Ontario launches jobs program in Hamilton to help people with disabilities

News Apr 15, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

A $4-million Ontario jobs program, the first one in Canada, that partners with the private sector to help hire people with disabilities and who have difficult employment histories was introduced April 15 in downtown Hamilton.

Magnus Sandberg, vice-president and general manager of the Social Capital Partners, said the programs innovative idea is the establishment of what is called the rate drop rebate program that encourages small to medium-sized businesses to hire up to four new employees.

Sandberg said a business will receive a lower interest rate of 1 per cent for each new employee hired, up to a four-per-cent reduction. The business will also receive an interest-free line of credit for up to six months. The program caps the funding a business can receive at $200,000.

“We are setting up businesses to grow,” said Sandberg, during a news conference at the YMCA’s Employment Centre on Main Street.

Hamilton Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin said the provincial government needs to “connect the dots” with the private sector in order to get things done.

He said there are “so many folks” with disabilities who want to work and have the necessary tools but employers won’t give them a chance.

McMeekin said some businesses who have hired people with so-called barriers say “they are the very best workers. They make a real contribution. But there are some stereotypes, and fears about taking a chance. We don’t want talented Ontarians to be overlooked.”

There are 15 employment centres in Hamilton that will be partnering with the province and Social Capital Partner under this program. Sandberg said people interested will be pre-screened before they interview for a job at a business involved in the program.

Sandberg said there is no criteria for a business to hire a person with a disability, but “that is not the scenario we were hoping for.

“We will provide a financial incentive for the first four employees,” he said. “Then we believe we have proven ourselves and the effectiveness of the hiring channel.”

The two-year pilot program, which was introduced in Hamilton, London and Ottawa on April 11, is expected to help up to 1,100 people and 500 businesses in total. For Hamilton, the projections are to hire up to 400 people assist about 185 businesses. The program will cost about $4 million, with three million dollars distributed to the three municipalities.

Sandberg said Hamilton’s $1 million loans will be available at such institutions as CIBC, First Ontario Credit Union, Libro Credit Union and Meridian for one year.

He said $1 million of the funding will be used to hire staff, establish an infrastructure and market the program. Social Capital Partners will not receive any portion of the money, he said.

“We are doing (this program) pro bono,” said Sandberg.

Eventually, said Sandberg, he would like to see the program expanded across Canada within two years.

 

Ontario launches jobs program in Hamilton to help people with disabilities

News Apr 15, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

A $4-million Ontario jobs program, the first one in Canada, that partners with the private sector to help hire people with disabilities and who have difficult employment histories was introduced April 15 in downtown Hamilton.

Magnus Sandberg, vice-president and general manager of the Social Capital Partners, said the programs innovative idea is the establishment of what is called the rate drop rebate program that encourages small to medium-sized businesses to hire up to four new employees.

Sandberg said a business will receive a lower interest rate of 1 per cent for each new employee hired, up to a four-per-cent reduction. The business will also receive an interest-free line of credit for up to six months. The program caps the funding a business can receive at $200,000.

“We are setting up businesses to grow,” said Sandberg, during a news conference at the YMCA’s Employment Centre on Main Street.

Hamilton Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin said the provincial government needs to “connect the dots” with the private sector in order to get things done.

He said there are “so many folks” with disabilities who want to work and have the necessary tools but employers won’t give them a chance.

McMeekin said some businesses who have hired people with so-called barriers say “they are the very best workers. They make a real contribution. But there are some stereotypes, and fears about taking a chance. We don’t want talented Ontarians to be overlooked.”

There are 15 employment centres in Hamilton that will be partnering with the province and Social Capital Partner under this program. Sandberg said people interested will be pre-screened before they interview for a job at a business involved in the program.

Sandberg said there is no criteria for a business to hire a person with a disability, but “that is not the scenario we were hoping for.

“We will provide a financial incentive for the first four employees,” he said. “Then we believe we have proven ourselves and the effectiveness of the hiring channel.”

The two-year pilot program, which was introduced in Hamilton, London and Ottawa on April 11, is expected to help up to 1,100 people and 500 businesses in total. For Hamilton, the projections are to hire up to 400 people assist about 185 businesses. The program will cost about $4 million, with three million dollars distributed to the three municipalities.

Sandberg said Hamilton’s $1 million loans will be available at such institutions as CIBC, First Ontario Credit Union, Libro Credit Union and Meridian for one year.

He said $1 million of the funding will be used to hire staff, establish an infrastructure and market the program. Social Capital Partners will not receive any portion of the money, he said.

“We are doing (this program) pro bono,” said Sandberg.

Eventually, said Sandberg, he would like to see the program expanded across Canada within two years.

 

Ontario launches jobs program in Hamilton to help people with disabilities

News Apr 15, 2016 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

A $4-million Ontario jobs program, the first one in Canada, that partners with the private sector to help hire people with disabilities and who have difficult employment histories was introduced April 15 in downtown Hamilton.

Magnus Sandberg, vice-president and general manager of the Social Capital Partners, said the programs innovative idea is the establishment of what is called the rate drop rebate program that encourages small to medium-sized businesses to hire up to four new employees.

Sandberg said a business will receive a lower interest rate of 1 per cent for each new employee hired, up to a four-per-cent reduction. The business will also receive an interest-free line of credit for up to six months. The program caps the funding a business can receive at $200,000.

“We are setting up businesses to grow,” said Sandberg, during a news conference at the YMCA’s Employment Centre on Main Street.

Hamilton Liberal MPP Ted McMeekin said the provincial government needs to “connect the dots” with the private sector in order to get things done.

He said there are “so many folks” with disabilities who want to work and have the necessary tools but employers won’t give them a chance.

McMeekin said some businesses who have hired people with so-called barriers say “they are the very best workers. They make a real contribution. But there are some stereotypes, and fears about taking a chance. We don’t want talented Ontarians to be overlooked.”

There are 15 employment centres in Hamilton that will be partnering with the province and Social Capital Partner under this program. Sandberg said people interested will be pre-screened before they interview for a job at a business involved in the program.

Sandberg said there is no criteria for a business to hire a person with a disability, but “that is not the scenario we were hoping for.

“We will provide a financial incentive for the first four employees,” he said. “Then we believe we have proven ourselves and the effectiveness of the hiring channel.”

The two-year pilot program, which was introduced in Hamilton, London and Ottawa on April 11, is expected to help up to 1,100 people and 500 businesses in total. For Hamilton, the projections are to hire up to 400 people assist about 185 businesses. The program will cost about $4 million, with three million dollars distributed to the three municipalities.

Sandberg said Hamilton’s $1 million loans will be available at such institutions as CIBC, First Ontario Credit Union, Libro Credit Union and Meridian for one year.

He said $1 million of the funding will be used to hire staff, establish an infrastructure and market the program. Social Capital Partners will not receive any portion of the money, he said.

“We are doing (this program) pro bono,” said Sandberg.

Eventually, said Sandberg, he would like to see the program expanded across Canada within two years.