Solving the overcrowding problem at Websters and Tews Falls

Opinion Apr 07, 2016 Flamborough Review

Dear Editor,

This email was sent to Councillor Pasuta regarding the problems at Websters and Tews Falls.

Because so many people now want to view the falls – as a result of intense advertising by the city to attract visitors without thinking of the ramifications – there is now overcrowding of the sites, which far exceeds the areas’ capacity to handle the garbage, sanitation, noise, impact on neighbours and wildlife and plants.

The solution: timed viewing tickets, for one hour only , which is plenty of time to see the falls, take pictures etc. This is similar to what art galleries do when they have a special exhibit and know the gallery will be jammed.

The Hamilton Conservation Authority could issue tickets online or by phone, further reducing the traffic. There could be a year of calendar dates with some days closed for events such as school visits or bus groups.

A student could be hired to man the gate and another to supervise unauthorized admission. Only those with the appropriate timed ticket can enter and park. They would be required to leave their keys at the gate.

A large sign posted at the gate and on both roadways near the falls would warn visitors that any person returning late must pay a $200 fine before their car keys would be returned.

I think this would really work; It works for museums, so why not the falls?

It certainly would eliminate hundreds of cars coming all summer trying to get in. As well, it would generate income for the conservation authority for upkeep of the area.

The city and conservation authority could post the information on Facebook, and where they initially advertised to get all these people in the first place, and we will no longer have a problem.

Marilyn Brown

Waterdown

Solving the overcrowding problem at Websters and Tews Falls

Opinion Apr 07, 2016 Flamborough Review

Dear Editor,

This email was sent to Councillor Pasuta regarding the problems at Websters and Tews Falls.

Because so many people now want to view the falls – as a result of intense advertising by the city to attract visitors without thinking of the ramifications – there is now overcrowding of the sites, which far exceeds the areas’ capacity to handle the garbage, sanitation, noise, impact on neighbours and wildlife and plants.

The solution: timed viewing tickets, for one hour only , which is plenty of time to see the falls, take pictures etc. This is similar to what art galleries do when they have a special exhibit and know the gallery will be jammed.

The Hamilton Conservation Authority could issue tickets online or by phone, further reducing the traffic. There could be a year of calendar dates with some days closed for events such as school visits or bus groups.

A student could be hired to man the gate and another to supervise unauthorized admission. Only those with the appropriate timed ticket can enter and park. They would be required to leave their keys at the gate.

A large sign posted at the gate and on both roadways near the falls would warn visitors that any person returning late must pay a $200 fine before their car keys would be returned.

I think this would really work; It works for museums, so why not the falls?

It certainly would eliminate hundreds of cars coming all summer trying to get in. As well, it would generate income for the conservation authority for upkeep of the area.

The city and conservation authority could post the information on Facebook, and where they initially advertised to get all these people in the first place, and we will no longer have a problem.

Marilyn Brown

Waterdown

Solving the overcrowding problem at Websters and Tews Falls

Opinion Apr 07, 2016 Flamborough Review

Dear Editor,

This email was sent to Councillor Pasuta regarding the problems at Websters and Tews Falls.

Because so many people now want to view the falls – as a result of intense advertising by the city to attract visitors without thinking of the ramifications – there is now overcrowding of the sites, which far exceeds the areas’ capacity to handle the garbage, sanitation, noise, impact on neighbours and wildlife and plants.

The solution: timed viewing tickets, for one hour only , which is plenty of time to see the falls, take pictures etc. This is similar to what art galleries do when they have a special exhibit and know the gallery will be jammed.

The Hamilton Conservation Authority could issue tickets online or by phone, further reducing the traffic. There could be a year of calendar dates with some days closed for events such as school visits or bus groups.

A student could be hired to man the gate and another to supervise unauthorized admission. Only those with the appropriate timed ticket can enter and park. They would be required to leave their keys at the gate.

A large sign posted at the gate and on both roadways near the falls would warn visitors that any person returning late must pay a $200 fine before their car keys would be returned.

I think this would really work; It works for museums, so why not the falls?

It certainly would eliminate hundreds of cars coming all summer trying to get in. As well, it would generate income for the conservation authority for upkeep of the area.

The city and conservation authority could post the information on Facebook, and where they initially advertised to get all these people in the first place, and we will no longer have a problem.

Marilyn Brown

Waterdown