FAITH MATTERS: Why just twice a year?

Opinion Mar 30, 2016 by Rev. Ted Vance, Millgrove and Troy United Churches Flamborough Review

Some people may not like this article, and there are plenty of wonderful people who don’t attend church, but I am curious about something.

On Easter morning, churches were fuller than usual, as family members accompanied relatives and people who attend twice per year made the very good decision to come. Their attendance was most appreciated.

Whether Easter Sunday or Christmas Eve, as people exit they often sincerely comment on how much they enjoyed the service. My question is: if the time spent did your heart, or soul, or brain some good, why limit these benefits to just two weeks in a year?

Christmas Eve and Easter have warm feelings attached to them outside of the church experience. It could be memories of younger days, or family tradition that enhances the experience, however, I estimate that every Sunday we deliver at least 75-80 per cent of those good feelings that the two major holidays generate. Wouldn’t that justify an hour or two on a Sunday morning?

I love it when someone says, “I feel like that sermon was written just for me.” If one or two people receive the help, encouragement or clarity they need, then mission accomplished.

However, you never know when the word of God will really speak to you, so more frequent attendance would help increase the likelihood.

In times of tragedy or crisis, faith can be your most valuable asset, but in the same way that a professional sports team needs to practise to play their best in the game, a strong faith needs to be built gradually so it is in place when needed.

The world has changed greatly from when most folks attended every Sunday. People are so stretched now that they need Sunday to rest or get shopping or other tasks accomplished. But it is also the stress of the everyday world that makes time spent in church so valuable. When you can clear your mind, thank the Lord for all the blessings you’ve received and focus to hear God’s nudgings for your life.

So if you’re a CEO (Christmas & Easter Only), why not try attending once per month for a spiritual tune-up? If you’re a monthly attendee now, perhaps bi-weekly will increase the probability of hearing the message you need to hear. It’s worth a try.

FAITH MATTERS: Why just twice a year?

Opinion Mar 30, 2016 by Rev. Ted Vance, Millgrove and Troy United Churches Flamborough Review

Some people may not like this article, and there are plenty of wonderful people who don’t attend church, but I am curious about something.

On Easter morning, churches were fuller than usual, as family members accompanied relatives and people who attend twice per year made the very good decision to come. Their attendance was most appreciated.

Whether Easter Sunday or Christmas Eve, as people exit they often sincerely comment on how much they enjoyed the service. My question is: if the time spent did your heart, or soul, or brain some good, why limit these benefits to just two weeks in a year?

Christmas Eve and Easter have warm feelings attached to them outside of the church experience. It could be memories of younger days, or family tradition that enhances the experience, however, I estimate that every Sunday we deliver at least 75-80 per cent of those good feelings that the two major holidays generate. Wouldn’t that justify an hour or two on a Sunday morning?

I love it when someone says, “I feel like that sermon was written just for me.” If one or two people receive the help, encouragement or clarity they need, then mission accomplished.

However, you never know when the word of God will really speak to you, so more frequent attendance would help increase the likelihood.

In times of tragedy or crisis, faith can be your most valuable asset, but in the same way that a professional sports team needs to practise to play their best in the game, a strong faith needs to be built gradually so it is in place when needed.

The world has changed greatly from when most folks attended every Sunday. People are so stretched now that they need Sunday to rest or get shopping or other tasks accomplished. But it is also the stress of the everyday world that makes time spent in church so valuable. When you can clear your mind, thank the Lord for all the blessings you’ve received and focus to hear God’s nudgings for your life.

So if you’re a CEO (Christmas & Easter Only), why not try attending once per month for a spiritual tune-up? If you’re a monthly attendee now, perhaps bi-weekly will increase the probability of hearing the message you need to hear. It’s worth a try.

FAITH MATTERS: Why just twice a year?

Opinion Mar 30, 2016 by Rev. Ted Vance, Millgrove and Troy United Churches Flamborough Review

Some people may not like this article, and there are plenty of wonderful people who don’t attend church, but I am curious about something.

On Easter morning, churches were fuller than usual, as family members accompanied relatives and people who attend twice per year made the very good decision to come. Their attendance was most appreciated.

Whether Easter Sunday or Christmas Eve, as people exit they often sincerely comment on how much they enjoyed the service. My question is: if the time spent did your heart, or soul, or brain some good, why limit these benefits to just two weeks in a year?

Christmas Eve and Easter have warm feelings attached to them outside of the church experience. It could be memories of younger days, or family tradition that enhances the experience, however, I estimate that every Sunday we deliver at least 75-80 per cent of those good feelings that the two major holidays generate. Wouldn’t that justify an hour or two on a Sunday morning?

I love it when someone says, “I feel like that sermon was written just for me.” If one or two people receive the help, encouragement or clarity they need, then mission accomplished.

However, you never know when the word of God will really speak to you, so more frequent attendance would help increase the likelihood.

In times of tragedy or crisis, faith can be your most valuable asset, but in the same way that a professional sports team needs to practise to play their best in the game, a strong faith needs to be built gradually so it is in place when needed.

The world has changed greatly from when most folks attended every Sunday. People are so stretched now that they need Sunday to rest or get shopping or other tasks accomplished. But it is also the stress of the everyday world that makes time spent in church so valuable. When you can clear your mind, thank the Lord for all the blessings you’ve received and focus to hear God’s nudgings for your life.

So if you’re a CEO (Christmas & Easter Only), why not try attending once per month for a spiritual tune-up? If you’re a monthly attendee now, perhaps bi-weekly will increase the probability of hearing the message you need to hear. It’s worth a try.