The Hateful Eight arrives on DVD

Opinion Mar 24, 2016 by Peter Howell OurWindsor.Ca

The Hateful Eight

2.5 out of 4 stars

Has Quentin Tarantino shot his bolt? This isn’t close to the glory days of Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs or even Inglourious Basterds, although any film that gives Samuel L. Jackson a chance to talk and glower at length is a film worth seeing.

Resurrected from the trash, The Hateful Eight script lacks the snap, crackle and pop of Tarantino’s cultural riffs of old. His pen needs new ink — the repeated use of a hateful racial epithet is extreme even by QT’s standards.

Worst still is the violence, although not so much the cartoonish blood spill you’d expect from a snowbound room of seven ruthless men (Jackson, Kurt Russell, Tim Roth, Damian Bichir, Bruce Dern, Michael Madsen, Walton Goggins) and one tough woman (Oscar-nommed Jennifer Jason Leigh). It’s the unconscionable beatings delivered to that woman, Leigh’s bounty-hunter prisoner Daisy Domergue, which frankly border on sadism.

Tarantino may have owned up to the deficiencies of his tale by making such a big deal of its early “road show” presentation in Ultra Panavision 70 mm, replete with overture, intermission and a custom-made Sergio Leone score.

The visuals are superb, even though the camera rarely leaves that single Wyoming haberdashery of hostility. But a Tarantino film should be more than just great cinematography.

Extras include making-of featurettes plus music tracks.

Toronto Star

The Hateful Eight arrives on DVD

The Hateful Eight leaves much to be desired

Opinion Mar 24, 2016 by Peter Howell OurWindsor.Ca

The Hateful Eight

2.5 out of 4 stars

Has Quentin Tarantino shot his bolt? This isn’t close to the glory days of Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs or even Inglourious Basterds, although any film that gives Samuel L. Jackson a chance to talk and glower at length is a film worth seeing.

Resurrected from the trash, The Hateful Eight script lacks the snap, crackle and pop of Tarantino’s cultural riffs of old. His pen needs new ink — the repeated use of a hateful racial epithet is extreme even by QT’s standards.

Worst still is the violence, although not so much the cartoonish blood spill you’d expect from a snowbound room of seven ruthless men (Jackson, Kurt Russell, Tim Roth, Damian Bichir, Bruce Dern, Michael Madsen, Walton Goggins) and one tough woman (Oscar-nommed Jennifer Jason Leigh). It’s the unconscionable beatings delivered to that woman, Leigh’s bounty-hunter prisoner Daisy Domergue, which frankly border on sadism.

Tarantino may have owned up to the deficiencies of his tale by making such a big deal of its early “road show” presentation in Ultra Panavision 70 mm, replete with overture, intermission and a custom-made Sergio Leone score.

The visuals are superb, even though the camera rarely leaves that single Wyoming haberdashery of hostility. But a Tarantino film should be more than just great cinematography.

Extras include making-of featurettes plus music tracks.

Toronto Star

The Hateful Eight arrives on DVD

The Hateful Eight leaves much to be desired

Opinion Mar 24, 2016 by Peter Howell OurWindsor.Ca

The Hateful Eight

2.5 out of 4 stars

Has Quentin Tarantino shot his bolt? This isn’t close to the glory days of Pulp Fiction, Reservoir Dogs or even Inglourious Basterds, although any film that gives Samuel L. Jackson a chance to talk and glower at length is a film worth seeing.

Resurrected from the trash, The Hateful Eight script lacks the snap, crackle and pop of Tarantino’s cultural riffs of old. His pen needs new ink — the repeated use of a hateful racial epithet is extreme even by QT’s standards.

Worst still is the violence, although not so much the cartoonish blood spill you’d expect from a snowbound room of seven ruthless men (Jackson, Kurt Russell, Tim Roth, Damian Bichir, Bruce Dern, Michael Madsen, Walton Goggins) and one tough woman (Oscar-nommed Jennifer Jason Leigh). It’s the unconscionable beatings delivered to that woman, Leigh’s bounty-hunter prisoner Daisy Domergue, which frankly border on sadism.

Tarantino may have owned up to the deficiencies of his tale by making such a big deal of its early “road show” presentation in Ultra Panavision 70 mm, replete with overture, intermission and a custom-made Sergio Leone score.

The visuals are superb, even though the camera rarely leaves that single Wyoming haberdashery of hostility. But a Tarantino film should be more than just great cinematography.

Extras include making-of featurettes plus music tracks.

Toronto Star