Braden family heirloom makes its way home to Flamborough

News Feb 28, 2017 by Dianne Cornish, Special to the Review Flamborough Review

The thoughtfulness and perseverance of a P.E.I. couple has resulted in a family heirloom being reunited with the Braden family of Flamborough.

A silver martini shaker dating back to 1939 is now in the Valens home of Dave and Cathy Braden and the story of how it got there is both heartwarming and tinged with a bit of mystery. The 78-year-old family treasure, which bears the initials of Braden’s late father William Greening Braden on its top, as well as an inscription reading "Stag November 28 1939," was bought two years ago at a flea market in Prince Edward Island by Jim and Karyn Noble.

Jim was attracted to the piece because of its large size; he likes making martinis for his friends and guests who visit his bed and breakfast, Noble House, in Malpeque, on the island’s north shore. But Jim was also curious about the initials on the shaker and when the seller at the flea market told him that the it had once belonged to a man named Braden who was a famous Canadian speed boat racer, he was keen on learning more.

Noble did some research and found out more about Bill Braden of Waterdown and his racing history. When family and friends visited, he told them the story about the original owner of the shaker. “The more I thought about it, the more I felt it should belong to the Braden family,” Noble said.

After reading an article about the well-known Canadian boat racer of the 1950s who was featured in the Review seven years ago, he contacted the Review and left his email with editor Brenda Jefferies to pass along to Dave Braden. Not long afterwards, Braden got back to him, expressing great interest in the shaker. He told Noble that he was just 10 years old when his father was killed in a boating mishap in 1958 and anything tangible that could bring back memories of his dad would make him very happy.

Noble carefully packaged up the martini shaker and sent it on its way. After travelling more than 1,700 kilometres, the heirloom arrived home in Flamborough on Dave’s birthday in late January.

Noble refused to take any money for the shaker, so Dave and his older brother Bill sent a copy of John Kelly’s book, The Supertest Story, which relates some of their dad’s racing exploits, to him as a way of expressing their appreciation for his kindness.

“I feel better now that Dave and his family have their lost family treasure back,” Noble said.

“Treasure" is the right word to describe it, Bill and Dave Braden agree. Both are extremely grateful to have received something that belonged to their dad so many years ago. The shaker has been seen and admired by five of William Greening Braden’s six children. (A son in South America hasn’t yet had a chance to see it.)

Bill Jr., who was 18 years old when his dad died, has firmer memories and recalls having seen the shaker during his younger days. He expects it was in his family’s possession up until his dad’s death, leaving the family sometime between 1958 and 1992. How it made its way to eastern Canada and ended up in a flea market in P.E.I. remains a mystery.

Dave recalled that his parents were married in 1940 and that his dad was stationed in Rothesay, New Brunswick while training in the Canadian army during the Second World War. He speculated that his mother Joan, also deceased, might have given the shaker to someone after his dad died.

Bill Jr., a Waterdown resident and owner of Sun ‘n Fun RV Centre at Clappison’s Corners, looks after family memorabilia and plans to “list” the martini shaker as part of the collection. Right now, it is sitting in Dave’s home and being used to hold willow branches. But Dave plans to share it with the family.

“This is a very fine piece,” Dave said of the shaker. The former Flamborough councillor said he’s impressed by the actions of the Nobles and their effort to get the heirloom back to the Braden family, even though they don’t know them. “We lost our dad early and I feel shortchanged by that. There are huge gaps about what kind of person my father was. I love anything that reminds me of him.”

His brother is equally appreciative. “I can’t believe the integrity and commitment,” Bill said of the Nobles.

“There’s a lot of goodwill out there and we sometimes forget that,” Dave said. “This shaker has real special family value.”

The Braden brothers hope anyone with any knowledge about how the shaker made its way to P.E.I. will contact them. But Dave Braden confided, “It might be more fun if there still remains a bit of mystery.”


Braden family heirloom makes its way home to Flamborough

News Feb 28, 2017 by Dianne Cornish, Special to the Review Flamborough Review

The thoughtfulness and perseverance of a P.E.I. couple has resulted in a family heirloom being reunited with the Braden family of Flamborough.

A silver martini shaker dating back to 1939 is now in the Valens home of Dave and Cathy Braden and the story of how it got there is both heartwarming and tinged with a bit of mystery. The 78-year-old family treasure, which bears the initials of Braden’s late father William Greening Braden on its top, as well as an inscription reading "Stag November 28 1939," was bought two years ago at a flea market in Prince Edward Island by Jim and Karyn Noble.

Jim was attracted to the piece because of its large size; he likes making martinis for his friends and guests who visit his bed and breakfast, Noble House, in Malpeque, on the island’s north shore. But Jim was also curious about the initials on the shaker and when the seller at the flea market told him that the it had once belonged to a man named Braden who was a famous Canadian speed boat racer, he was keen on learning more.

Noble did some research and found out more about Bill Braden of Waterdown and his racing history. When family and friends visited, he told them the story about the original owner of the shaker. “The more I thought about it, the more I felt it should belong to the Braden family,” Noble said.

Related Content

After reading an article about the well-known Canadian boat racer of the 1950s who was featured in the Review seven years ago, he contacted the Review and left his email with editor Brenda Jefferies to pass along to Dave Braden. Not long afterwards, Braden got back to him, expressing great interest in the shaker. He told Noble that he was just 10 years old when his father was killed in a boating mishap in 1958 and anything tangible that could bring back memories of his dad would make him very happy.

Noble carefully packaged up the martini shaker and sent it on its way. After travelling more than 1,700 kilometres, the heirloom arrived home in Flamborough on Dave’s birthday in late January.

Noble refused to take any money for the shaker, so Dave and his older brother Bill sent a copy of John Kelly’s book, The Supertest Story, which relates some of their dad’s racing exploits, to him as a way of expressing their appreciation for his kindness.

“I feel better now that Dave and his family have their lost family treasure back,” Noble said.

“Treasure" is the right word to describe it, Bill and Dave Braden agree. Both are extremely grateful to have received something that belonged to their dad so many years ago. The shaker has been seen and admired by five of William Greening Braden’s six children. (A son in South America hasn’t yet had a chance to see it.)

Bill Jr., who was 18 years old when his dad died, has firmer memories and recalls having seen the shaker during his younger days. He expects it was in his family’s possession up until his dad’s death, leaving the family sometime between 1958 and 1992. How it made its way to eastern Canada and ended up in a flea market in P.E.I. remains a mystery.

Dave recalled that his parents were married in 1940 and that his dad was stationed in Rothesay, New Brunswick while training in the Canadian army during the Second World War. He speculated that his mother Joan, also deceased, might have given the shaker to someone after his dad died.

Bill Jr., a Waterdown resident and owner of Sun ‘n Fun RV Centre at Clappison’s Corners, looks after family memorabilia and plans to “list” the martini shaker as part of the collection. Right now, it is sitting in Dave’s home and being used to hold willow branches. But Dave plans to share it with the family.

“This is a very fine piece,” Dave said of the shaker. The former Flamborough councillor said he’s impressed by the actions of the Nobles and their effort to get the heirloom back to the Braden family, even though they don’t know them. “We lost our dad early and I feel shortchanged by that. There are huge gaps about what kind of person my father was. I love anything that reminds me of him.”

His brother is equally appreciative. “I can’t believe the integrity and commitment,” Bill said of the Nobles.

“There’s a lot of goodwill out there and we sometimes forget that,” Dave said. “This shaker has real special family value.”

The Braden brothers hope anyone with any knowledge about how the shaker made its way to P.E.I. will contact them. But Dave Braden confided, “It might be more fun if there still remains a bit of mystery.”


Braden family heirloom makes its way home to Flamborough

News Feb 28, 2017 by Dianne Cornish, Special to the Review Flamborough Review

The thoughtfulness and perseverance of a P.E.I. couple has resulted in a family heirloom being reunited with the Braden family of Flamborough.

A silver martini shaker dating back to 1939 is now in the Valens home of Dave and Cathy Braden and the story of how it got there is both heartwarming and tinged with a bit of mystery. The 78-year-old family treasure, which bears the initials of Braden’s late father William Greening Braden on its top, as well as an inscription reading "Stag November 28 1939," was bought two years ago at a flea market in Prince Edward Island by Jim and Karyn Noble.

Jim was attracted to the piece because of its large size; he likes making martinis for his friends and guests who visit his bed and breakfast, Noble House, in Malpeque, on the island’s north shore. But Jim was also curious about the initials on the shaker and when the seller at the flea market told him that the it had once belonged to a man named Braden who was a famous Canadian speed boat racer, he was keen on learning more.

Noble did some research and found out more about Bill Braden of Waterdown and his racing history. When family and friends visited, he told them the story about the original owner of the shaker. “The more I thought about it, the more I felt it should belong to the Braden family,” Noble said.

Related Content

After reading an article about the well-known Canadian boat racer of the 1950s who was featured in the Review seven years ago, he contacted the Review and left his email with editor Brenda Jefferies to pass along to Dave Braden. Not long afterwards, Braden got back to him, expressing great interest in the shaker. He told Noble that he was just 10 years old when his father was killed in a boating mishap in 1958 and anything tangible that could bring back memories of his dad would make him very happy.

Noble carefully packaged up the martini shaker and sent it on its way. After travelling more than 1,700 kilometres, the heirloom arrived home in Flamborough on Dave’s birthday in late January.

Noble refused to take any money for the shaker, so Dave and his older brother Bill sent a copy of John Kelly’s book, The Supertest Story, which relates some of their dad’s racing exploits, to him as a way of expressing their appreciation for his kindness.

“I feel better now that Dave and his family have their lost family treasure back,” Noble said.

“Treasure" is the right word to describe it, Bill and Dave Braden agree. Both are extremely grateful to have received something that belonged to their dad so many years ago. The shaker has been seen and admired by five of William Greening Braden’s six children. (A son in South America hasn’t yet had a chance to see it.)

Bill Jr., who was 18 years old when his dad died, has firmer memories and recalls having seen the shaker during his younger days. He expects it was in his family’s possession up until his dad’s death, leaving the family sometime between 1958 and 1992. How it made its way to eastern Canada and ended up in a flea market in P.E.I. remains a mystery.

Dave recalled that his parents were married in 1940 and that his dad was stationed in Rothesay, New Brunswick while training in the Canadian army during the Second World War. He speculated that his mother Joan, also deceased, might have given the shaker to someone after his dad died.

Bill Jr., a Waterdown resident and owner of Sun ‘n Fun RV Centre at Clappison’s Corners, looks after family memorabilia and plans to “list” the martini shaker as part of the collection. Right now, it is sitting in Dave’s home and being used to hold willow branches. But Dave plans to share it with the family.

“This is a very fine piece,” Dave said of the shaker. The former Flamborough councillor said he’s impressed by the actions of the Nobles and their effort to get the heirloom back to the Braden family, even though they don’t know them. “We lost our dad early and I feel shortchanged by that. There are huge gaps about what kind of person my father was. I love anything that reminds me of him.”

His brother is equally appreciative. “I can’t believe the integrity and commitment,” Bill said of the Nobles.

“There’s a lot of goodwill out there and we sometimes forget that,” Dave said. “This shaker has real special family value.”

The Braden brothers hope anyone with any knowledge about how the shaker made its way to P.E.I. will contact them. But Dave Braden confided, “It might be more fun if there still remains a bit of mystery.”