MOORE: Don’t judge a breed by an owner’s negligence

Opinion Mar 22, 2016 by Amanda Moore Grimsby Lincoln News

There are no bad dog breeds. Only bad dog owners.

That is the real story behind tragic events that unfolded in Toronto recently that have some calling for the ban of another dog breed, one that I happen to love. In the unfortunate incident that took place in Toronto there was a little daschund being walked by his 81-year-old owner. A pack of larger dogs, reportedly cane corso, attacked the smaller one, and the tragic outcome was that Dacky the Daschund lost his life.

 In the better part of 10 years that I have spent around cane corsos, I understand why they have this type of interest in small animals, however instinctual it may be; this is no excuse for their actions. What is clear to me is that these actions were caused by the sole negligence of the owner of the four dogs involved.

I am the proud owner of three cane corsos. They are Italian mastiffs, traditionally used as farming dogs — not Roman war dogs as one Toronto media outlet boasted in a headline. The name derives from the Latin “cohors”, which means “protector, guardian of farms, courtyards and enclosed property.” The breed made its first appearance in the 16th century and was used mainly for hunting and guard duties. I’m not sure from where the reporter got their information, but they certainly didn’t look to the Cane Corso Club of Canada, a group of dedicated dog owners who have worked hard to build a good reputation for the breed. But hey, I guess they have to sell newspapers.

This is a strong-willed breed, and it is certainly not for everyone. They require a dominant owner and a great deal of training. They can be incredible family pets in the right hands. Are they your average yellow lab? Certainly not.

Now as a result of the tragedy in Toronto, we have people calling for a similar fate to that of the “pit bull” for my beloved breed — adding them to the list of those banned in Ontario under the Dog Owner’s Liability Act.

As those opposed to the ban say, “punish the deed, not the breed.” The problem isn’t pit bulls or cane corsos, the problem is irresponsible owners.

Now, I don’t know the owner of the four dogs in question, which have since been seized by the Toronto Humane Society along with a fifth dog living in the home, but I know enough about the breed to come to the conclusion that he is irresponsible. Letting four corsos run at large in a public space is a bad idea. Even walking four of these guys on leash is a bad idea. The average male weighs between 100 and 125 lbs., multiply that by four and that’s a lot of weight for anyone to control.

Sensationalizing this incident does a lot more harm than good. Thousands of “pit bulls” have been euthanized as a result of Ontario’s ban on the breed, and while using terms like “Roman warrior dog” may sell a few newspapers, it also hurts an image that people have worked a long time to build. The media has a responsibility to report the truth, but often times that responsibility is overshadowed by the need to draw hits to a website or sell papers. If that Toronto reporter had done their homework, they would have learned the real history of the cane corso. The top hits on Google describe the breed as a guardian and hunter, not a fighting dog. Maybe she got her information by watching an episode of Showtime’s Borgias in which the Romans used cane corsos to hunt man in an episode. I mean, Hollywood is usually a reliable source.

My heart breaks for Dacky’s owner. But my heart also breaks for the five dogs whose fate is likely sealed because of the completely negligent actions of their owner.

MOORE: Don’t judge a breed by an owner’s negligence

Opinion Mar 22, 2016 by Amanda Moore Grimsby Lincoln News

There are no bad dog breeds. Only bad dog owners.

That is the real story behind tragic events that unfolded in Toronto recently that have some calling for the ban of another dog breed, one that I happen to love. In the unfortunate incident that took place in Toronto there was a little daschund being walked by his 81-year-old owner. A pack of larger dogs, reportedly cane corso, attacked the smaller one, and the tragic outcome was that Dacky the Daschund lost his life.

 In the better part of 10 years that I have spent around cane corsos, I understand why they have this type of interest in small animals, however instinctual it may be; this is no excuse for their actions. What is clear to me is that these actions were caused by the sole negligence of the owner of the four dogs involved.

I am the proud owner of three cane corsos. They are Italian mastiffs, traditionally used as farming dogs — not Roman war dogs as one Toronto media outlet boasted in a headline. The name derives from the Latin “cohors”, which means “protector, guardian of farms, courtyards and enclosed property.” The breed made its first appearance in the 16th century and was used mainly for hunting and guard duties. I’m not sure from where the reporter got their information, but they certainly didn’t look to the Cane Corso Club of Canada, a group of dedicated dog owners who have worked hard to build a good reputation for the breed. But hey, I guess they have to sell newspapers.

This is a strong-willed breed, and it is certainly not for everyone. They require a dominant owner and a great deal of training. They can be incredible family pets in the right hands. Are they your average yellow lab? Certainly not.

Now as a result of the tragedy in Toronto, we have people calling for a similar fate to that of the “pit bull” for my beloved breed — adding them to the list of those banned in Ontario under the Dog Owner’s Liability Act.

As those opposed to the ban say, “punish the deed, not the breed.” The problem isn’t pit bulls or cane corsos, the problem is irresponsible owners.

Now, I don’t know the owner of the four dogs in question, which have since been seized by the Toronto Humane Society along with a fifth dog living in the home, but I know enough about the breed to come to the conclusion that he is irresponsible. Letting four corsos run at large in a public space is a bad idea. Even walking four of these guys on leash is a bad idea. The average male weighs between 100 and 125 lbs., multiply that by four and that’s a lot of weight for anyone to control.

Sensationalizing this incident does a lot more harm than good. Thousands of “pit bulls” have been euthanized as a result of Ontario’s ban on the breed, and while using terms like “Roman warrior dog” may sell a few newspapers, it also hurts an image that people have worked a long time to build. The media has a responsibility to report the truth, but often times that responsibility is overshadowed by the need to draw hits to a website or sell papers. If that Toronto reporter had done their homework, they would have learned the real history of the cane corso. The top hits on Google describe the breed as a guardian and hunter, not a fighting dog. Maybe she got her information by watching an episode of Showtime’s Borgias in which the Romans used cane corsos to hunt man in an episode. I mean, Hollywood is usually a reliable source.

My heart breaks for Dacky’s owner. But my heart also breaks for the five dogs whose fate is likely sealed because of the completely negligent actions of their owner.

MOORE: Don’t judge a breed by an owner’s negligence

Opinion Mar 22, 2016 by Amanda Moore Grimsby Lincoln News

There are no bad dog breeds. Only bad dog owners.

That is the real story behind tragic events that unfolded in Toronto recently that have some calling for the ban of another dog breed, one that I happen to love. In the unfortunate incident that took place in Toronto there was a little daschund being walked by his 81-year-old owner. A pack of larger dogs, reportedly cane corso, attacked the smaller one, and the tragic outcome was that Dacky the Daschund lost his life.

 In the better part of 10 years that I have spent around cane corsos, I understand why they have this type of interest in small animals, however instinctual it may be; this is no excuse for their actions. What is clear to me is that these actions were caused by the sole negligence of the owner of the four dogs involved.

I am the proud owner of three cane corsos. They are Italian mastiffs, traditionally used as farming dogs — not Roman war dogs as one Toronto media outlet boasted in a headline. The name derives from the Latin “cohors”, which means “protector, guardian of farms, courtyards and enclosed property.” The breed made its first appearance in the 16th century and was used mainly for hunting and guard duties. I’m not sure from where the reporter got their information, but they certainly didn’t look to the Cane Corso Club of Canada, a group of dedicated dog owners who have worked hard to build a good reputation for the breed. But hey, I guess they have to sell newspapers.

This is a strong-willed breed, and it is certainly not for everyone. They require a dominant owner and a great deal of training. They can be incredible family pets in the right hands. Are they your average yellow lab? Certainly not.

Now as a result of the tragedy in Toronto, we have people calling for a similar fate to that of the “pit bull” for my beloved breed — adding them to the list of those banned in Ontario under the Dog Owner’s Liability Act.

As those opposed to the ban say, “punish the deed, not the breed.” The problem isn’t pit bulls or cane corsos, the problem is irresponsible owners.

Now, I don’t know the owner of the four dogs in question, which have since been seized by the Toronto Humane Society along with a fifth dog living in the home, but I know enough about the breed to come to the conclusion that he is irresponsible. Letting four corsos run at large in a public space is a bad idea. Even walking four of these guys on leash is a bad idea. The average male weighs between 100 and 125 lbs., multiply that by four and that’s a lot of weight for anyone to control.

Sensationalizing this incident does a lot more harm than good. Thousands of “pit bulls” have been euthanized as a result of Ontario’s ban on the breed, and while using terms like “Roman warrior dog” may sell a few newspapers, it also hurts an image that people have worked a long time to build. The media has a responsibility to report the truth, but often times that responsibility is overshadowed by the need to draw hits to a website or sell papers. If that Toronto reporter had done their homework, they would have learned the real history of the cane corso. The top hits on Google describe the breed as a guardian and hunter, not a fighting dog. Maybe she got her information by watching an episode of Showtime’s Borgias in which the Romans used cane corsos to hunt man in an episode. I mean, Hollywood is usually a reliable source.

My heart breaks for Dacky’s owner. But my heart also breaks for the five dogs whose fate is likely sealed because of the completely negligent actions of their owner.