FROM THE VAULT: Methodist services

Opinion Mar 30, 2016 by Sylvia Wray, Flamborough Archives Flamborough Review

Several notable Methodist leaders allowed their homes to become places of worship, including Peter Bowman in Ancaster and Richard Springer in Hamilton.

This resulted in the creation of small chapels in the townships surrounding the Head-of-the-Lake.

In Millgrove, members of the Cummins family hosted meetings. The arrival of John Eaton in East Flamborough in 1826 resulted in the establishment of a Meeting House in his home and, in 1839, the construction of the “Chapel at the Twelve” in the settlement that would become Carlisle. Under the direction of Ebenezer Culver Griffin, the Wesleyan Methodists of Waterdown constructed a wooden chapel on Mill Street, while Methodist Episcopal adherents continued to meet in a building on Vinegar Hill.

The rapid growth of Methodism was at times accompanied by conflict and rivalry between the two main sects. At Rock Chapel, it took the form of a battle for the physical ownership of the building that had been built in 1822. In Ancaster, the Wesleyans were successful in taking ownership of the Bowman Chapel, while their rivals inaugurated services in the same neighbourhood in their newly-erected White Brick Church.

Gradually the dissension and bitterness between the various sects declined. When the Clergy Reserves were finally abandoned and their proceeds devoted to public education in 1854, the Methodist Church seemed to finally find some peace, culminating in the 1870s when they reunited as one Methodist Church. Merged congregations agreed to share one building and find new uses for others.

Nowhere was this reduction in churches more apparent than in East Flamborough Township. In Carlisle, the Methodist New Connexion congregation, unable to compete with the larger Wesleyan Methodist Church, advertised the building on the 9th Concession for sale in the Milton Champion newspaper. Eventually it was sold to the small Anglican community in the area.

In Waterdown, the Methodist Union resulted in the village’s three churches becoming one and agreeing to use the Wesleyan Church on Mill Street, while the New Connexion Church on Dundas Street served as the Sunday School for a number of years and the Methodist Episcopal Chapel, which had closed its doors several years earlier, was sold to the Waterdown Cemetery Board that used it as a storage shed.

FROM THE VAULT: Methodist services

Opinion Mar 30, 2016 by Sylvia Wray, Flamborough Archives Flamborough Review

Several notable Methodist leaders allowed their homes to become places of worship, including Peter Bowman in Ancaster and Richard Springer in Hamilton.

This resulted in the creation of small chapels in the townships surrounding the Head-of-the-Lake.

In Millgrove, members of the Cummins family hosted meetings. The arrival of John Eaton in East Flamborough in 1826 resulted in the establishment of a Meeting House in his home and, in 1839, the construction of the “Chapel at the Twelve” in the settlement that would become Carlisle. Under the direction of Ebenezer Culver Griffin, the Wesleyan Methodists of Waterdown constructed a wooden chapel on Mill Street, while Methodist Episcopal adherents continued to meet in a building on Vinegar Hill.

The rapid growth of Methodism was at times accompanied by conflict and rivalry between the two main sects. At Rock Chapel, it took the form of a battle for the physical ownership of the building that had been built in 1822. In Ancaster, the Wesleyans were successful in taking ownership of the Bowman Chapel, while their rivals inaugurated services in the same neighbourhood in their newly-erected White Brick Church.

Gradually the dissension and bitterness between the various sects declined. When the Clergy Reserves were finally abandoned and their proceeds devoted to public education in 1854, the Methodist Church seemed to finally find some peace, culminating in the 1870s when they reunited as one Methodist Church. Merged congregations agreed to share one building and find new uses for others.

Nowhere was this reduction in churches more apparent than in East Flamborough Township. In Carlisle, the Methodist New Connexion congregation, unable to compete with the larger Wesleyan Methodist Church, advertised the building on the 9th Concession for sale in the Milton Champion newspaper. Eventually it was sold to the small Anglican community in the area.

In Waterdown, the Methodist Union resulted in the village’s three churches becoming one and agreeing to use the Wesleyan Church on Mill Street, while the New Connexion Church on Dundas Street served as the Sunday School for a number of years and the Methodist Episcopal Chapel, which had closed its doors several years earlier, was sold to the Waterdown Cemetery Board that used it as a storage shed.

FROM THE VAULT: Methodist services

Opinion Mar 30, 2016 by Sylvia Wray, Flamborough Archives Flamborough Review

Several notable Methodist leaders allowed their homes to become places of worship, including Peter Bowman in Ancaster and Richard Springer in Hamilton.

This resulted in the creation of small chapels in the townships surrounding the Head-of-the-Lake.

In Millgrove, members of the Cummins family hosted meetings. The arrival of John Eaton in East Flamborough in 1826 resulted in the establishment of a Meeting House in his home and, in 1839, the construction of the “Chapel at the Twelve” in the settlement that would become Carlisle. Under the direction of Ebenezer Culver Griffin, the Wesleyan Methodists of Waterdown constructed a wooden chapel on Mill Street, while Methodist Episcopal adherents continued to meet in a building on Vinegar Hill.

The rapid growth of Methodism was at times accompanied by conflict and rivalry between the two main sects. At Rock Chapel, it took the form of a battle for the physical ownership of the building that had been built in 1822. In Ancaster, the Wesleyans were successful in taking ownership of the Bowman Chapel, while their rivals inaugurated services in the same neighbourhood in their newly-erected White Brick Church.

Gradually the dissension and bitterness between the various sects declined. When the Clergy Reserves were finally abandoned and their proceeds devoted to public education in 1854, the Methodist Church seemed to finally find some peace, culminating in the 1870s when they reunited as one Methodist Church. Merged congregations agreed to share one building and find new uses for others.

Nowhere was this reduction in churches more apparent than in East Flamborough Township. In Carlisle, the Methodist New Connexion congregation, unable to compete with the larger Wesleyan Methodist Church, advertised the building on the 9th Concession for sale in the Milton Champion newspaper. Eventually it was sold to the small Anglican community in the area.

In Waterdown, the Methodist Union resulted in the village’s three churches becoming one and agreeing to use the Wesleyan Church on Mill Street, while the New Connexion Church on Dundas Street served as the Sunday School for a number of years and the Methodist Episcopal Chapel, which had closed its doors several years earlier, was sold to the Waterdown Cemetery Board that used it as a storage shed.