Backup well proposed for Greensville residential neighbourhood

News Jul 17, 2017 by Dianne Cornish, Special to the Review Flamborough Review

A new municipal backup well proposed for a small residential neighbourhood west of Greensville Public School was welcomed last Tuesday by a handful of residents attending an information meeting at Christ Church.

Hosted by the City of Hamilton as part of the environmental assessment (EA) required for the project, the Public Information Centre (PIC) drew about a dozen residents from the Forest Avenue area directly affected by the proposal. Most wanted to get an idea of the time frame for the project, where the new well will be located and if there will be any effect on their monthly water bills once the new well is in place.

Project manager Marco Silverio of Hamilton’s public works department and consulting engineer Andre Poirier of Amec Foster Wheeler in Burlington were on hand to discuss information on display boards set up in the church for the presentation and to answer residents’ questions.

Silverio explained installation of a municipal backup well to service the 36 homes in the Greensville neighbourhood is a recommendation from a subwatershed study completed last year. The homes are currently serviced by a well just east of Forest Avenue near Harvest Road. The well is 45 years old and is powered by a pump station built 41 years ago.

While Silverio pointed out there are no issues with the current well, it has no reservoir or storage capacity, which means that residents served by it are without water when the system needs maintenance work. A backup well would address that eventuality.

Three test wells were dug in 2013 to determine the best location for a backup well. The one with the highest yield is in the Johnson Tew Park just south of the end of Cedar Avenue.

The EA study process consists of four phases, with two already completed. The process includes public and review agency consultation, presentation and evaluation of alternative design concepts of the backup well, selection of a preferred design concept and documentation of the evaluation of alternatives. When the study is completed, most likely sometime next year, an environmental study report will be prepared and made available for public review.

Homeowner Deb Dorpmans, who has lived on Forest Avenue for 15 years, asked whether there would be any impact on the well-water supply when the new Greensville school opens in September 2018. Silverio said tests, taking into account the increased student population, show there will be no detrimental effect on groundwater supply as the school has a well that will satisfy students’ needs.

Asked about the timing of the municipal backup well, Silverio said it could take two years to complete. He told the Review last Thursday that the construction is expected to begin in 2020, with the well becoming operational in 2021. A pump house will be needed to operate the well and a road from Cedar Avenue will be built to access it.

Providing residents maintain their usual water consumption, there should be no increase in their water bill other than city-approved water rate hikes, Silverio told residents.

Poirier said the new well will be “superior and easier to operate” than the current one. It will not contain any organics, making it easier to treat before consumption, he noted.

Another PIC will be held in Greensville in September or October to present and gather input on conceptual designs for the backup well.

Details about the information made available to residents attending last week’s PIC are available on the city’s website at www.hamilton.ca/greensvillebackupwell. Residents can print off a comment sheet from the site to provide their input or can email Silverio directly at Marco.Silverio@hamilton.ca. The comment deadline is Aug. 1.


Backup well proposed for Greensville residential neighbourhood

News Jul 17, 2017 by Dianne Cornish, Special to the Review Flamborough Review

A new municipal backup well proposed for a small residential neighbourhood west of Greensville Public School was welcomed last Tuesday by a handful of residents attending an information meeting at Christ Church.

Hosted by the City of Hamilton as part of the environmental assessment (EA) required for the project, the Public Information Centre (PIC) drew about a dozen residents from the Forest Avenue area directly affected by the proposal. Most wanted to get an idea of the time frame for the project, where the new well will be located and if there will be any effect on their monthly water bills once the new well is in place.

Project manager Marco Silverio of Hamilton’s public works department and consulting engineer Andre Poirier of Amec Foster Wheeler in Burlington were on hand to discuss information on display boards set up in the church for the presentation and to answer residents’ questions.

Silverio explained installation of a municipal backup well to service the 36 homes in the Greensville neighbourhood is a recommendation from a subwatershed study completed last year. The homes are currently serviced by a well just east of Forest Avenue near Harvest Road. The well is 45 years old and is powered by a pump station built 41 years ago.

While Silverio pointed out there are no issues with the current well, it has no reservoir or storage capacity, which means that residents served by it are without water when the system needs maintenance work. A backup well would address that eventuality.

Three test wells were dug in 2013 to determine the best location for a backup well. The one with the highest yield is in the Johnson Tew Park just south of the end of Cedar Avenue.

The EA study process consists of four phases, with two already completed. The process includes public and review agency consultation, presentation and evaluation of alternative design concepts of the backup well, selection of a preferred design concept and documentation of the evaluation of alternatives. When the study is completed, most likely sometime next year, an environmental study report will be prepared and made available for public review.

Homeowner Deb Dorpmans, who has lived on Forest Avenue for 15 years, asked whether there would be any impact on the well-water supply when the new Greensville school opens in September 2018. Silverio said tests, taking into account the increased student population, show there will be no detrimental effect on groundwater supply as the school has a well that will satisfy students’ needs.

Asked about the timing of the municipal backup well, Silverio said it could take two years to complete. He told the Review last Thursday that the construction is expected to begin in 2020, with the well becoming operational in 2021. A pump house will be needed to operate the well and a road from Cedar Avenue will be built to access it.

Providing residents maintain their usual water consumption, there should be no increase in their water bill other than city-approved water rate hikes, Silverio told residents.

Poirier said the new well will be “superior and easier to operate” than the current one. It will not contain any organics, making it easier to treat before consumption, he noted.

Another PIC will be held in Greensville in September or October to present and gather input on conceptual designs for the backup well.

Details about the information made available to residents attending last week’s PIC are available on the city’s website at www.hamilton.ca/greensvillebackupwell. Residents can print off a comment sheet from the site to provide their input or can email Silverio directly at Marco.Silverio@hamilton.ca. The comment deadline is Aug. 1.


Backup well proposed for Greensville residential neighbourhood

News Jul 17, 2017 by Dianne Cornish, Special to the Review Flamborough Review

A new municipal backup well proposed for a small residential neighbourhood west of Greensville Public School was welcomed last Tuesday by a handful of residents attending an information meeting at Christ Church.

Hosted by the City of Hamilton as part of the environmental assessment (EA) required for the project, the Public Information Centre (PIC) drew about a dozen residents from the Forest Avenue area directly affected by the proposal. Most wanted to get an idea of the time frame for the project, where the new well will be located and if there will be any effect on their monthly water bills once the new well is in place.

Project manager Marco Silverio of Hamilton’s public works department and consulting engineer Andre Poirier of Amec Foster Wheeler in Burlington were on hand to discuss information on display boards set up in the church for the presentation and to answer residents’ questions.

Silverio explained installation of a municipal backup well to service the 36 homes in the Greensville neighbourhood is a recommendation from a subwatershed study completed last year. The homes are currently serviced by a well just east of Forest Avenue near Harvest Road. The well is 45 years old and is powered by a pump station built 41 years ago.

While Silverio pointed out there are no issues with the current well, it has no reservoir or storage capacity, which means that residents served by it are without water when the system needs maintenance work. A backup well would address that eventuality.

Three test wells were dug in 2013 to determine the best location for a backup well. The one with the highest yield is in the Johnson Tew Park just south of the end of Cedar Avenue.

The EA study process consists of four phases, with two already completed. The process includes public and review agency consultation, presentation and evaluation of alternative design concepts of the backup well, selection of a preferred design concept and documentation of the evaluation of alternatives. When the study is completed, most likely sometime next year, an environmental study report will be prepared and made available for public review.

Homeowner Deb Dorpmans, who has lived on Forest Avenue for 15 years, asked whether there would be any impact on the well-water supply when the new Greensville school opens in September 2018. Silverio said tests, taking into account the increased student population, show there will be no detrimental effect on groundwater supply as the school has a well that will satisfy students’ needs.

Asked about the timing of the municipal backup well, Silverio said it could take two years to complete. He told the Review last Thursday that the construction is expected to begin in 2020, with the well becoming operational in 2021. A pump house will be needed to operate the well and a road from Cedar Avenue will be built to access it.

Providing residents maintain their usual water consumption, there should be no increase in their water bill other than city-approved water rate hikes, Silverio told residents.

Poirier said the new well will be “superior and easier to operate” than the current one. It will not contain any organics, making it easier to treat before consumption, he noted.

Another PIC will be held in Greensville in September or October to present and gather input on conceptual designs for the backup well.

Details about the information made available to residents attending last week’s PIC are available on the city’s website at www.hamilton.ca/greensvillebackupwell. Residents can print off a comment sheet from the site to provide their input or can email Silverio directly at Marco.Silverio@hamilton.ca. The comment deadline is Aug. 1.