Doc chases both the legend and science of the Fastball: review

Opinion Mar 24, 2016 by Peter Howell OurWindsor.Ca

Batters can’t always see a fastball, but they sure can hear it: “It sounds like trouble,” says ex-Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter.

He’s one of many baseball stars who weigh in on Fastball, a doc by ESPN director Jonathan Hock that really clocks the most storied pitch of the game. With Kevin Costner narrating, Hock illuminates and entertains as he sketches portraits of the greats, from original fireballer Walter Johnson to the indomitable Nolan Ryan.

Combining rare archival footage with contemporary interviews, Hock chases both the legend and science of the fastball, something that couldn’t even be precisely measured until the radar gun arrived in the 1970s.

We learn why there’s a world of difference between a 92 mph ball and a 100 mph one, and why physicists dispute batters’ claim of a “rise” over the plate.

Don’t listen to them, record hitter Hank Aaron says: “I don’t believe they ever played baseball.”

Toronto Star

Doc chases both the legend and science of the Fastball: review

Opinion Mar 24, 2016 by Peter Howell OurWindsor.Ca

Batters can’t always see a fastball, but they sure can hear it: “It sounds like trouble,” says ex-Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter.

He’s one of many baseball stars who weigh in on Fastball, a doc by ESPN director Jonathan Hock that really clocks the most storied pitch of the game. With Kevin Costner narrating, Hock illuminates and entertains as he sketches portraits of the greats, from original fireballer Walter Johnson to the indomitable Nolan Ryan.

Combining rare archival footage with contemporary interviews, Hock chases both the legend and science of the fastball, something that couldn’t even be precisely measured until the radar gun arrived in the 1970s.

We learn why there’s a world of difference between a 92 mph ball and a 100 mph one, and why physicists dispute batters’ claim of a “rise” over the plate.

Don’t listen to them, record hitter Hank Aaron says: “I don’t believe they ever played baseball.”

Toronto Star

Doc chases both the legend and science of the Fastball: review

Opinion Mar 24, 2016 by Peter Howell OurWindsor.Ca

Batters can’t always see a fastball, but they sure can hear it: “It sounds like trouble,” says ex-Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter.

He’s one of many baseball stars who weigh in on Fastball, a doc by ESPN director Jonathan Hock that really clocks the most storied pitch of the game. With Kevin Costner narrating, Hock illuminates and entertains as he sketches portraits of the greats, from original fireballer Walter Johnson to the indomitable Nolan Ryan.

Combining rare archival footage with contemporary interviews, Hock chases both the legend and science of the fastball, something that couldn’t even be precisely measured until the radar gun arrived in the 1970s.

We learn why there’s a world of difference between a 92 mph ball and a 100 mph one, and why physicists dispute batters’ claim of a “rise” over the plate.

Don’t listen to them, record hitter Hank Aaron says: “I don’t believe they ever played baseball.”

Toronto Star