Trudeau lauds Perimeter’s ‘cutting-edge research’

News Apr 15, 2016 by Jeff Outhit Waterloo Region Record

WATERLOO — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau came to town to put a bow on what his federal government has already promised: another $50 million in funding for a prominent think tank.

In March, the Liberal government announced the latest funding for the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, to be spread over five years.

"This investment will help drive the important work being done here at the institute, and will securely place Canada among the forefront of the kind of cutting-edge research that we see, and that quite frankly the world needs," Trudeau said Friday while visiting the research institute.

A crowd of 200 high school girls watched and waved to the prime minister. They were visiting the institute as part of a mentorship program.

Trudeau headed to Cambridge later Friday to tour a business, Canadian General-Tower Limited. It makes plastic sheeting for a number of industries.

With this latest government funding, provincial and federal taxpayers have put $336 million into the Perimeter research institute since 2002 according to its website. Private donations exceed $228 million. The think tank was founded by BlackBerry co-founder Mike Lazaridis.

Trudeau told the Perimeter audience that he understands the local desire for better transportation between Waterloo Region and Toronto. He said his government would be a partner, citing better Via Rail trains, better GO Transit commuter trains, and better highways, but would not commit to a specific proposal or to high-speed trains.

"We have a broad range of transportation solutions being proposed," he said.

He described his government's relations with First Nations, saying "the path forward from here on is together, not apart."

Perimeter researchers applauded the latest federal funding and used the visit to pitch the institute, which uses big private donations and top salaries to recruit world-class researchers who study the origins of the universe.

"Together, we have built a talent magnet, attracting the brightest, most motivated young people from around the world, to tackle some of the most ambitious and challenging problems in science," said Perimeter director Neil Turok, who ranks among the highest-paid scholars in Ontario.

jouthit@therecord.com

Trudeau lauds Perimeter’s ‘cutting-edge research’

News Apr 15, 2016 by Jeff Outhit Waterloo Region Record

WATERLOO — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau came to town to put a bow on what his federal government has already promised: another $50 million in funding for a prominent think tank.

In March, the Liberal government announced the latest funding for the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, to be spread over five years.

"This investment will help drive the important work being done here at the institute, and will securely place Canada among the forefront of the kind of cutting-edge research that we see, and that quite frankly the world needs," Trudeau said Friday while visiting the research institute.

A crowd of 200 high school girls watched and waved to the prime minister. They were visiting the institute as part of a mentorship program.

Trudeau headed to Cambridge later Friday to tour a business, Canadian General-Tower Limited. It makes plastic sheeting for a number of industries.

With this latest government funding, provincial and federal taxpayers have put $336 million into the Perimeter research institute since 2002 according to its website. Private donations exceed $228 million. The think tank was founded by BlackBerry co-founder Mike Lazaridis.

Trudeau told the Perimeter audience that he understands the local desire for better transportation between Waterloo Region and Toronto. He said his government would be a partner, citing better Via Rail trains, better GO Transit commuter trains, and better highways, but would not commit to a specific proposal or to high-speed trains.

"We have a broad range of transportation solutions being proposed," he said.

He described his government's relations with First Nations, saying "the path forward from here on is together, not apart."

Perimeter researchers applauded the latest federal funding and used the visit to pitch the institute, which uses big private donations and top salaries to recruit world-class researchers who study the origins of the universe.

"Together, we have built a talent magnet, attracting the brightest, most motivated young people from around the world, to tackle some of the most ambitious and challenging problems in science," said Perimeter director Neil Turok, who ranks among the highest-paid scholars in Ontario.

jouthit@therecord.com

Trudeau lauds Perimeter’s ‘cutting-edge research’

News Apr 15, 2016 by Jeff Outhit Waterloo Region Record

WATERLOO — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau came to town to put a bow on what his federal government has already promised: another $50 million in funding for a prominent think tank.

In March, the Liberal government announced the latest funding for the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, to be spread over five years.

"This investment will help drive the important work being done here at the institute, and will securely place Canada among the forefront of the kind of cutting-edge research that we see, and that quite frankly the world needs," Trudeau said Friday while visiting the research institute.

A crowd of 200 high school girls watched and waved to the prime minister. They were visiting the institute as part of a mentorship program.

Trudeau headed to Cambridge later Friday to tour a business, Canadian General-Tower Limited. It makes plastic sheeting for a number of industries.

With this latest government funding, provincial and federal taxpayers have put $336 million into the Perimeter research institute since 2002 according to its website. Private donations exceed $228 million. The think tank was founded by BlackBerry co-founder Mike Lazaridis.

Trudeau told the Perimeter audience that he understands the local desire for better transportation between Waterloo Region and Toronto. He said his government would be a partner, citing better Via Rail trains, better GO Transit commuter trains, and better highways, but would not commit to a specific proposal or to high-speed trains.

"We have a broad range of transportation solutions being proposed," he said.

He described his government's relations with First Nations, saying "the path forward from here on is together, not apart."

Perimeter researchers applauded the latest federal funding and used the visit to pitch the institute, which uses big private donations and top salaries to recruit world-class researchers who study the origins of the universe.

"Together, we have built a talent magnet, attracting the brightest, most motivated young people from around the world, to tackle some of the most ambitious and challenging problems in science," said Perimeter director Neil Turok, who ranks among the highest-paid scholars in Ontario.

jouthit@therecord.com