$1.7 million interior restoration at Hamilton’s St. Mark’s church begins

News Feb 22, 2019 by Mark McNeil The Hamilton Spectator

After 25 years of City of Hamilton ownership, historic St. Mark's Church on Bay Street South is entering a final phase of its restoration work with plans to open the facility as a community meeting place in early 2021.

On Friday, senior project manager Carolyn Samko gave local media a tour of the 142-year-old church at the corner of Bay and Hunter.

She said a $1.8-million first phase involved preliminary site work with new service hookups as well as masonry, foundation, and weeping tile repairs. The roof was replaced on the tower section of the structure, windows were restored and a new heating and ventilation system added.

The $1.7-million second phase will concentrate on interior restoration of the historic part of the church, she said. As well, an addition on the west side will be built to house washrooms, a kitchenette and storage. The site will be made wheelchair accessible and the park beside the building will be improved.

Samko said the building and park are an important part of the Durand Neighbourhood that is lacking in green and meeting space.

Janice Brown, of the Durand Neighbourhood Association, said the association is pleased with the work so far.

"I am delighted. I can hardly wait."

St. Mark's Anglican Church

Location: Bay and Hunter streets

Built: 1877; Sunday school added in 1925

Closed: 1989

City owned: Since 1994

Notable attributes: The landscaped front grounds create a park-like setting and are a green-space contrast to the highrise buildings in the neighbourhood.

Historical: St. Mark's was the fifth Anglican Church built in Hamilton and the first constructed in brick.

Architectural features: The building was designed in the Gothic Revival tradition with a gabled roof, buttresses, belfry and pointed arched windows. There's a bell tower with strong architectural features on the east side.

mmcneil@thespec.com

905-526-4687 | @Markatthespec

mmcneil@thespec.com

905-526-4687 | @Markatthespec

$1.7 million interior restoration at Hamilton’s St. Mark’s church begins

The 142 year-old city-owned church on Bay Street South expected to reopen in 2021 as a community meeting place

News Feb 22, 2019 by Mark McNeil The Hamilton Spectator

After 25 years of City of Hamilton ownership, historic St. Mark's Church on Bay Street South is entering a final phase of its restoration work with plans to open the facility as a community meeting place in early 2021.

On Friday, senior project manager Carolyn Samko gave local media a tour of the 142-year-old church at the corner of Bay and Hunter.

She said a $1.8-million first phase involved preliminary site work with new service hookups as well as masonry, foundation, and weeping tile repairs. The roof was replaced on the tower section of the structure, windows were restored and a new heating and ventilation system added.

The $1.7-million second phase will concentrate on interior restoration of the historic part of the church, she said. As well, an addition on the west side will be built to house washrooms, a kitchenette and storage. The site will be made wheelchair accessible and the park beside the building will be improved.

Samko said the building and park are an important part of the Durand Neighbourhood that is lacking in green and meeting space.

Janice Brown, of the Durand Neighbourhood Association, said the association is pleased with the work so far.

"I am delighted. I can hardly wait."

St. Mark's Anglican Church

Location: Bay and Hunter streets

Built: 1877; Sunday school added in 1925

Closed: 1989

City owned: Since 1994

Notable attributes: The landscaped front grounds create a park-like setting and are a green-space contrast to the highrise buildings in the neighbourhood.

Historical: St. Mark's was the fifth Anglican Church built in Hamilton and the first constructed in brick.

Architectural features: The building was designed in the Gothic Revival tradition with a gabled roof, buttresses, belfry and pointed arched windows. There's a bell tower with strong architectural features on the east side.

mmcneil@thespec.com

905-526-4687 | @Markatthespec

mmcneil@thespec.com

905-526-4687 | @Markatthespec

$1.7 million interior restoration at Hamilton’s St. Mark’s church begins

The 142 year-old city-owned church on Bay Street South expected to reopen in 2021 as a community meeting place

News Feb 22, 2019 by Mark McNeil The Hamilton Spectator

After 25 years of City of Hamilton ownership, historic St. Mark's Church on Bay Street South is entering a final phase of its restoration work with plans to open the facility as a community meeting place in early 2021.

On Friday, senior project manager Carolyn Samko gave local media a tour of the 142-year-old church at the corner of Bay and Hunter.

She said a $1.8-million first phase involved preliminary site work with new service hookups as well as masonry, foundation, and weeping tile repairs. The roof was replaced on the tower section of the structure, windows were restored and a new heating and ventilation system added.

The $1.7-million second phase will concentrate on interior restoration of the historic part of the church, she said. As well, an addition on the west side will be built to house washrooms, a kitchenette and storage. The site will be made wheelchair accessible and the park beside the building will be improved.

Samko said the building and park are an important part of the Durand Neighbourhood that is lacking in green and meeting space.

Janice Brown, of the Durand Neighbourhood Association, said the association is pleased with the work so far.

"I am delighted. I can hardly wait."

St. Mark's Anglican Church

Location: Bay and Hunter streets

Built: 1877; Sunday school added in 1925

Closed: 1989

City owned: Since 1994

Notable attributes: The landscaped front grounds create a park-like setting and are a green-space contrast to the highrise buildings in the neighbourhood.

Historical: St. Mark's was the fifth Anglican Church built in Hamilton and the first constructed in brick.

Architectural features: The building was designed in the Gothic Revival tradition with a gabled roof, buttresses, belfry and pointed arched windows. There's a bell tower with strong architectural features on the east side.

mmcneil@thespec.com

905-526-4687 | @Markatthespec

mmcneil@thespec.com

905-526-4687 | @Markatthespec