EDITORIAL: Workplace safety critical for everyone

Opinion Mar 22, 2016 Grimsby Lincoln News

Related content

Ag safety: we can do better     March 16, 2016

George Kloser, in his speech to launch Canadian Agriculture Safety Week at Vineland Research and Innovation Centre, said it best.

As far as we’ve come in terms of agriculture safety, there is much more work to do. Sadly there are still deaths happening across the country on working farms, and as Kloser noted, we can and must do better.

Events like Ag Safety Week are important — it’s a chance to talk about how things are done and brainstorm ideas on how they can be done differently and most important, safer. But it also takes much more to implement the ideas that come out of those brainstorming sessions.

Kudos to the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) which has now started to establish a comprehensive policy on farm safety and is lobbying the government to fund farm safety programs. Being able to go beyond the talk and come up with an implementation plan is crucial or all this discussion is for naught.

As CFA President Ron Bonnett pointed out, there has been a cultural shift over the past several decades. Something as simple as children riding in their parents’ laps on tractors or haphazard handling of farm materials are no longer the norm as the safety message spreads.

The problem is, there is no cookie-cutter approach when it comes to farm safety. There are so many different, unique, agricultural operations, so each has its own hazards or dangers to plan and prepare for. So while there are great supports in place through the Health and Safety Act to protect workers, there also needs to be a balance that places an emphasis on farm-appropriate safety practices too. With such a broad range of businesses, that becomes a challenge.

The bottom line, though, is that whether you’re on a farm or not, workplace safety should be a priority 365 days a year. It’s not about creating a burden of regulation and legislation, it’s about improving the culture of workplaces and reducing workplace injury, illness and deaths.

You don’t have to be a government official or a company supervisor or manager to be engaged. It’s about a partnership approach where employers, supervisors, workers, their health and safety associations and the government all take responsibility for health and safety in the workplace, leading to the elimination of workplace injuries and deaths.

Much like how the farm community is working on prevention, the business community at large needs to ensure preventative systems are in place for their own operations. A commitment to health and safety should form an integral part of all organizations, no matter what the line of work.

Whether you work on a farm or not, workplace safety truly is everyone’s business.

EDITORIAL: Workplace safety critical for everyone

Opinion Mar 22, 2016 Grimsby Lincoln News

Related content

Ag safety: we can do better     March 16, 2016

George Kloser, in his speech to launch Canadian Agriculture Safety Week at Vineland Research and Innovation Centre, said it best.

As far as we’ve come in terms of agriculture safety, there is much more work to do. Sadly there are still deaths happening across the country on working farms, and as Kloser noted, we can and must do better.

Events like Ag Safety Week are important — it’s a chance to talk about how things are done and brainstorm ideas on how they can be done differently and most important, safer. But it also takes much more to implement the ideas that come out of those brainstorming sessions.

Kudos to the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) which has now started to establish a comprehensive policy on farm safety and is lobbying the government to fund farm safety programs. Being able to go beyond the talk and come up with an implementation plan is crucial or all this discussion is for naught.

As CFA President Ron Bonnett pointed out, there has been a cultural shift over the past several decades. Something as simple as children riding in their parents’ laps on tractors or haphazard handling of farm materials are no longer the norm as the safety message spreads.

The problem is, there is no cookie-cutter approach when it comes to farm safety. There are so many different, unique, agricultural operations, so each has its own hazards or dangers to plan and prepare for. So while there are great supports in place through the Health and Safety Act to protect workers, there also needs to be a balance that places an emphasis on farm-appropriate safety practices too. With such a broad range of businesses, that becomes a challenge.

The bottom line, though, is that whether you’re on a farm or not, workplace safety should be a priority 365 days a year. It’s not about creating a burden of regulation and legislation, it’s about improving the culture of workplaces and reducing workplace injury, illness and deaths.

You don’t have to be a government official or a company supervisor or manager to be engaged. It’s about a partnership approach where employers, supervisors, workers, their health and safety associations and the government all take responsibility for health and safety in the workplace, leading to the elimination of workplace injuries and deaths.

Much like how the farm community is working on prevention, the business community at large needs to ensure preventative systems are in place for their own operations. A commitment to health and safety should form an integral part of all organizations, no matter what the line of work.

Whether you work on a farm or not, workplace safety truly is everyone’s business.

EDITORIAL: Workplace safety critical for everyone

Opinion Mar 22, 2016 Grimsby Lincoln News

Related content

Ag safety: we can do better     March 16, 2016

George Kloser, in his speech to launch Canadian Agriculture Safety Week at Vineland Research and Innovation Centre, said it best.

As far as we’ve come in terms of agriculture safety, there is much more work to do. Sadly there are still deaths happening across the country on working farms, and as Kloser noted, we can and must do better.

Events like Ag Safety Week are important — it’s a chance to talk about how things are done and brainstorm ideas on how they can be done differently and most important, safer. But it also takes much more to implement the ideas that come out of those brainstorming sessions.

Kudos to the Canadian Federation of Agriculture (CFA) which has now started to establish a comprehensive policy on farm safety and is lobbying the government to fund farm safety programs. Being able to go beyond the talk and come up with an implementation plan is crucial or all this discussion is for naught.

As CFA President Ron Bonnett pointed out, there has been a cultural shift over the past several decades. Something as simple as children riding in their parents’ laps on tractors or haphazard handling of farm materials are no longer the norm as the safety message spreads.

The problem is, there is no cookie-cutter approach when it comes to farm safety. There are so many different, unique, agricultural operations, so each has its own hazards or dangers to plan and prepare for. So while there are great supports in place through the Health and Safety Act to protect workers, there also needs to be a balance that places an emphasis on farm-appropriate safety practices too. With such a broad range of businesses, that becomes a challenge.

The bottom line, though, is that whether you’re on a farm or not, workplace safety should be a priority 365 days a year. It’s not about creating a burden of regulation and legislation, it’s about improving the culture of workplaces and reducing workplace injury, illness and deaths.

You don’t have to be a government official or a company supervisor or manager to be engaged. It’s about a partnership approach where employers, supervisors, workers, their health and safety associations and the government all take responsibility for health and safety in the workplace, leading to the elimination of workplace injuries and deaths.

Much like how the farm community is working on prevention, the business community at large needs to ensure preventative systems are in place for their own operations. A commitment to health and safety should form an integral part of all organizations, no matter what the line of work.

Whether you work on a farm or not, workplace safety truly is everyone’s business.