Development taking over Waterdown’s beauty

Opinion Mar 28, 2016 Flamborough Review

Has anyone else noticed the horrendous pillage of all the beautiful trees on every inch of Waterdown soil? The very things that gave Waterdown its small town charm – the corn fields, the small hobby farms, the trails, the old buildings on the main street and the numerous old trees all over town are being torn down in the name of growth. The housing market is booming – but at what expense?

In mid-March every year Mountain Brow, which runs off of Waterdown Road, closes to traffic in order to allow the Jefferson salamander to migrate to its spawning area. According to the spin the media has put on it, “These little salamanders are imperative to the ecosystem.” I may have found some truth in that had they not spent months on end tearing up acres and acres of land to make room for thousands of new homes in the area.

I guess saving the land where local herds of deer have roamed for hundreds of years wasn’t as important. The land I am speaking of is adjacent to the Bruce Trail.

When do we stop? When is Waterdown big enough? When do we stand up and say, “Please stop building?” Recently, as I drove along Dundas Street, my eyes filled with tears as I saw five deer scrounging for something to eat. It won’t be long before we are sharing our small backyards with numerous critters such as coyotes, fox, deer, etc.

When I walk my dog, I run into packs of coyotes. Although there hasn’t been an incident yet, I am sure that a little toy breed of dog will make a nice light snack. I live just of off of Mill Street.

Let’s stand up for our little town and keep the trees and the beautiful green space for generations to come.

K. Henderson, Waterdown

Development taking over Waterdown’s beauty

Opinion Mar 28, 2016 Flamborough Review

Has anyone else noticed the horrendous pillage of all the beautiful trees on every inch of Waterdown soil? The very things that gave Waterdown its small town charm – the corn fields, the small hobby farms, the trails, the old buildings on the main street and the numerous old trees all over town are being torn down in the name of growth. The housing market is booming – but at what expense?

In mid-March every year Mountain Brow, which runs off of Waterdown Road, closes to traffic in order to allow the Jefferson salamander to migrate to its spawning area. According to the spin the media has put on it, “These little salamanders are imperative to the ecosystem.” I may have found some truth in that had they not spent months on end tearing up acres and acres of land to make room for thousands of new homes in the area.

I guess saving the land where local herds of deer have roamed for hundreds of years wasn’t as important. The land I am speaking of is adjacent to the Bruce Trail.

When do we stop? When is Waterdown big enough? When do we stand up and say, “Please stop building?” Recently, as I drove along Dundas Street, my eyes filled with tears as I saw five deer scrounging for something to eat. It won’t be long before we are sharing our small backyards with numerous critters such as coyotes, fox, deer, etc.

When I walk my dog, I run into packs of coyotes. Although there hasn’t been an incident yet, I am sure that a little toy breed of dog will make a nice light snack. I live just of off of Mill Street.

Let’s stand up for our little town and keep the trees and the beautiful green space for generations to come.

K. Henderson, Waterdown

Development taking over Waterdown’s beauty

Opinion Mar 28, 2016 Flamborough Review

Has anyone else noticed the horrendous pillage of all the beautiful trees on every inch of Waterdown soil? The very things that gave Waterdown its small town charm – the corn fields, the small hobby farms, the trails, the old buildings on the main street and the numerous old trees all over town are being torn down in the name of growth. The housing market is booming – but at what expense?

In mid-March every year Mountain Brow, which runs off of Waterdown Road, closes to traffic in order to allow the Jefferson salamander to migrate to its spawning area. According to the spin the media has put on it, “These little salamanders are imperative to the ecosystem.” I may have found some truth in that had they not spent months on end tearing up acres and acres of land to make room for thousands of new homes in the area.

I guess saving the land where local herds of deer have roamed for hundreds of years wasn’t as important. The land I am speaking of is adjacent to the Bruce Trail.

When do we stop? When is Waterdown big enough? When do we stand up and say, “Please stop building?” Recently, as I drove along Dundas Street, my eyes filled with tears as I saw five deer scrounging for something to eat. It won’t be long before we are sharing our small backyards with numerous critters such as coyotes, fox, deer, etc.

When I walk my dog, I run into packs of coyotes. Although there hasn’t been an incident yet, I am sure that a little toy breed of dog will make a nice light snack. I live just of off of Mill Street.

Let’s stand up for our little town and keep the trees and the beautiful green space for generations to come.

K. Henderson, Waterdown