Moving past Mulcair

Opinion Apr 11, 2016 Cambridge Times

In the wake of last fall’s poor showing at the polls, the federal New Democratic Party is on the hunt for a new leader.

Party delegates voted last weekend to oust Tom Mulcair from the top job and find someone they think could lead resurgence in public support.

During the same convention, party members agreed to make a left turn in policy, moving away from the centralist approach that has crept forward during recent years.

Will these decisions see them move a person into 24 Sussex Dr. in Ottawa (the prime minister’s official residence)? That would be incredibly difficult to do, especially given the party’s recent tumble from Official Opposition status and the resurgence of Liberal support.

Yet, a new leader and more leftist leanings may put the NDP in position to accomplish what it is, perhaps, best suited to do – act as the government’s conscience.

We are filled with questions for which there are no real answers at this time: Who will step up to lead the NDP? How will he or she influence the party’s approach to important issues? How will having two new party leaders – the Conservative Party is also in need of a new head – on Parliament Hill impact Canadian politics?

With nearly four years before the next federal election, there’s plenty of time to see what comes of it all.

Moving past Mulcair

Opinion Apr 11, 2016 Cambridge Times

In the wake of last fall’s poor showing at the polls, the federal New Democratic Party is on the hunt for a new leader.

Party delegates voted last weekend to oust Tom Mulcair from the top job and find someone they think could lead resurgence in public support.

During the same convention, party members agreed to make a left turn in policy, moving away from the centralist approach that has crept forward during recent years.

Will these decisions see them move a person into 24 Sussex Dr. in Ottawa (the prime minister’s official residence)? That would be incredibly difficult to do, especially given the party’s recent tumble from Official Opposition status and the resurgence of Liberal support.

Yet, a new leader and more leftist leanings may put the NDP in position to accomplish what it is, perhaps, best suited to do – act as the government’s conscience.

We are filled with questions for which there are no real answers at this time: Who will step up to lead the NDP? How will he or she influence the party’s approach to important issues? How will having two new party leaders – the Conservative Party is also in need of a new head – on Parliament Hill impact Canadian politics?

With nearly four years before the next federal election, there’s plenty of time to see what comes of it all.

Moving past Mulcair

Opinion Apr 11, 2016 Cambridge Times

In the wake of last fall’s poor showing at the polls, the federal New Democratic Party is on the hunt for a new leader.

Party delegates voted last weekend to oust Tom Mulcair from the top job and find someone they think could lead resurgence in public support.

During the same convention, party members agreed to make a left turn in policy, moving away from the centralist approach that has crept forward during recent years.

Will these decisions see them move a person into 24 Sussex Dr. in Ottawa (the prime minister’s official residence)? That would be incredibly difficult to do, especially given the party’s recent tumble from Official Opposition status and the resurgence of Liberal support.

Yet, a new leader and more leftist leanings may put the NDP in position to accomplish what it is, perhaps, best suited to do – act as the government’s conscience.

We are filled with questions for which there are no real answers at this time: Who will step up to lead the NDP? How will he or she influence the party’s approach to important issues? How will having two new party leaders – the Conservative Party is also in need of a new head – on Parliament Hill impact Canadian politics?

With nearly four years before the next federal election, there’s plenty of time to see what comes of it all.