How to avoid holiday meltdowns

Opinion Dec 03, 2020 by Meaghan Jackson Flamborough Review

Every year someone, usually a child, will inevitably have a meltdown in the middle of a holiday party or important day. It can be stressful and embarrassing. This adds to our own anxiety about the holiday season. Learn some tricks to avoid this from happening. Should a meltdown occur, you can handle it with grace and empathy.

One of the best ways to prevent a meltdown is to maintain as much consistency as possible during the holiday season. Children thrive on predictability. Major changes and events cause them undue stress, which leads to challenging behavior.

• Balance busy days with calm days

• Eat healthy foods often and limit sugar (so hard I know)

• Keep a predictable daily rhythm even if travelling

• Get plenty of exercise even as the weather gets colder

• Sleep is also important so keep naps and bedtimes the same

• Focus on connection over the holidays

• Remember your favourite holiday memories. It is in the daily special moments that memories are made.

• Don’t hype up the holiday season so much. Children often don’t know what day of the week it is. All the countdowns and asking if they are excited makes them believe that each holiday should be magical and over the top.

• Anticipate triggers. The most common would be sleep, hunger, sensory issues, party anxiety and gift giving.

Assuming that you have done all you can to prevent any troubles, emotions often run high and children can get upset. Take time to remember that this is not an emergency and happens to everyone. Always focus on connection before correction. Your relationship with your child is far more important than a few awkward stares.

What to do during a tantrum:

• Offer empathy and listen to their side of the story

• Regulate your own emotions. Check in with yourself, make sure you are able to remain calm. Offer yourself empathy

• Consider the actual needs behind the feelings or behavior

• Problem solve solutions

• Set loving limits if necessary to keep everyone safe

• Remember that this is not an emergency but a child struggling

May your holiday season be one of calm, peace and joy.

Waterdown's Meaghan Jackson is a parenting and homeschooling coach and owner of Joyful Mud Puddles. Reach her at joyfulmudpudles@gmail.com.

How to avoid holiday meltdowns

Children thrive on predictability so maintain consistency, writes Jackson

Opinion Dec 03, 2020 by Meaghan Jackson Flamborough Review

Every year someone, usually a child, will inevitably have a meltdown in the middle of a holiday party or important day. It can be stressful and embarrassing. This adds to our own anxiety about the holiday season. Learn some tricks to avoid this from happening. Should a meltdown occur, you can handle it with grace and empathy.

One of the best ways to prevent a meltdown is to maintain as much consistency as possible during the holiday season. Children thrive on predictability. Major changes and events cause them undue stress, which leads to challenging behavior.

• Balance busy days with calm days

• Eat healthy foods often and limit sugar (so hard I know)

Related Content

• Keep a predictable daily rhythm even if travelling

• Get plenty of exercise even as the weather gets colder

• Sleep is also important so keep naps and bedtimes the same

• Focus on connection over the holidays

• Remember your favourite holiday memories. It is in the daily special moments that memories are made.

• Don’t hype up the holiday season so much. Children often don’t know what day of the week it is. All the countdowns and asking if they are excited makes them believe that each holiday should be magical and over the top.

• Anticipate triggers. The most common would be sleep, hunger, sensory issues, party anxiety and gift giving.

Assuming that you have done all you can to prevent any troubles, emotions often run high and children can get upset. Take time to remember that this is not an emergency and happens to everyone. Always focus on connection before correction. Your relationship with your child is far more important than a few awkward stares.

What to do during a tantrum:

• Offer empathy and listen to their side of the story

• Regulate your own emotions. Check in with yourself, make sure you are able to remain calm. Offer yourself empathy

• Consider the actual needs behind the feelings or behavior

• Problem solve solutions

• Set loving limits if necessary to keep everyone safe

• Remember that this is not an emergency but a child struggling

May your holiday season be one of calm, peace and joy.

Waterdown's Meaghan Jackson is a parenting and homeschooling coach and owner of Joyful Mud Puddles. Reach her at joyfulmudpudles@gmail.com.

How to avoid holiday meltdowns

Children thrive on predictability so maintain consistency, writes Jackson

Opinion Dec 03, 2020 by Meaghan Jackson Flamborough Review

Every year someone, usually a child, will inevitably have a meltdown in the middle of a holiday party or important day. It can be stressful and embarrassing. This adds to our own anxiety about the holiday season. Learn some tricks to avoid this from happening. Should a meltdown occur, you can handle it with grace and empathy.

One of the best ways to prevent a meltdown is to maintain as much consistency as possible during the holiday season. Children thrive on predictability. Major changes and events cause them undue stress, which leads to challenging behavior.

• Balance busy days with calm days

• Eat healthy foods often and limit sugar (so hard I know)

Related Content

• Keep a predictable daily rhythm even if travelling

• Get plenty of exercise even as the weather gets colder

• Sleep is also important so keep naps and bedtimes the same

• Focus on connection over the holidays

• Remember your favourite holiday memories. It is in the daily special moments that memories are made.

• Don’t hype up the holiday season so much. Children often don’t know what day of the week it is. All the countdowns and asking if they are excited makes them believe that each holiday should be magical and over the top.

• Anticipate triggers. The most common would be sleep, hunger, sensory issues, party anxiety and gift giving.

Assuming that you have done all you can to prevent any troubles, emotions often run high and children can get upset. Take time to remember that this is not an emergency and happens to everyone. Always focus on connection before correction. Your relationship with your child is far more important than a few awkward stares.

What to do during a tantrum:

• Offer empathy and listen to their side of the story

• Regulate your own emotions. Check in with yourself, make sure you are able to remain calm. Offer yourself empathy

• Consider the actual needs behind the feelings or behavior

• Problem solve solutions

• Set loving limits if necessary to keep everyone safe

• Remember that this is not an emergency but a child struggling

May your holiday season be one of calm, peace and joy.

Waterdown's Meaghan Jackson is a parenting and homeschooling coach and owner of Joyful Mud Puddles. Reach her at joyfulmudpudles@gmail.com.