Darling borrows from Roman Polanski with creepy results: review

Opinion Mar 31, 2016 by Linda Barnard OurWindsor.Ca

From her lace-collared baby doll dress to doe-eyed Jane Birkin-meets-Audrey Hepburn looks, actress Lauren Ashley Carter seems to have stepped out of a 40-year-old Roman Polanski thriller as the title character in black-and-white psychological horror, Darling.

In a way, she has. Writer-director Mickey Keating borrows heavily from Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby in ’60s esthetic (misty, moody Manhattan, high-ceilinged rooms and an upside-down crucifix) and Repulsion in theme. Plus a little bit of Alfred Hitchcock goes on in a white-tiled bathroom.

Thanks to excellent work from Carter, creepy and big-eyed innocent as required and strong throughout the 75-minute film, Darling holds its own as a satisfyingly deliberate-moving thriller.

Sean Young makes a brief appearance as a mink-clad matron, owner of a fancy Central Park facing townhouse which has a legendary reputation as a site of past sins.

Carter, called “Darling” by her employer who can’t be bothered to learn her name, is the new caretaker. She’s left alone in the mansion with instructions to stay out of the locked room at the end of the hall and to not to lose any sleep over the fate of her predecessor.

Whether it’s the house at work, or the girl’s percolating madness sparked by torment about a past assault (only hinted at here), hallucinations signal a slide into altered reality.

When she brings a man (Brian Morvant) home from a nearby bar, shrilly ringing phones, whispered voices and the monotone of a ticking clock help build dread. But Keating’s fondness for strobe-lights and rapidly flashing images will drive anyone sensitive to these things batty.

Toronto Star

Darling borrows from Roman Polanski with creepy results: review

Darling writer-director Mickey Keating borrows heavily from Roman Polanski for his New York-set horror, but thanks to a great performance from Lauren Ashley Carter, it stands on its own

Opinion Mar 31, 2016 by Linda Barnard OurWindsor.Ca

From her lace-collared baby doll dress to doe-eyed Jane Birkin-meets-Audrey Hepburn looks, actress Lauren Ashley Carter seems to have stepped out of a 40-year-old Roman Polanski thriller as the title character in black-and-white psychological horror, Darling.

In a way, she has. Writer-director Mickey Keating borrows heavily from Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby in ’60s esthetic (misty, moody Manhattan, high-ceilinged rooms and an upside-down crucifix) and Repulsion in theme. Plus a little bit of Alfred Hitchcock goes on in a white-tiled bathroom.

Thanks to excellent work from Carter, creepy and big-eyed innocent as required and strong throughout the 75-minute film, Darling holds its own as a satisfyingly deliberate-moving thriller.

Sean Young makes a brief appearance as a mink-clad matron, owner of a fancy Central Park facing townhouse which has a legendary reputation as a site of past sins.

Carter, called “Darling” by her employer who can’t be bothered to learn her name, is the new caretaker. She’s left alone in the mansion with instructions to stay out of the locked room at the end of the hall and to not to lose any sleep over the fate of her predecessor.

Whether it’s the house at work, or the girl’s percolating madness sparked by torment about a past assault (only hinted at here), hallucinations signal a slide into altered reality.

When she brings a man (Brian Morvant) home from a nearby bar, shrilly ringing phones, whispered voices and the monotone of a ticking clock help build dread. But Keating’s fondness for strobe-lights and rapidly flashing images will drive anyone sensitive to these things batty.

Toronto Star

Darling borrows from Roman Polanski with creepy results: review

Darling writer-director Mickey Keating borrows heavily from Roman Polanski for his New York-set horror, but thanks to a great performance from Lauren Ashley Carter, it stands on its own

Opinion Mar 31, 2016 by Linda Barnard OurWindsor.Ca

From her lace-collared baby doll dress to doe-eyed Jane Birkin-meets-Audrey Hepburn looks, actress Lauren Ashley Carter seems to have stepped out of a 40-year-old Roman Polanski thriller as the title character in black-and-white psychological horror, Darling.

In a way, she has. Writer-director Mickey Keating borrows heavily from Polanski’s Rosemary’s Baby in ’60s esthetic (misty, moody Manhattan, high-ceilinged rooms and an upside-down crucifix) and Repulsion in theme. Plus a little bit of Alfred Hitchcock goes on in a white-tiled bathroom.

Thanks to excellent work from Carter, creepy and big-eyed innocent as required and strong throughout the 75-minute film, Darling holds its own as a satisfyingly deliberate-moving thriller.

Sean Young makes a brief appearance as a mink-clad matron, owner of a fancy Central Park facing townhouse which has a legendary reputation as a site of past sins.

Carter, called “Darling” by her employer who can’t be bothered to learn her name, is the new caretaker. She’s left alone in the mansion with instructions to stay out of the locked room at the end of the hall and to not to lose any sleep over the fate of her predecessor.

Whether it’s the house at work, or the girl’s percolating madness sparked by torment about a past assault (only hinted at here), hallucinations signal a slide into altered reality.

When she brings a man (Brian Morvant) home from a nearby bar, shrilly ringing phones, whispered voices and the monotone of a ticking clock help build dread. But Keating’s fondness for strobe-lights and rapidly flashing images will drive anyone sensitive to these things batty.

Toronto Star