Bland NDP leader had to go

Opinion Apr 13, 2016 Mississauga News

  • Thomas Mulcair lacked a political leader’s greatest gift: an intuitive ability to read the public mood.

Going into last year’s federal election, voters were weary of 10 years of Stephen Harper and his floundering economic policies.

They didn’t like his disengagement from the eco-initiatives sweeping the world either, or his icy manner.

They wanted change – something bold, someone at the leadership helm infused with enthusiasm.

Mulcair wasn’t that person. He positioned his party to look a lot like the reactionary Harper, including a call for more fiscal belt-tightening.

All the touchstones of NDP policy – green energy, enriched social programs, even deficit financing – were either ignored or buffed to a soft edge by the stodgy Mulcair.

Into this ennui entered a leader on a white steed with a killer last name: Trudeau.

Justin Trudeau was the anti-Harper/Mulcair: a telegenic, engaged and likeable personality who was backed by a party platform that urged a bold approach to economic renewal.

Mulcair was applying the brakes just as public sentiment was eager for speedy change.

Ironically, Mulcair was ousted from his job as leader at a gathering in Alberta, the province now ruled by the NDP.

Its leader, Rachel Notley, was the benefactor of some much-needed change in the oil patch.  

Getting outflanked by the Liberals’ progressive agenda ­still irks the NDP hierarchy. It seemed like the party was poised for a potential power grab in 2015.

Mulcair’s exit is another cautionary tale about leaders becoming too cautionary during an election cycle. It smacks of someone with bad instincts.

The glib David Peterson took the voting public for granted in 1990s Ontario and was bludgeoned in the polls by Bob Rae and his merry band of socialists.

The problem for many leaders is in knowing the proper time to act, or react.

Trudeau’s bold approach carried the day; Mulcair’s caution was horribly timed.

Now the NDP seems split-apart by the Trudeau sweep.

Notley is pushing for a federal platform that includes the building of new pipelines, while others push the Leap Manifesto, asking Canada to wean itself off fossil fuels and any new energy projects.

Is the NDP at war with itself?  It’s not hard to see why. It left its principles at the start line in the last federal election. It’s now trying to play catch-up with Trudeau’s up-tempo style of leadership.

The NDP must return to its roots and elect a leader who can boldly propel them into the future.

He or she must have an instinctive feel for what really works with the voters.

Anything would be an improvement over the overly cautious Mulcair.

 

 

Bland NDP leader had to go

Opinion Apr 13, 2016 Mississauga News

  • Thomas Mulcair lacked a political leader’s greatest gift: an intuitive ability to read the public mood.

Going into last year’s federal election, voters were weary of 10 years of Stephen Harper and his floundering economic policies.

They didn’t like his disengagement from the eco-initiatives sweeping the world either, or his icy manner.

They wanted change – something bold, someone at the leadership helm infused with enthusiasm.

Mulcair wasn’t that person. He positioned his party to look a lot like the reactionary Harper, including a call for more fiscal belt-tightening.

All the touchstones of NDP policy – green energy, enriched social programs, even deficit financing – were either ignored or buffed to a soft edge by the stodgy Mulcair.

Into this ennui entered a leader on a white steed with a killer last name: Trudeau.

Justin Trudeau was the anti-Harper/Mulcair: a telegenic, engaged and likeable personality who was backed by a party platform that urged a bold approach to economic renewal.

Mulcair was applying the brakes just as public sentiment was eager for speedy change.

Ironically, Mulcair was ousted from his job as leader at a gathering in Alberta, the province now ruled by the NDP.

Its leader, Rachel Notley, was the benefactor of some much-needed change in the oil patch.  

Getting outflanked by the Liberals’ progressive agenda ­still irks the NDP hierarchy. It seemed like the party was poised for a potential power grab in 2015.

Mulcair’s exit is another cautionary tale about leaders becoming too cautionary during an election cycle. It smacks of someone with bad instincts.

The glib David Peterson took the voting public for granted in 1990s Ontario and was bludgeoned in the polls by Bob Rae and his merry band of socialists.

The problem for many leaders is in knowing the proper time to act, or react.

Trudeau’s bold approach carried the day; Mulcair’s caution was horribly timed.

Now the NDP seems split-apart by the Trudeau sweep.

Notley is pushing for a federal platform that includes the building of new pipelines, while others push the Leap Manifesto, asking Canada to wean itself off fossil fuels and any new energy projects.

Is the NDP at war with itself?  It’s not hard to see why. It left its principles at the start line in the last federal election. It’s now trying to play catch-up with Trudeau’s up-tempo style of leadership.

The NDP must return to its roots and elect a leader who can boldly propel them into the future.

He or she must have an instinctive feel for what really works with the voters.

Anything would be an improvement over the overly cautious Mulcair.

 

 

Bland NDP leader had to go

Opinion Apr 13, 2016 Mississauga News

  • Thomas Mulcair lacked a political leader’s greatest gift: an intuitive ability to read the public mood.

Going into last year’s federal election, voters were weary of 10 years of Stephen Harper and his floundering economic policies.

They didn’t like his disengagement from the eco-initiatives sweeping the world either, or his icy manner.

They wanted change – something bold, someone at the leadership helm infused with enthusiasm.

Mulcair wasn’t that person. He positioned his party to look a lot like the reactionary Harper, including a call for more fiscal belt-tightening.

All the touchstones of NDP policy – green energy, enriched social programs, even deficit financing – were either ignored or buffed to a soft edge by the stodgy Mulcair.

Into this ennui entered a leader on a white steed with a killer last name: Trudeau.

Justin Trudeau was the anti-Harper/Mulcair: a telegenic, engaged and likeable personality who was backed by a party platform that urged a bold approach to economic renewal.

Mulcair was applying the brakes just as public sentiment was eager for speedy change.

Ironically, Mulcair was ousted from his job as leader at a gathering in Alberta, the province now ruled by the NDP.

Its leader, Rachel Notley, was the benefactor of some much-needed change in the oil patch.  

Getting outflanked by the Liberals’ progressive agenda ­still irks the NDP hierarchy. It seemed like the party was poised for a potential power grab in 2015.

Mulcair’s exit is another cautionary tale about leaders becoming too cautionary during an election cycle. It smacks of someone with bad instincts.

The glib David Peterson took the voting public for granted in 1990s Ontario and was bludgeoned in the polls by Bob Rae and his merry band of socialists.

The problem for many leaders is in knowing the proper time to act, or react.

Trudeau’s bold approach carried the day; Mulcair’s caution was horribly timed.

Now the NDP seems split-apart by the Trudeau sweep.

Notley is pushing for a federal platform that includes the building of new pipelines, while others push the Leap Manifesto, asking Canada to wean itself off fossil fuels and any new energy projects.

Is the NDP at war with itself?  It’s not hard to see why. It left its principles at the start line in the last federal election. It’s now trying to play catch-up with Trudeau’s up-tempo style of leadership.

The NDP must return to its roots and elect a leader who can boldly propel them into the future.

He or she must have an instinctive feel for what really works with the voters.

Anything would be an improvement over the overly cautious Mulcair.