,” she said.

Judge AJ Ingrassia, an instructional coach with the board, said all of the performances were terrific.

“They were all highly entertaining,” he said. “It was great to see speakers with such talent.”

He noted that despite the lower numbers of intermediate speakers, public speaking competitions and the skillset they require still have value. “We want to acknowledge the skills it takes to speak publicly,” he said. “It still has value and merit.”

While he noted students are given marks for their delivery, they also earn points for the content and research involved in their speeches.

Following each speech, the contestant was asked several questions about his or her topic.

Sue MacLachlan, a special assignment teacher and librarian with board, served as the questioner.

“I’m always impressed with the depth of knowledge the students have,” she said. “And their poise in getting up in front of a bunch of strangers and speaking.”

Students talk their way to the top at Oral Communications Festival

Waterdown's Allan A. Greenleaf hosts HWDSB public speaking event

News Apr 15, 2016 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

The top public speakers from several Flamborough elementary schools were vying for a place in board competition during the Oral Communication Festival April 8 at Allan A. Greenleaf Elementary School.

The first- and second-place finishers in each division will compete against the rest of the board May 9 at the HWDSB Education Centre.

In the junior division, Aisha Mahmoud of Ancaster’s Fessenden Elementary took home first place with a speech about racism, while Rousseau’s Chloe Braun was second with a speech about gender bias in toys.

In the intermediate division, Balaclava’s Versaiha Kahnamoui took home top honours with her speech about what it takes to be a champion, while Ancaster Meadow’s Amber Carroll was second with her speech about euthanasia.

Mahmoud said it was her second time competing at the event. She felt she really improved in her second completion. “I’m very excited to compete at the board level,” she said.

Kahnamoui said she was disappointed there were only two competitors in the intermediate division. “It seems like people stopped caring,” she said.

The Grade 7 student said she needs to fine-tune her speech in order to place well at the board level. “I think I need to memorize more and add more emotion,” she said.

Judge AJ Ingrassia, an instructional coach with the board, said all of the performances were terrific.

“They were all highly entertaining,” he said. “It was great to see speakers with such talent.”

He noted that despite the lower numbers of intermediate speakers, public speaking competitions and the skillset they require still have value. “We want to acknowledge the skills it takes to speak publicly,” he said. “It still has value and merit.”

While he noted students are given marks for their delivery, they also earn points for the content and research involved in their speeches.

Following each speech, the contestant was asked several questions about his or her topic.

Sue MacLachlan, a special assignment teacher and librarian with board, served as the questioner.

“I’m always impressed with the depth of knowledge the students have,” she said. “And their poise in getting up in front of a bunch of strangers and speaking.”