Standing up against abuse

Opinion Mar 28, 2016 Cambridge Times

No matter how you feel about the outcome of the Jian Ghomeshi sexual assault trial, two things are certain.

One, sexual assault victims will be less likely to come forward and present a complaint. Fears of the scrutiny they may face are no doubt stronger than ever.

Hopefully that is a short-term situation.

Two, the allegations against Ghomeshi – the former CBC personality was acquitted last week of one count of choking to overcome resistance and four counts of sexual assault – sparked numerous conversations nationwide about sexual assault and consent.

Hopefully those conversations lead to a better understanding of sexual assault and eventually inspire more victims to come forward, potentially saving others from the same fate.

Women and girls are the victim of abuse – sexual and otherwise – and harassment every day in Cambridge, just as they are elsewhere in Ontario and throughout the world.

According to figures recently provided by the provincial government, one-in-three women is sexually assaulted at some point during her life. The same goes for one-in-six men.

There were 511 acts of sexual violence reported to Waterloo Regional Police last year alone, though we all know these assaults are under-reported.

This is unacceptable and we must all stand up against it.

Standing up against abuse

Opinion Mar 28, 2016 Cambridge Times

No matter how you feel about the outcome of the Jian Ghomeshi sexual assault trial, two things are certain.

One, sexual assault victims will be less likely to come forward and present a complaint. Fears of the scrutiny they may face are no doubt stronger than ever.

Hopefully that is a short-term situation.

Two, the allegations against Ghomeshi – the former CBC personality was acquitted last week of one count of choking to overcome resistance and four counts of sexual assault – sparked numerous conversations nationwide about sexual assault and consent.

Hopefully those conversations lead to a better understanding of sexual assault and eventually inspire more victims to come forward, potentially saving others from the same fate.

Women and girls are the victim of abuse – sexual and otherwise – and harassment every day in Cambridge, just as they are elsewhere in Ontario and throughout the world.

According to figures recently provided by the provincial government, one-in-three women is sexually assaulted at some point during her life. The same goes for one-in-six men.

There were 511 acts of sexual violence reported to Waterloo Regional Police last year alone, though we all know these assaults are under-reported.

This is unacceptable and we must all stand up against it.

Standing up against abuse

Opinion Mar 28, 2016 Cambridge Times

No matter how you feel about the outcome of the Jian Ghomeshi sexual assault trial, two things are certain.

One, sexual assault victims will be less likely to come forward and present a complaint. Fears of the scrutiny they may face are no doubt stronger than ever.

Hopefully that is a short-term situation.

Two, the allegations against Ghomeshi – the former CBC personality was acquitted last week of one count of choking to overcome resistance and four counts of sexual assault – sparked numerous conversations nationwide about sexual assault and consent.

Hopefully those conversations lead to a better understanding of sexual assault and eventually inspire more victims to come forward, potentially saving others from the same fate.

Women and girls are the victim of abuse – sexual and otherwise – and harassment every day in Cambridge, just as they are elsewhere in Ontario and throughout the world.

According to figures recently provided by the provincial government, one-in-three women is sexually assaulted at some point during her life. The same goes for one-in-six men.

There were 511 acts of sexual violence reported to Waterloo Regional Police last year alone, though we all know these assaults are under-reported.

This is unacceptable and we must all stand up against it.