Humanist drama The Measure of a Man is essential viewing: review

Opinion Apr 15, 2016 by Peter Howell OurWindsor.Ca

France’s popular Vincent Lindon won Best Actor at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival for his outstanding performance as a laid-off blue collar worker struggling for income and dignity.

Stéphane Brizé’s humanist drama tallies the slow drip of dignity in a downsized world. Lindon is laid-off factory worker Thierry, who at age 51 has been sincerely but unsuccessfully seeking new work for more than a year, going to one soulless job interview and training session after another.

Thierry and his wife (Karine de Mirbeck) survive on subsistence benefits, a task made harder by the special needs of their teen son (Matthieu Schaller). But they know others are worse off. Empathy abounds; viewing is essential.

Toronto Star

Humanist drama The Measure of a Man is essential viewing: review

Opinion Apr 15, 2016 by Peter Howell OurWindsor.Ca

France’s popular Vincent Lindon won Best Actor at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival for his outstanding performance as a laid-off blue collar worker struggling for income and dignity.

Stéphane Brizé’s humanist drama tallies the slow drip of dignity in a downsized world. Lindon is laid-off factory worker Thierry, who at age 51 has been sincerely but unsuccessfully seeking new work for more than a year, going to one soulless job interview and training session after another.

Thierry and his wife (Karine de Mirbeck) survive on subsistence benefits, a task made harder by the special needs of their teen son (Matthieu Schaller). But they know others are worse off. Empathy abounds; viewing is essential.

Toronto Star

Humanist drama The Measure of a Man is essential viewing: review

Opinion Apr 15, 2016 by Peter Howell OurWindsor.Ca

France’s popular Vincent Lindon won Best Actor at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival for his outstanding performance as a laid-off blue collar worker struggling for income and dignity.

Stéphane Brizé’s humanist drama tallies the slow drip of dignity in a downsized world. Lindon is laid-off factory worker Thierry, who at age 51 has been sincerely but unsuccessfully seeking new work for more than a year, going to one soulless job interview and training session after another.

Thierry and his wife (Karine de Mirbeck) survive on subsistence benefits, a task made harder by the special needs of their teen son (Matthieu Schaller). But they know others are worse off. Empathy abounds; viewing is essential.

Toronto Star