ONTARIO COLD CASE: Young mom's disappearance reported nine years later

News Jun 13, 2019 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

In February 2015, Nuseiba Hasan was reported missing to Hamilton police.

The twist? She hadn’t been seen since 2006.

She was last seen alive when a family member dropped her off at the family’s residence, at 1207 8th Concession West in Flamborough, at night, in the fall of 2006.

The next day, she was gone. But she wasn’t reported missing for nine years.

Investigators suspect foul play and believe she may have been murdered.

Hamilton police Det.-Sgt. Peter Thom said in 2016 that police don’t know why it took nine years for her family to report Hasan missing.

“It’s obviously something we find a bit odd,” Thom said at the time.

Hasan was described as approximately five-foot-four tall, with a slim build, and of Jordanian descent, with brown eyes and black hair.

NUSEIBA HASAN

Nuseiba Hasan was reported missing by a family member in February 2015. She was last seen alive in 2006.

The case came to light in October 2016 when the Hamilton Police Homicide Unit conducted a massive ground search of the 55-acre 8th Concession West property where Hasan was last seen. The search operation involved cadaver dogs, drones, ground-penetrating radar and a backhoe, as well as a forensic anthropologist and the mounted unit.

PROPERTYSEARCH2

Police on horseback scoured a 55-acre Flamborough property where they say Nuseiba Hasan was last seen alive in 2006. The search took place in 2016; Hasan was reported missing by a family member in February 2015. Torstar file photo

Thom said police spent the time since Hasan was reported missing in February 2015, and the ground search, trying to determine if she was, in fact, missing. Hasan was known to travel to Jordan and elsewhere in the Middle East, and the investigation attempted to determine if her driver’s licence, passport or health card had been used.

“There’s been nothing,” Thom said. “It’s like she just dropped off the face of the earth in 2006, the beginning of 2007.”

When she was last seen, Hasan was in and out of school, and the last place police know she was studying was Fanshawe College in London.

One factor complicating the investigation, Thom said in 2016, is that police aren’t certain who lived at the Flamborough property when Hasan was dropped off. The family owned a number of properties, both in Canada and overseas, and it is a bit vague as to which family members lived at the Flamborough farm.

“They have a number of properties, and were back and forward between Jordan and Canada,” he said in 2016. “Talking to the family members, no one can really put a timeline on that, per se.”

And while it is believed that the property was purchased by Hasan’s parents in 2006, it is unclear if they lived at the site — or just farmed the property.

Another difficulty is that it has been challenging for police to make contact with family members. Some still live in southern Ontario, and others are in the Middle East.

For those they have been able to contact, the level of co-operation has varied.

“There’s been some members of the family who have been extremely co-operative, others not so much,” Thom said.

While little is known of Hasan’s childhood, a Facebook page attributed to her lists Robert Baldwin and Sam Sherratt public schools in Milton under Education. At some point, the page was renamed "Locate Nuseiba," but posts go back only to October 2015.

One of the few confirmed facts about her childhood is that when she was 14 she was taken into the care of the Halton Children’s Aid Society and placed in a foster home for about two months.

In the aftermath, her father, Moses Hasan, erected signs on the family’s property near Milton protesting the involvement of the CAS. He also told the Milton Canadian Champion in 1995 that the CAS was bullying his family.

Moses died in 2012, and as of 2016, Nuseiba's mother lived in Jordan. Other family members — including her seven or eight siblings, are scattered.

Moses once owned a company called Bethlehem and Sons Excavating — something which led police to consider the possibility of evidence buried at the Flamborough property.

Another twist to the tale is that Nuseiba Hasan, who was 26 when she went missing, gave birth to a daughter when was about 18. The child was adopted before Hasan disappeared, and Thom said in 2016 police were aware of the child’s location.

This month, Thom said cases such as Hasan’s disappearance are very difficult to investigate. This particular case was made more difficult because investigators were forced to move quickly due to a pending demolition on the farm site.

The property was sold in March 2016, and the new owner took possession of the property in October. With plans to demolish the house on the property and rebuild, investigators were forced to jump into action.

“We had to reassess the information and move faster than we would have liked, due to the farmhouse being demolished, which would have resulted in a potential loss of evidence,” he said. “By doing so, it tipped our hand that an investigation had been initiated.”

PROPERTYSEARCH2

Police search the Flamborough property where Nuseiba Hasan was last seen. Torstar file photo

However, Thom said that since the search of the farm there has been little new information about Hasan’s disappearance — something he attributes to the locations of many of those involved with the case.

“Given the nuances of this case (such as) the delay in Nuseiba being reported missing, the familial dynamic, language and cultural difference, as well as the geographical considerations, this investigation is certainly very challenging,” he said.

As the family owned a number of different properties, Thom added, other potential areas have and are being considered.

However, he stressed the case is still an open investigation.

“We have to remember that there is a missing person, Nuseiba Hasan, who is believed to have been killed,” he said, "and that she has a daughter who wants to know what happened to her mom.”

Anyone with information about Hasan's disappearance can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or submit an anonymous tip online at www.crimestoppershamilton.com.

– With files from the Hamilton Spectator

ONTARIO COLD CASE: Young mom's disappearance reported nine years later

“It’s like she just dropped off the face of the earth in 2006, the beginning of 2007”

News Jun 13, 2019 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

In February 2015, Nuseiba Hasan was reported missing to Hamilton police.

The twist? She hadn’t been seen since 2006.

She was last seen alive when a family member dropped her off at the family’s residence, at 1207 8th Concession West in Flamborough, at night, in the fall of 2006.

The next day, she was gone. But she wasn’t reported missing for nine years.

Related Content

Investigators suspect foul play and believe she may have been murdered.

Hamilton police Det.-Sgt. Peter Thom said in 2016 that police don’t know why it took nine years for her family to report Hasan missing.

“It’s obviously something we find a bit odd,” Thom said at the time.

Hasan was described as approximately five-foot-four tall, with a slim build, and of Jordanian descent, with brown eyes and black hair.

NUSEIBA HASAN

Nuseiba Hasan was reported missing by a family member in February 2015. She was last seen alive in 2006.

The case came to light in October 2016 when the Hamilton Police Homicide Unit conducted a massive ground search of the 55-acre 8th Concession West property where Hasan was last seen. The search operation involved cadaver dogs, drones, ground-penetrating radar and a backhoe, as well as a forensic anthropologist and the mounted unit.

PROPERTYSEARCH2

Police on horseback scoured a 55-acre Flamborough property where they say Nuseiba Hasan was last seen alive in 2006. The search took place in 2016; Hasan was reported missing by a family member in February 2015. Torstar file photo

Thom said police spent the time since Hasan was reported missing in February 2015, and the ground search, trying to determine if she was, in fact, missing. Hasan was known to travel to Jordan and elsewhere in the Middle East, and the investigation attempted to determine if her driver’s licence, passport or health card had been used.

“There’s been nothing,” Thom said. “It’s like she just dropped off the face of the earth in 2006, the beginning of 2007.”

When she was last seen, Hasan was in and out of school, and the last place police know she was studying was Fanshawe College in London.

One factor complicating the investigation, Thom said in 2016, is that police aren’t certain who lived at the Flamborough property when Hasan was dropped off. The family owned a number of properties, both in Canada and overseas, and it is a bit vague as to which family members lived at the Flamborough farm.

“They have a number of properties, and were back and forward between Jordan and Canada,” he said in 2016. “Talking to the family members, no one can really put a timeline on that, per se.”

And while it is believed that the property was purchased by Hasan’s parents in 2006, it is unclear if they lived at the site — or just farmed the property.

Another difficulty is that it has been challenging for police to make contact with family members. Some still live in southern Ontario, and others are in the Middle East.

For those they have been able to contact, the level of co-operation has varied.

“There’s been some members of the family who have been extremely co-operative, others not so much,” Thom said.

While little is known of Hasan’s childhood, a Facebook page attributed to her lists Robert Baldwin and Sam Sherratt public schools in Milton under Education. At some point, the page was renamed "Locate Nuseiba," but posts go back only to October 2015.

One of the few confirmed facts about her childhood is that when she was 14 she was taken into the care of the Halton Children’s Aid Society and placed in a foster home for about two months.

In the aftermath, her father, Moses Hasan, erected signs on the family’s property near Milton protesting the involvement of the CAS. He also told the Milton Canadian Champion in 1995 that the CAS was bullying his family.

Moses died in 2012, and as of 2016, Nuseiba's mother lived in Jordan. Other family members — including her seven or eight siblings, are scattered.

Moses once owned a company called Bethlehem and Sons Excavating — something which led police to consider the possibility of evidence buried at the Flamborough property.

Another twist to the tale is that Nuseiba Hasan, who was 26 when she went missing, gave birth to a daughter when was about 18. The child was adopted before Hasan disappeared, and Thom said in 2016 police were aware of the child’s location.

This month, Thom said cases such as Hasan’s disappearance are very difficult to investigate. This particular case was made more difficult because investigators were forced to move quickly due to a pending demolition on the farm site.

The property was sold in March 2016, and the new owner took possession of the property in October. With plans to demolish the house on the property and rebuild, investigators were forced to jump into action.

“We had to reassess the information and move faster than we would have liked, due to the farmhouse being demolished, which would have resulted in a potential loss of evidence,” he said. “By doing so, it tipped our hand that an investigation had been initiated.”

PROPERTYSEARCH2

Police search the Flamborough property where Nuseiba Hasan was last seen. Torstar file photo

However, Thom said that since the search of the farm there has been little new information about Hasan’s disappearance — something he attributes to the locations of many of those involved with the case.

“Given the nuances of this case (such as) the delay in Nuseiba being reported missing, the familial dynamic, language and cultural difference, as well as the geographical considerations, this investigation is certainly very challenging,” he said.

As the family owned a number of different properties, Thom added, other potential areas have and are being considered.

However, he stressed the case is still an open investigation.

“We have to remember that there is a missing person, Nuseiba Hasan, who is believed to have been killed,” he said, "and that she has a daughter who wants to know what happened to her mom.”

Anyone with information about Hasan's disappearance can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or submit an anonymous tip online at www.crimestoppershamilton.com.

– With files from the Hamilton Spectator

ONTARIO COLD CASE: Young mom's disappearance reported nine years later

“It’s like she just dropped off the face of the earth in 2006, the beginning of 2007”

News Jun 13, 2019 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

In February 2015, Nuseiba Hasan was reported missing to Hamilton police.

The twist? She hadn’t been seen since 2006.

She was last seen alive when a family member dropped her off at the family’s residence, at 1207 8th Concession West in Flamborough, at night, in the fall of 2006.

The next day, she was gone. But she wasn’t reported missing for nine years.

Related Content

Investigators suspect foul play and believe she may have been murdered.

Hamilton police Det.-Sgt. Peter Thom said in 2016 that police don’t know why it took nine years for her family to report Hasan missing.

“It’s obviously something we find a bit odd,” Thom said at the time.

Hasan was described as approximately five-foot-four tall, with a slim build, and of Jordanian descent, with brown eyes and black hair.

NUSEIBA HASAN

Nuseiba Hasan was reported missing by a family member in February 2015. She was last seen alive in 2006.

The case came to light in October 2016 when the Hamilton Police Homicide Unit conducted a massive ground search of the 55-acre 8th Concession West property where Hasan was last seen. The search operation involved cadaver dogs, drones, ground-penetrating radar and a backhoe, as well as a forensic anthropologist and the mounted unit.

PROPERTYSEARCH2

Police on horseback scoured a 55-acre Flamborough property where they say Nuseiba Hasan was last seen alive in 2006. The search took place in 2016; Hasan was reported missing by a family member in February 2015. Torstar file photo

Thom said police spent the time since Hasan was reported missing in February 2015, and the ground search, trying to determine if she was, in fact, missing. Hasan was known to travel to Jordan and elsewhere in the Middle East, and the investigation attempted to determine if her driver’s licence, passport or health card had been used.

“There’s been nothing,” Thom said. “It’s like she just dropped off the face of the earth in 2006, the beginning of 2007.”

When she was last seen, Hasan was in and out of school, and the last place police know she was studying was Fanshawe College in London.

One factor complicating the investigation, Thom said in 2016, is that police aren’t certain who lived at the Flamborough property when Hasan was dropped off. The family owned a number of properties, both in Canada and overseas, and it is a bit vague as to which family members lived at the Flamborough farm.

“They have a number of properties, and were back and forward between Jordan and Canada,” he said in 2016. “Talking to the family members, no one can really put a timeline on that, per se.”

And while it is believed that the property was purchased by Hasan’s parents in 2006, it is unclear if they lived at the site — or just farmed the property.

Another difficulty is that it has been challenging for police to make contact with family members. Some still live in southern Ontario, and others are in the Middle East.

For those they have been able to contact, the level of co-operation has varied.

“There’s been some members of the family who have been extremely co-operative, others not so much,” Thom said.

While little is known of Hasan’s childhood, a Facebook page attributed to her lists Robert Baldwin and Sam Sherratt public schools in Milton under Education. At some point, the page was renamed "Locate Nuseiba," but posts go back only to October 2015.

One of the few confirmed facts about her childhood is that when she was 14 she was taken into the care of the Halton Children’s Aid Society and placed in a foster home for about two months.

In the aftermath, her father, Moses Hasan, erected signs on the family’s property near Milton protesting the involvement of the CAS. He also told the Milton Canadian Champion in 1995 that the CAS was bullying his family.

Moses died in 2012, and as of 2016, Nuseiba's mother lived in Jordan. Other family members — including her seven or eight siblings, are scattered.

Moses once owned a company called Bethlehem and Sons Excavating — something which led police to consider the possibility of evidence buried at the Flamborough property.

Another twist to the tale is that Nuseiba Hasan, who was 26 when she went missing, gave birth to a daughter when was about 18. The child was adopted before Hasan disappeared, and Thom said in 2016 police were aware of the child’s location.

This month, Thom said cases such as Hasan’s disappearance are very difficult to investigate. This particular case was made more difficult because investigators were forced to move quickly due to a pending demolition on the farm site.

The property was sold in March 2016, and the new owner took possession of the property in October. With plans to demolish the house on the property and rebuild, investigators were forced to jump into action.

“We had to reassess the information and move faster than we would have liked, due to the farmhouse being demolished, which would have resulted in a potential loss of evidence,” he said. “By doing so, it tipped our hand that an investigation had been initiated.”

PROPERTYSEARCH2

Police search the Flamborough property where Nuseiba Hasan was last seen. Torstar file photo

However, Thom said that since the search of the farm there has been little new information about Hasan’s disappearance — something he attributes to the locations of many of those involved with the case.

“Given the nuances of this case (such as) the delay in Nuseiba being reported missing, the familial dynamic, language and cultural difference, as well as the geographical considerations, this investigation is certainly very challenging,” he said.

As the family owned a number of different properties, Thom added, other potential areas have and are being considered.

However, he stressed the case is still an open investigation.

“We have to remember that there is a missing person, Nuseiba Hasan, who is believed to have been killed,” he said, "and that she has a daughter who wants to know what happened to her mom.”

Anyone with information about Hasan's disappearance can contact Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or submit an anonymous tip online at www.crimestoppershamilton.com.

– With files from the Hamilton Spectator