Hamilton council briefs: street hockey scores; free lunches, statue for a poet

News Mar 10, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton youths will be able to play road hockey on city streets starting this year.

City council approved a bylaw on March 8 that will make street hockey legal after 60 years. The city banned street hockey because of liability issues. The city had only one claim in 2002 when a father and son took a ticket issued to them for playing street hockey to court. The judge dismissed the issue.

The bylaw restricts street hockey to roads that have a speed limit of 40 km/h or less and between 9 a.m. and 8 p.m.

However, Stoney Creek councillors Brenda Johnson, Maria Pearson and Doug Conley all opposed the measure. Conley said the former city of Stoney Creek allowed street hockey prior to amalgamation. He called it “the worst mistake” the city made.

He said a lot of the complaints he fielded at the time were because of noise and damage by youths as they hit vehicles and houses with balls.

“I spent a quarter of my time visiting people who had complaints,” said Conley.

Pearson and Johnson raised safety concerns for youths who would be playing on Hamilton’s roads. They said traffic has become more intense and youths could be more at risk.

Ward 1 Coun. Aidan Johnson said residents in his neighbourhoods had an issue with noise, but he supported the bylaw anyway.

He said it was a healthy, free activity that allowed low-income youths to participate and forced all youths to drop their cellphones and computers and get outside.

Ward 2 Coun. Jason Farr and his 11-year-old son ignored the prohibition and played road hockey in front of their home. His son developed “the most tenacious wrist shot” on the street, said Farr.

 

Turf field for Sir Winston Churchill

Hamilton politicians agreed to spend $75,000 to install an artificial turf field for Sir. Winston Churchill Secondary School. The new field will be used by Churchill and the new North Secondary School.

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board approved the project and expects to start the installation in April. The city will be partnering with the board on the project.

Ward 4 Coun. Sam Merulla, who represents the area where the school is located, says the contribution, from the Ward 4 capital reserve, also helps to celebrate Sir Winston Churchill School’s 50th birthday.

 

New statue at LiUNA

Hamilton politicians agreed to contribute $15,000 toward a new statue of Leonardo Sciascia, an award-winning writer of fiction, poetry and political commentary at LiUNA Station in the Immigration Square Parkette.

Sciascia was a famous son of Racalmuto, Sicily, where a bronze statute is installed on the Via Garibaldi, the main street of his hometown. Hamilton is the twin city of Racalmuto.

Sciascia, who died in 1989, served in the European Parliament from 1975 to 1977 for the Italian Communist Party and the Radical Party from 1979 to 1984.

A local committee, which wanted to recognize the importance of Sicilian immigrants to the growth of Hamilton, wanted to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the twinning of Racalmuto to Hamilton, along with the 150th anniversary of Canada. The committee is seeking to raise $50,000 for the statue.

 

Free lunch

Mountain Coun. Donna Skelly questioned the need to provide free lunches for councillors, staff and volunteers during committee meetings.

The city has provided beverages, cookies, pizza and sandwiches during long committee meetings that sometimes go for 12 hours.

Mike Zegarac, corporate services general manager, says a review of the policy in 2011 revealed that under the Employment Standards Act, the city is required to provide a 30-minute lunch period after five hours of work to employees.

It was determined that providing lunch would be more efficient than stopping the meeting to allow for the break, he said. He said moving the council meetings to 5 p.m. from 7 p.m. eliminated the need to provide a food during a long council meeting.

“It’s an effort to avoid an interruption and having to have staff disperse,” said Zegarac.

Glanbrook Coun. Brenda Johnson said in 2011 staff told her providing lunch would also prevent paying overtime costs to employees who are required to be at the standing committees. She said the overtime expenses would be astronomical if there were no food breaks.

Skelly said the issue was prompted by a letter to the editor in the Hamilton Spectator that suggested a $30,000 grant being considered to the Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction could be taken from the lunch expenses.

“We are talking about trying to save money,” said Skelly. “And I certainly don’t want to be accused of taking advantage of this.”

Johnson agreed the issue can be “looked at again. I have no problem.”

There was no motion by councillors to further investigate the city’s lunch expenses.

 

 

Hamilton council briefs: street hockey scores; free lunches, statue for a poet

News Mar 10, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton youths will be able to play road hockey on city streets starting this year.

City council approved a bylaw on March 8 that will make street hockey legal after 60 years. The city banned street hockey because of liability issues. The city had only one claim in 2002 when a father and son took a ticket issued to them for playing street hockey to court. The judge dismissed the issue.

The bylaw restricts street hockey to roads that have a speed limit of 40 km/h or less and between 9 a.m. and 8 p.m.

However, Stoney Creek councillors Brenda Johnson, Maria Pearson and Doug Conley all opposed the measure. Conley said the former city of Stoney Creek allowed street hockey prior to amalgamation. He called it “the worst mistake” the city made.

He said a lot of the complaints he fielded at the time were because of noise and damage by youths as they hit vehicles and houses with balls.

“I spent a quarter of my time visiting people who had complaints,” said Conley.

Pearson and Johnson raised safety concerns for youths who would be playing on Hamilton’s roads. They said traffic has become more intense and youths could be more at risk.

Ward 1 Coun. Aidan Johnson said residents in his neighbourhoods had an issue with noise, but he supported the bylaw anyway.

He said it was a healthy, free activity that allowed low-income youths to participate and forced all youths to drop their cellphones and computers and get outside.

Ward 2 Coun. Jason Farr and his 11-year-old son ignored the prohibition and played road hockey in front of their home. His son developed “the most tenacious wrist shot” on the street, said Farr.

 

Turf field for Sir Winston Churchill

Hamilton politicians agreed to spend $75,000 to install an artificial turf field for Sir. Winston Churchill Secondary School. The new field will be used by Churchill and the new North Secondary School.

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board approved the project and expects to start the installation in April. The city will be partnering with the board on the project.

Ward 4 Coun. Sam Merulla, who represents the area where the school is located, says the contribution, from the Ward 4 capital reserve, also helps to celebrate Sir Winston Churchill School’s 50th birthday.

 

New statue at LiUNA

Hamilton politicians agreed to contribute $15,000 toward a new statue of Leonardo Sciascia, an award-winning writer of fiction, poetry and political commentary at LiUNA Station in the Immigration Square Parkette.

Sciascia was a famous son of Racalmuto, Sicily, where a bronze statute is installed on the Via Garibaldi, the main street of his hometown. Hamilton is the twin city of Racalmuto.

Sciascia, who died in 1989, served in the European Parliament from 1975 to 1977 for the Italian Communist Party and the Radical Party from 1979 to 1984.

A local committee, which wanted to recognize the importance of Sicilian immigrants to the growth of Hamilton, wanted to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the twinning of Racalmuto to Hamilton, along with the 150th anniversary of Canada. The committee is seeking to raise $50,000 for the statue.

 

Free lunch

Mountain Coun. Donna Skelly questioned the need to provide free lunches for councillors, staff and volunteers during committee meetings.

The city has provided beverages, cookies, pizza and sandwiches during long committee meetings that sometimes go for 12 hours.

Mike Zegarac, corporate services general manager, says a review of the policy in 2011 revealed that under the Employment Standards Act, the city is required to provide a 30-minute lunch period after five hours of work to employees.

It was determined that providing lunch would be more efficient than stopping the meeting to allow for the break, he said. He said moving the council meetings to 5 p.m. from 7 p.m. eliminated the need to provide a food during a long council meeting.

“It’s an effort to avoid an interruption and having to have staff disperse,” said Zegarac.

Glanbrook Coun. Brenda Johnson said in 2011 staff told her providing lunch would also prevent paying overtime costs to employees who are required to be at the standing committees. She said the overtime expenses would be astronomical if there were no food breaks.

Skelly said the issue was prompted by a letter to the editor in the Hamilton Spectator that suggested a $30,000 grant being considered to the Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction could be taken from the lunch expenses.

“We are talking about trying to save money,” said Skelly. “And I certainly don’t want to be accused of taking advantage of this.”

Johnson agreed the issue can be “looked at again. I have no problem.”

There was no motion by councillors to further investigate the city’s lunch expenses.

 

 

Hamilton council briefs: street hockey scores; free lunches, statue for a poet

News Mar 10, 2017 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton youths will be able to play road hockey on city streets starting this year.

City council approved a bylaw on March 8 that will make street hockey legal after 60 years. The city banned street hockey because of liability issues. The city had only one claim in 2002 when a father and son took a ticket issued to them for playing street hockey to court. The judge dismissed the issue.

The bylaw restricts street hockey to roads that have a speed limit of 40 km/h or less and between 9 a.m. and 8 p.m.

However, Stoney Creek councillors Brenda Johnson, Maria Pearson and Doug Conley all opposed the measure. Conley said the former city of Stoney Creek allowed street hockey prior to amalgamation. He called it “the worst mistake” the city made.

He said a lot of the complaints he fielded at the time were because of noise and damage by youths as they hit vehicles and houses with balls.

“I spent a quarter of my time visiting people who had complaints,” said Conley.

Pearson and Johnson raised safety concerns for youths who would be playing on Hamilton’s roads. They said traffic has become more intense and youths could be more at risk.

Ward 1 Coun. Aidan Johnson said residents in his neighbourhoods had an issue with noise, but he supported the bylaw anyway.

He said it was a healthy, free activity that allowed low-income youths to participate and forced all youths to drop their cellphones and computers and get outside.

Ward 2 Coun. Jason Farr and his 11-year-old son ignored the prohibition and played road hockey in front of their home. His son developed “the most tenacious wrist shot” on the street, said Farr.

 

Turf field for Sir Winston Churchill

Hamilton politicians agreed to spend $75,000 to install an artificial turf field for Sir. Winston Churchill Secondary School. The new field will be used by Churchill and the new North Secondary School.

The Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board approved the project and expects to start the installation in April. The city will be partnering with the board on the project.

Ward 4 Coun. Sam Merulla, who represents the area where the school is located, says the contribution, from the Ward 4 capital reserve, also helps to celebrate Sir Winston Churchill School’s 50th birthday.

 

New statue at LiUNA

Hamilton politicians agreed to contribute $15,000 toward a new statue of Leonardo Sciascia, an award-winning writer of fiction, poetry and political commentary at LiUNA Station in the Immigration Square Parkette.

Sciascia was a famous son of Racalmuto, Sicily, where a bronze statute is installed on the Via Garibaldi, the main street of his hometown. Hamilton is the twin city of Racalmuto.

Sciascia, who died in 1989, served in the European Parliament from 1975 to 1977 for the Italian Communist Party and the Radical Party from 1979 to 1984.

A local committee, which wanted to recognize the importance of Sicilian immigrants to the growth of Hamilton, wanted to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the twinning of Racalmuto to Hamilton, along with the 150th anniversary of Canada. The committee is seeking to raise $50,000 for the statue.

 

Free lunch

Mountain Coun. Donna Skelly questioned the need to provide free lunches for councillors, staff and volunteers during committee meetings.

The city has provided beverages, cookies, pizza and sandwiches during long committee meetings that sometimes go for 12 hours.

Mike Zegarac, corporate services general manager, says a review of the policy in 2011 revealed that under the Employment Standards Act, the city is required to provide a 30-minute lunch period after five hours of work to employees.

It was determined that providing lunch would be more efficient than stopping the meeting to allow for the break, he said. He said moving the council meetings to 5 p.m. from 7 p.m. eliminated the need to provide a food during a long council meeting.

“It’s an effort to avoid an interruption and having to have staff disperse,” said Zegarac.

Glanbrook Coun. Brenda Johnson said in 2011 staff told her providing lunch would also prevent paying overtime costs to employees who are required to be at the standing committees. She said the overtime expenses would be astronomical if there were no food breaks.

Skelly said the issue was prompted by a letter to the editor in the Hamilton Spectator that suggested a $30,000 grant being considered to the Hamilton Roundtable for Poverty Reduction could be taken from the lunch expenses.

“We are talking about trying to save money,” said Skelly. “And I certainly don’t want to be accused of taking advantage of this.”

Johnson agreed the issue can be “looked at again. I have no problem.”

There was no motion by councillors to further investigate the city’s lunch expenses.