FAITH MATTERS: No longer doubt

Opinion Apr 14, 2016 by Fr. Wayne Lobsinger, St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church Flamborough Review

The name of my parish is St. Thomas the Apostle. Sadly, St. Thomas is most remembered as “doubting Thomas.”

This is due to the fact that in the Gospels, twice he clearly doubts: once when the Lord said to the Apostles, “You know the way to the place where I am going,” Thomas responds, “Lord, we do not know where you are going. How can we know the way?” (Jn. 14:4-5); his more commonly known doubting occurs after the resurrection, when he refuses to believe without proof.

He demanded to see and touch the holes in the Lord’s hand and side in order to believe (Jn. 20:24-27).

Sometimes, we too find it difficult to believe and understand the words of Jesus.

Faith requires us to believe in that which we cannot prove (Heb. 11:1).

However, we desire proof to believe. So when Jesus asks us to believe and follow in faith, is it not strange that sometimes we find this difficult.

When Jesus says, “Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you,” (Mt. 5:44) is not our first response, “Really you want me to forgive them?”

When Jesus says, “The truth will make you free,” (Jn. 8:32) do we really understand the freedom that comes from not just telling but living the truth of who we are – the children of God our Father?

Following the words of Jesus, walking the path He set for us and living according to His example is never easy – and sometimes calls for great effort. It is easier to make great efforts when we fully understand, but as people of faith, sometimes we are required to make the effort even though we don’t understand, simply because that is what is asked of us.

St. Thomas the Apostle was asked to follow even though he didn’t know the way or where he was going.

But once he experienced the risen Lord, he responded with the beautiful words: “My Lord and my God” (Jn. 20:28). Once we commit to following the Lord, even though we don’t understand, we find joy and fulfillment simply in generously responding to His call.

In being not just hearers but doers of the word of God (Jas 1:22), we too, like St. Thomas, meet the risen Lord, are filled with His new life and are then able to bring our Lord and our God to those around us.

FAITH MATTERS: No longer doubt

Opinion Apr 14, 2016 by Fr. Wayne Lobsinger, St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church Flamborough Review

The name of my parish is St. Thomas the Apostle. Sadly, St. Thomas is most remembered as “doubting Thomas.”

This is due to the fact that in the Gospels, twice he clearly doubts: once when the Lord said to the Apostles, “You know the way to the place where I am going,” Thomas responds, “Lord, we do not know where you are going. How can we know the way?” (Jn. 14:4-5); his more commonly known doubting occurs after the resurrection, when he refuses to believe without proof.

He demanded to see and touch the holes in the Lord’s hand and side in order to believe (Jn. 20:24-27).

Sometimes, we too find it difficult to believe and understand the words of Jesus.

Faith requires us to believe in that which we cannot prove (Heb. 11:1).

However, we desire proof to believe. So when Jesus asks us to believe and follow in faith, is it not strange that sometimes we find this difficult.

When Jesus says, “Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you,” (Mt. 5:44) is not our first response, “Really you want me to forgive them?”

When Jesus says, “The truth will make you free,” (Jn. 8:32) do we really understand the freedom that comes from not just telling but living the truth of who we are – the children of God our Father?

Following the words of Jesus, walking the path He set for us and living according to His example is never easy – and sometimes calls for great effort. It is easier to make great efforts when we fully understand, but as people of faith, sometimes we are required to make the effort even though we don’t understand, simply because that is what is asked of us.

St. Thomas the Apostle was asked to follow even though he didn’t know the way or where he was going.

But once he experienced the risen Lord, he responded with the beautiful words: “My Lord and my God” (Jn. 20:28). Once we commit to following the Lord, even though we don’t understand, we find joy and fulfillment simply in generously responding to His call.

In being not just hearers but doers of the word of God (Jas 1:22), we too, like St. Thomas, meet the risen Lord, are filled with His new life and are then able to bring our Lord and our God to those around us.

FAITH MATTERS: No longer doubt

Opinion Apr 14, 2016 by Fr. Wayne Lobsinger, St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic Church Flamborough Review

The name of my parish is St. Thomas the Apostle. Sadly, St. Thomas is most remembered as “doubting Thomas.”

This is due to the fact that in the Gospels, twice he clearly doubts: once when the Lord said to the Apostles, “You know the way to the place where I am going,” Thomas responds, “Lord, we do not know where you are going. How can we know the way?” (Jn. 14:4-5); his more commonly known doubting occurs after the resurrection, when he refuses to believe without proof.

He demanded to see and touch the holes in the Lord’s hand and side in order to believe (Jn. 20:24-27).

Sometimes, we too find it difficult to believe and understand the words of Jesus.

Faith requires us to believe in that which we cannot prove (Heb. 11:1).

However, we desire proof to believe. So when Jesus asks us to believe and follow in faith, is it not strange that sometimes we find this difficult.

When Jesus says, “Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you,” (Mt. 5:44) is not our first response, “Really you want me to forgive them?”

When Jesus says, “The truth will make you free,” (Jn. 8:32) do we really understand the freedom that comes from not just telling but living the truth of who we are – the children of God our Father?

Following the words of Jesus, walking the path He set for us and living according to His example is never easy – and sometimes calls for great effort. It is easier to make great efforts when we fully understand, but as people of faith, sometimes we are required to make the effort even though we don’t understand, simply because that is what is asked of us.

St. Thomas the Apostle was asked to follow even though he didn’t know the way or where he was going.

But once he experienced the risen Lord, he responded with the beautiful words: “My Lord and my God” (Jn. 20:28). Once we commit to following the Lord, even though we don’t understand, we find joy and fulfillment simply in generously responding to His call.

In being not just hearers but doers of the word of God (Jas 1:22), we too, like St. Thomas, meet the risen Lord, are filled with His new life and are then able to bring our Lord and our God to those around us.