Carlisle students plant ideas for natural space

News Jun 23, 2016 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Next fall, the gardens at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Catholic Elementary School will look a bit different from a standard garden – the beds will be stocked with native, water conserving plants.

The planting project, said OLMC principal Angela Wintar, was instituted in response to the water usage and supply issues plaguing the Carlisle community.

Wintar noted the Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board’s Religion and Family Life program leader Dr. Paul Beaudette originally broached the project to her.

She noted the city had reached out to Beaudette as a result of the water issues.

“They really felt that the way to reach the parents was through educating the kids,” she said. “So would we be willing to be a pilot school for this? I said, ‘For sure.’”

Chris Wilson, the customer service and community outreach project manager for Hamilton Water, said the school initiative is part of the overall conservation program in Carlisle. “We have a lot of people coming in and out of the school, kind of a community centre, and it’s a great opportunity for people to look, touch, feel and smell some of these native plants,” he explained.

Wintar said the project is meant to utilize the school’s garden spaces as demonstration gardens for drought tolerant plants and species, as well as alternatives to grass, such as eco grass or groundcover. The plants will be labeled to explain each species.

The gardens will be planted in the fall because the new plants would be hard to maintain over the summer vacation when no one is at the school. “We’re going to start from scratch in September,” Wintar said.

The gardens on each side of the main entrance to the school will be replanted with a variety of plants that are native to the area. These include grasses and ground covers, as well burning bushes, green pillar pin oak, Canadian Serviceberry, hostas and butterfly bush groupings.

Four smaller garden plots will be replanted as fusion gardens – gardens that only use plants found naturally in southern Ontario. These were designed by students as part of a school-wide contest, with the four winning designs – chosen from 70 submissions – being planted in the fall.

Students were given a list of natural plants and had to draw a rendering of their proposed garden, as well as a rationale for why they chose the plants that they did. The students who submitted the winning designs were Grade 8 student Ashley Zanatta, senior kindergarten student Kaleb Rampersad, Grade 5 pupil Alana King and siblings Dylan and Olivia MacLean, in Grade 2 and 1 respectively.

King noted she was excited about the project. “I like the prairie smoke,” she said of the pink coloured wildflower. “I put it at the back of the garden because it’s the tallest.”

Wintar noted Rob Richarz, the city’s project manager of outreach and education, spoke to the students about water usage at a May assembly and initiated the design contest.

“How much water we use, how much water it takes when you leave the tap running when you’re brushing your teeth – that sort of thing,” she said of the talk. “Then he talked about why we need to save water.”

Each student-deisgned plot will be adorned with a sign in their own writing and their divisions will be responsible for planting and maintaining it.

Wintar noted one of the challenges facing the project is that many of the naturally occurring plants are not available at area garden centres. Andrew Bryl, a Grade 7 teacher at the school, is the school’s eco rep and a member of the Catholic School Council’s Greening Committee. He said the garden will promote the different kinds of plants.

“It will be like a showcase for the community and show parents the possibilities,” he said. “Our hope is we can create a demand for these types of plants.”

Next year, the school plans to include more formal education related to the project, such as water usage and the role of shade trees.

Wintar said including more of an educational component next year dovetails nicely, as the students will be able to see the physical gardens at that point.

Wintar added there has been a lot of parent buy-in to the idea.

“Kids are the ones who make the difference,” she said. “They’re the ones who go home with the information and parents buy into it.”

Carlisle students plant ideas for natural space

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel to install water-conserving gardens

News Jun 23, 2016 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Next fall, the gardens at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Catholic Elementary School will look a bit different from a standard garden – the beds will be stocked with native, water conserving plants.

The planting project, said OLMC principal Angela Wintar, was instituted in response to the water usage and supply issues plaguing the Carlisle community.

Wintar noted the Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board’s Religion and Family Life program leader Dr. Paul Beaudette originally broached the project to her.

She noted the city had reached out to Beaudette as a result of the water issues.

"Our hope is we can create a demand for these types of plants.”

“They really felt that the way to reach the parents was through educating the kids,” she said. “So would we be willing to be a pilot school for this? I said, ‘For sure.’”

Chris Wilson, the customer service and community outreach project manager for Hamilton Water, said the school initiative is part of the overall conservation program in Carlisle. “We have a lot of people coming in and out of the school, kind of a community centre, and it’s a great opportunity for people to look, touch, feel and smell some of these native plants,” he explained.

Wintar said the project is meant to utilize the school’s garden spaces as demonstration gardens for drought tolerant plants and species, as well as alternatives to grass, such as eco grass or groundcover. The plants will be labeled to explain each species.

The gardens will be planted in the fall because the new plants would be hard to maintain over the summer vacation when no one is at the school. “We’re going to start from scratch in September,” Wintar said.

The gardens on each side of the main entrance to the school will be replanted with a variety of plants that are native to the area. These include grasses and ground covers, as well burning bushes, green pillar pin oak, Canadian Serviceberry, hostas and butterfly bush groupings.

Four smaller garden plots will be replanted as fusion gardens – gardens that only use plants found naturally in southern Ontario. These were designed by students as part of a school-wide contest, with the four winning designs – chosen from 70 submissions – being planted in the fall.

Students were given a list of natural plants and had to draw a rendering of their proposed garden, as well as a rationale for why they chose the plants that they did. The students who submitted the winning designs were Grade 8 student Ashley Zanatta, senior kindergarten student Kaleb Rampersad, Grade 5 pupil Alana King and siblings Dylan and Olivia MacLean, in Grade 2 and 1 respectively.

King noted she was excited about the project. “I like the prairie smoke,” she said of the pink coloured wildflower. “I put it at the back of the garden because it’s the tallest.”

Wintar noted Rob Richarz, the city’s project manager of outreach and education, spoke to the students about water usage at a May assembly and initiated the design contest.

“How much water we use, how much water it takes when you leave the tap running when you’re brushing your teeth – that sort of thing,” she said of the talk. “Then he talked about why we need to save water.”

Each student-deisgned plot will be adorned with a sign in their own writing and their divisions will be responsible for planting and maintaining it.

Wintar noted one of the challenges facing the project is that many of the naturally occurring plants are not available at area garden centres. Andrew Bryl, a Grade 7 teacher at the school, is the school’s eco rep and a member of the Catholic School Council’s Greening Committee. He said the garden will promote the different kinds of plants.

“It will be like a showcase for the community and show parents the possibilities,” he said. “Our hope is we can create a demand for these types of plants.”

Next year, the school plans to include more formal education related to the project, such as water usage and the role of shade trees.

Wintar said including more of an educational component next year dovetails nicely, as the students will be able to see the physical gardens at that point.

Wintar added there has been a lot of parent buy-in to the idea.

“Kids are the ones who make the difference,” she said. “They’re the ones who go home with the information and parents buy into it.”

Carlisle students plant ideas for natural space

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel to install water-conserving gardens

News Jun 23, 2016 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Next fall, the gardens at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Catholic Elementary School will look a bit different from a standard garden – the beds will be stocked with native, water conserving plants.

The planting project, said OLMC principal Angela Wintar, was instituted in response to the water usage and supply issues plaguing the Carlisle community.

Wintar noted the Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board’s Religion and Family Life program leader Dr. Paul Beaudette originally broached the project to her.

She noted the city had reached out to Beaudette as a result of the water issues.

"Our hope is we can create a demand for these types of plants.”

“They really felt that the way to reach the parents was through educating the kids,” she said. “So would we be willing to be a pilot school for this? I said, ‘For sure.’”

Chris Wilson, the customer service and community outreach project manager for Hamilton Water, said the school initiative is part of the overall conservation program in Carlisle. “We have a lot of people coming in and out of the school, kind of a community centre, and it’s a great opportunity for people to look, touch, feel and smell some of these native plants,” he explained.

Wintar said the project is meant to utilize the school’s garden spaces as demonstration gardens for drought tolerant plants and species, as well as alternatives to grass, such as eco grass or groundcover. The plants will be labeled to explain each species.

The gardens will be planted in the fall because the new plants would be hard to maintain over the summer vacation when no one is at the school. “We’re going to start from scratch in September,” Wintar said.

The gardens on each side of the main entrance to the school will be replanted with a variety of plants that are native to the area. These include grasses and ground covers, as well burning bushes, green pillar pin oak, Canadian Serviceberry, hostas and butterfly bush groupings.

Four smaller garden plots will be replanted as fusion gardens – gardens that only use plants found naturally in southern Ontario. These were designed by students as part of a school-wide contest, with the four winning designs – chosen from 70 submissions – being planted in the fall.

Students were given a list of natural plants and had to draw a rendering of their proposed garden, as well as a rationale for why they chose the plants that they did. The students who submitted the winning designs were Grade 8 student Ashley Zanatta, senior kindergarten student Kaleb Rampersad, Grade 5 pupil Alana King and siblings Dylan and Olivia MacLean, in Grade 2 and 1 respectively.

King noted she was excited about the project. “I like the prairie smoke,” she said of the pink coloured wildflower. “I put it at the back of the garden because it’s the tallest.”

Wintar noted Rob Richarz, the city’s project manager of outreach and education, spoke to the students about water usage at a May assembly and initiated the design contest.

“How much water we use, how much water it takes when you leave the tap running when you’re brushing your teeth – that sort of thing,” she said of the talk. “Then he talked about why we need to save water.”

Each student-deisgned plot will be adorned with a sign in their own writing and their divisions will be responsible for planting and maintaining it.

Wintar noted one of the challenges facing the project is that many of the naturally occurring plants are not available at area garden centres. Andrew Bryl, a Grade 7 teacher at the school, is the school’s eco rep and a member of the Catholic School Council’s Greening Committee. He said the garden will promote the different kinds of plants.

“It will be like a showcase for the community and show parents the possibilities,” he said. “Our hope is we can create a demand for these types of plants.”

Next year, the school plans to include more formal education related to the project, such as water usage and the role of shade trees.

Wintar said including more of an educational component next year dovetails nicely, as the students will be able to see the physical gardens at that point.

Wintar added there has been a lot of parent buy-in to the idea.

“Kids are the ones who make the difference,” she said. “They’re the ones who go home with the information and parents buy into it.”