Hamilton tax hikes by ward: How did this year’s city budget affect your bill?

News Apr 22, 2020 by Matthew Van Dongen Hamilton Spectator

Urban homeowners in Wards 1 and 3 will once again see the highest average tax hikes as a result of rising property values.

But how many people end up being able to pay their tax bills amid the COVID-19 pandemic chaos remains to be seen.

In March, council approved a 2020 budget hike of 2.9 per cent, which works out to an “average” increase of about $120 for a Hamilton household assessed at $380,000.

But where you live and what services you receive can make a big difference in what you pay on your tax bill.

In urban Hamilton, the average tax hike is highest in Wards 1 and 3 at around 4.1 per cent, partly because of rising property values.

(The last round of provincial property assessments called for an average 27 per cent bump in Hamilton values phased in over four years, with many lower city properties seeing higher than average assessments after years of stagnation.)

In Ward 1, where the typical home is assessed at $412,500, the average 4.1 per cent hike translates into an extra $191 for taxpayers in the west end ward. In the central city Ward 3, the average home is assessed at $223,100, which means an extra $103 on the property tax bill.

In Ward 11 (Glanbrook), urban residents saw the lowest average percentage increase at 1.9 per cent, which translates into an extra $83 on a home assessed at $401,800. (Only about a quarter of properties in Glanbrook are urban.) In Ward 15 (Flamborough), urban residents saw a 2.2 per cent bump worth an extra $122 on a $532,300 home.

In both cases, reassessment and area-rated transit changes contributed to the smaller relative tax hike.

For rural homeowners — those paying for volunteer firefighting and no transit — the tax hike largely hovered around three per cent, with the average dollar increase ranging from as low as $108 in Glanbrook to as high as $160 in Ward 15 (east Flamborough.)

A full list of ward-by-ward tax hikes (based on differing service levels) is available on the city website at hamilton.ca.

Despite the council-approved budget bump, COVID-19 is expected to punch major holes in the city’s finances this year and beyond, with a $23-million deficit forecast by the end of May.

Council voted earlier this month to allow a 60-day grace period without penalties or interest for residents who can’t make a scheduled April 30 property tax payment. (You are still expected to pay, however.)

Another 30-day grace period will be allowed for those who can’t make the following June 30 payment date.

Matthew Van Dongen is a Hamilton-based reporter covering transportation for The Spectator. Reach him via email: mvandongen@thespec.com

Average tax hike by ward (urban Hamilton)

  • Ward 1: 4.1% or extra $191 for home assessed at $412,500
  • Ward 2: 3.7% or extra $120 for home assessed at $285,200
  • Ward 3: 4.1% or extra $103 for home assessed at $223,100
  • Ward 4: 3.1% or extra $83 for home assessed at $232,800
  • Ward 5: 2.6% or extra $92 for home assessed at $312,700
  • Ward 6: 2.6% or extra $99 for home assessed at $332,600
  • Ward 7: 2.9% or extra $114 for home assessed at $337,700
  • Ward 8: 2.8% or extra $121 for home assessed at $366,900
  • Ward 9: 2.5% or extra $106 for home assessed at $392,900
  • Ward 10: 2.6% or extra $119 for home assessed at $425,300
  • Ward 11: 1.9% or extra $83 for home assessed at $401,800
  • Ward 12: 2.6% or extra $147 for home assessed at $533,500
  • Ward 13: 2.4% or extra $121 for home assessed at $484,300
  • Ward 14: 2.8% or extra $129 for home assessed at $405,500
  • Ward 15: 2.2% or extra $126 for home assessed at $532,300

Hamilton tax hikes by ward: How did this year’s city budget affect your bill?

The average tax hike is highest in Wards 1 and 3 and lowest in Ward 11 Glanbrook.

News Apr 22, 2020 by Matthew Van Dongen Hamilton Spectator

Urban homeowners in Wards 1 and 3 will once again see the highest average tax hikes as a result of rising property values.

But how many people end up being able to pay their tax bills amid the COVID-19 pandemic chaos remains to be seen.

In March, council approved a 2020 budget hike of 2.9 per cent, which works out to an “average” increase of about $120 for a Hamilton household assessed at $380,000.

But where you live and what services you receive can make a big difference in what you pay on your tax bill.

Related Content

In urban Hamilton, the average tax hike is highest in Wards 1 and 3 at around 4.1 per cent, partly because of rising property values.

(The last round of provincial property assessments called for an average 27 per cent bump in Hamilton values phased in over four years, with many lower city properties seeing higher than average assessments after years of stagnation.)

In Ward 1, where the typical home is assessed at $412,500, the average 4.1 per cent hike translates into an extra $191 for taxpayers in the west end ward. In the central city Ward 3, the average home is assessed at $223,100, which means an extra $103 on the property tax bill.

In Ward 11 (Glanbrook), urban residents saw the lowest average percentage increase at 1.9 per cent, which translates into an extra $83 on a home assessed at $401,800. (Only about a quarter of properties in Glanbrook are urban.) In Ward 15 (Flamborough), urban residents saw a 2.2 per cent bump worth an extra $122 on a $532,300 home.

In both cases, reassessment and area-rated transit changes contributed to the smaller relative tax hike.

For rural homeowners — those paying for volunteer firefighting and no transit — the tax hike largely hovered around three per cent, with the average dollar increase ranging from as low as $108 in Glanbrook to as high as $160 in Ward 15 (east Flamborough.)

A full list of ward-by-ward tax hikes (based on differing service levels) is available on the city website at hamilton.ca.

Despite the council-approved budget bump, COVID-19 is expected to punch major holes in the city’s finances this year and beyond, with a $23-million deficit forecast by the end of May.

Council voted earlier this month to allow a 60-day grace period without penalties or interest for residents who can’t make a scheduled April 30 property tax payment. (You are still expected to pay, however.)

Another 30-day grace period will be allowed for those who can’t make the following June 30 payment date.

Matthew Van Dongen is a Hamilton-based reporter covering transportation for The Spectator. Reach him via email: mvandongen@thespec.com

Average tax hike by ward (urban Hamilton)

  • Ward 1: 4.1% or extra $191 for home assessed at $412,500
  • Ward 2: 3.7% or extra $120 for home assessed at $285,200
  • Ward 3: 4.1% or extra $103 for home assessed at $223,100
  • Ward 4: 3.1% or extra $83 for home assessed at $232,800
  • Ward 5: 2.6% or extra $92 for home assessed at $312,700
  • Ward 6: 2.6% or extra $99 for home assessed at $332,600
  • Ward 7: 2.9% or extra $114 for home assessed at $337,700
  • Ward 8: 2.8% or extra $121 for home assessed at $366,900
  • Ward 9: 2.5% or extra $106 for home assessed at $392,900
  • Ward 10: 2.6% or extra $119 for home assessed at $425,300
  • Ward 11: 1.9% or extra $83 for home assessed at $401,800
  • Ward 12: 2.6% or extra $147 for home assessed at $533,500
  • Ward 13: 2.4% or extra $121 for home assessed at $484,300
  • Ward 14: 2.8% or extra $129 for home assessed at $405,500
  • Ward 15: 2.2% or extra $126 for home assessed at $532,300

Hamilton tax hikes by ward: How did this year’s city budget affect your bill?

The average tax hike is highest in Wards 1 and 3 and lowest in Ward 11 Glanbrook.

News Apr 22, 2020 by Matthew Van Dongen Hamilton Spectator

Urban homeowners in Wards 1 and 3 will once again see the highest average tax hikes as a result of rising property values.

But how many people end up being able to pay their tax bills amid the COVID-19 pandemic chaos remains to be seen.

In March, council approved a 2020 budget hike of 2.9 per cent, which works out to an “average” increase of about $120 for a Hamilton household assessed at $380,000.

But where you live and what services you receive can make a big difference in what you pay on your tax bill.

Related Content

In urban Hamilton, the average tax hike is highest in Wards 1 and 3 at around 4.1 per cent, partly because of rising property values.

(The last round of provincial property assessments called for an average 27 per cent bump in Hamilton values phased in over four years, with many lower city properties seeing higher than average assessments after years of stagnation.)

In Ward 1, where the typical home is assessed at $412,500, the average 4.1 per cent hike translates into an extra $191 for taxpayers in the west end ward. In the central city Ward 3, the average home is assessed at $223,100, which means an extra $103 on the property tax bill.

In Ward 11 (Glanbrook), urban residents saw the lowest average percentage increase at 1.9 per cent, which translates into an extra $83 on a home assessed at $401,800. (Only about a quarter of properties in Glanbrook are urban.) In Ward 15 (Flamborough), urban residents saw a 2.2 per cent bump worth an extra $122 on a $532,300 home.

In both cases, reassessment and area-rated transit changes contributed to the smaller relative tax hike.

For rural homeowners — those paying for volunteer firefighting and no transit — the tax hike largely hovered around three per cent, with the average dollar increase ranging from as low as $108 in Glanbrook to as high as $160 in Ward 15 (east Flamborough.)

A full list of ward-by-ward tax hikes (based on differing service levels) is available on the city website at hamilton.ca.

Despite the council-approved budget bump, COVID-19 is expected to punch major holes in the city’s finances this year and beyond, with a $23-million deficit forecast by the end of May.

Council voted earlier this month to allow a 60-day grace period without penalties or interest for residents who can’t make a scheduled April 30 property tax payment. (You are still expected to pay, however.)

Another 30-day grace period will be allowed for those who can’t make the following June 30 payment date.

Matthew Van Dongen is a Hamilton-based reporter covering transportation for The Spectator. Reach him via email: mvandongen@thespec.com

Average tax hike by ward (urban Hamilton)

  • Ward 1: 4.1% or extra $191 for home assessed at $412,500
  • Ward 2: 3.7% or extra $120 for home assessed at $285,200
  • Ward 3: 4.1% or extra $103 for home assessed at $223,100
  • Ward 4: 3.1% or extra $83 for home assessed at $232,800
  • Ward 5: 2.6% or extra $92 for home assessed at $312,700
  • Ward 6: 2.6% or extra $99 for home assessed at $332,600
  • Ward 7: 2.9% or extra $114 for home assessed at $337,700
  • Ward 8: 2.8% or extra $121 for home assessed at $366,900
  • Ward 9: 2.5% or extra $106 for home assessed at $392,900
  • Ward 10: 2.6% or extra $119 for home assessed at $425,300
  • Ward 11: 1.9% or extra $83 for home assessed at $401,800
  • Ward 12: 2.6% or extra $147 for home assessed at $533,500
  • Ward 13: 2.4% or extra $121 for home assessed at $484,300
  • Ward 14: 2.8% or extra $129 for home assessed at $405,500
  • Ward 15: 2.2% or extra $126 for home assessed at $532,300