New legislation to cut red tape and boost job creators

Opinion Nov 02, 2018 by MPP Donna Skelly, Flamborough-Glanbrook Flamborough Review

Last week I spoke in the legislature in support of Bill 47, Making Ontario Open for Business Act, which reduces the regulatory burden, cuts red tape and gets government out of the way of job creators.

This is an essential first step in making Ontario, once again, one of the best places in the world to invest and create jobs.

Because I serve as the parliamentary assistant to Minister Jim Wilson, one of the ministers spearheading this legislation, I was one of the first MPPs in the speaking order on this bill — which advances the No. 1 priority of our government.

In my remarks to the legislature, I brought forward input we’ve received from small business owners in Flamborough — amplified by many conversations with businesses and taxpayers over the past few months.

Bill 47 will, if passed, enable more employers to invest in business expansion and jobs as unnecessary regulations that are inefficient, inflexible and out of date are cut. All while maintaining standards to keep Ontarians safe and healthy.

The act also helps open up jobs in the skilled trades. This is a point we heard over and over as red tape reduction roundtables were held across the province, including with businesses located right here in Flamborough. The key changes are the reduction of the journeyman-to-apprenticeship ratios to one-to-one (from one-to-four) along with the winding down of the complex, job killing bureaucracy known as the College of Trades.

This legislation replaces the Liberals’ ideological minimum wage law with one that keeps the minimum age at $14 per hour until 2020, at which point it will rise with inflation.

It will also replace the Liberals’ disastrous personal emergency leave rules and instead ensure workers will be able to take up to three days for personal illness, two for bereavement and three for family responsibilities while maintaining leave provisions for victims of domestic or sexual violence.

Fundamental to us is the belief that anybody who is prepared to work hard deserves a shot at a better job. As I said in the legislature last week, I’ve been hearing small businesses use the word “hope” to describe the turnaround they feel in the province’s approach to opening up our economy.

With Bill 47 and beyond, let’s ensure that continues to ring true.

— Donna Skelly is the member of Provincial Parliament for Flamborough-Glanbrook and the parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade.

New legislation to cut red tape and boost job creators

Bill will enable employers to invest in expansion, says Skelly

Opinion Nov 02, 2018 by MPP Donna Skelly, Flamborough-Glanbrook Flamborough Review

Last week I spoke in the legislature in support of Bill 47, Making Ontario Open for Business Act, which reduces the regulatory burden, cuts red tape and gets government out of the way of job creators.

This is an essential first step in making Ontario, once again, one of the best places in the world to invest and create jobs.

Because I serve as the parliamentary assistant to Minister Jim Wilson, one of the ministers spearheading this legislation, I was one of the first MPPs in the speaking order on this bill — which advances the No. 1 priority of our government.

In my remarks to the legislature, I brought forward input we’ve received from small business owners in Flamborough — amplified by many conversations with businesses and taxpayers over the past few months.

Bill 47 will, if passed, enable more employers to invest in business expansion and jobs as unnecessary regulations that are inefficient, inflexible and out of date are cut. All while maintaining standards to keep Ontarians safe and healthy.

The act also helps open up jobs in the skilled trades. This is a point we heard over and over as red tape reduction roundtables were held across the province, including with businesses located right here in Flamborough. The key changes are the reduction of the journeyman-to-apprenticeship ratios to one-to-one (from one-to-four) along with the winding down of the complex, job killing bureaucracy known as the College of Trades.

This legislation replaces the Liberals’ ideological minimum wage law with one that keeps the minimum age at $14 per hour until 2020, at which point it will rise with inflation.

It will also replace the Liberals’ disastrous personal emergency leave rules and instead ensure workers will be able to take up to three days for personal illness, two for bereavement and three for family responsibilities while maintaining leave provisions for victims of domestic or sexual violence.

Fundamental to us is the belief that anybody who is prepared to work hard deserves a shot at a better job. As I said in the legislature last week, I’ve been hearing small businesses use the word “hope” to describe the turnaround they feel in the province’s approach to opening up our economy.

With Bill 47 and beyond, let’s ensure that continues to ring true.

— Donna Skelly is the member of Provincial Parliament for Flamborough-Glanbrook and the parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade.

New legislation to cut red tape and boost job creators

Bill will enable employers to invest in expansion, says Skelly

Opinion Nov 02, 2018 by MPP Donna Skelly, Flamborough-Glanbrook Flamborough Review

Last week I spoke in the legislature in support of Bill 47, Making Ontario Open for Business Act, which reduces the regulatory burden, cuts red tape and gets government out of the way of job creators.

This is an essential first step in making Ontario, once again, one of the best places in the world to invest and create jobs.

Because I serve as the parliamentary assistant to Minister Jim Wilson, one of the ministers spearheading this legislation, I was one of the first MPPs in the speaking order on this bill — which advances the No. 1 priority of our government.

In my remarks to the legislature, I brought forward input we’ve received from small business owners in Flamborough — amplified by many conversations with businesses and taxpayers over the past few months.

Bill 47 will, if passed, enable more employers to invest in business expansion and jobs as unnecessary regulations that are inefficient, inflexible and out of date are cut. All while maintaining standards to keep Ontarians safe and healthy.

The act also helps open up jobs in the skilled trades. This is a point we heard over and over as red tape reduction roundtables were held across the province, including with businesses located right here in Flamborough. The key changes are the reduction of the journeyman-to-apprenticeship ratios to one-to-one (from one-to-four) along with the winding down of the complex, job killing bureaucracy known as the College of Trades.

This legislation replaces the Liberals’ ideological minimum wage law with one that keeps the minimum age at $14 per hour until 2020, at which point it will rise with inflation.

It will also replace the Liberals’ disastrous personal emergency leave rules and instead ensure workers will be able to take up to three days for personal illness, two for bereavement and three for family responsibilities while maintaining leave provisions for victims of domestic or sexual violence.

Fundamental to us is the belief that anybody who is prepared to work hard deserves a shot at a better job. As I said in the legislature last week, I’ve been hearing small businesses use the word “hope” to describe the turnaround they feel in the province’s approach to opening up our economy.

With Bill 47 and beyond, let’s ensure that continues to ring true.

— Donna Skelly is the member of Provincial Parliament for Flamborough-Glanbrook and the parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade.