Waterdown trapshooter Elizabeth Longley reflects on World Cup season

Sports Oct 12, 2017 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Waterdown trapshooter Elizabeth Longley is the top ranked junior shooter on the International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF) women’s trap rankings.

The 19 year-old is currently ranked 41st in the world, and while she started the season really well, Longley said she had some difficulties as the season went on.

“The end of the season wasn’t what I had hoped it would be,” she said. “But that’s just motivated me to do even better next year.”

Longley began the season with an 11th-place finish in Acapulco, Mexico where she nailed 70 of a possible 75 targets with her 12-gauge Beretta shotgun.

She followed that up with an event in Larnaka, Cyprus at the end of April, where she finished 43rd, scoring a 61.

Then she set sights on the Junior World Cup Shotgun in Porpetto, Italy, where she came 14th, hitting 56 targets over three rounds.

In September, she competed at the junior division at the ISSF World Championship in Moscow, Russia, where she shot a 59 to place 23rd.

“I’m happy with how I did at the World Championships, because that was my first time competing at the World Championships,” she said. “It was definitely a new experience and the level of competition there is so high. It was amazing to meet all these people that are Olympians and gold medallists.”

Longley said despite the season not going how she’d hoped, especially after the lofty beginnings in Acapulco, she’s not making excuses for her results.“Sometimes you set goals and for whatever reason you don’t meet them,” she said. “It just gives you the drive and motivation for the next season.”

The McMaster student noted she switched coaches midseason from Florin Marinache, who remains her coach with the national team, to Allen Chubb.

“Switching in the middle of the season definitely was difficult,” she admitted, “but I’m really confident in the changes we’ll make in the off-season and looking forward to where we’ll go from there.”

Longley said she doesn’t plan to make any major changes, but rather tweak her overall training plans and mental management, among other things.

She said then highlight of her season was the 11th place finish in Acapulco.

“That was a pretty amazing experience for me.”

Meanwhile, Longley also placed fourth among senior women at the national championships, which were held in Toronto in July.

However, she will be ranked third among Canadian women next season.

“I will be going to World Cups next year, but we’ll have selection shoots for things like the Continental American Championship (CAT),” she said, noting the CAT is qualification competition for the Olympic Games.

Heading into Nationals, Longley said she expected to place third or fourth, adding making the national team was her goal.

“By the shooting the score in Acapulco and shooting the score in Cyprus I made the national travel team,” she said.

In addition, Longley was selected by Petro-Canada to receive a $10,000 Fuelling Athletes and Coaching Excellence (FACE) Program grant. The grant, awarded to 55 young Canadian athletes from 40 different summer and winter sports, supports up-and-coming athletes when they need it most: when they are striving to represent Canada at the Olympic or Paralympic Games, but don’t yet qualify for government funding.

Past recipients include gold medallists Hayley Wickenheiser, Rosie MacLennan and Mark Tewksbury.

Longley said she is very thankful to receive the grant.

“It allowed me to go and get my coaching certification,” she said, noting she is now an ISSF Level D certified coach. “It’s the first level to an international-level coach.

“I am one of the youngest, if not the youngest, to get this certification, so it’s pretty amazing.”

Longley, who is a third-year earth and environmental science student at McMaster University in Hamilton, said it can be difficult to balance training and school.

“I miss a fair bit of classes and stuff,” she said. “But at McMaster they’ve been extremely accommodating for me.

“I haven’t had any major problems or anything.”

From a training standpoint, Longley said it’s difficult to put a number on how much training she does.

“In the summer I was up at the range in Barrie four or five times a week,” she said. “8 a.m. until 4 or 5 p.m. – so it gets long.”

While she used to shoot once per week at the range in the winter, she’s recently spent more time focusing on strength training, swimming and yoga.

“It’s pretty variable,” she said of her training schedule.

Longley noted trap shooting has one of the longest running competitive seasons – starting Feb. 1 and running until Oct. 31.

“This year, New Delhi was the first World Cup of the season in February,” she said, adding the last World Cup event of the season was May, prior to the World Championships in September.

Heading into next season, Longley said she hopes to meet her goals.

“I just want to perform to the best of my ability and make my country proud,” she said.

Longley noted she’s not sure which World Cup events she’ll compete in yet, adding they’ll make that decision in January. As she’s the third-ranked Canadian, Longley will get the third choice of next year’s World Cup events.

“But they’re doing new rules for major games,” she said, adding to qualify for the CAT games and World Championships she has to shoot well at qualifying competitions.

The 2017 season was Longley’s last year competing as a junior and while she competed on the senior tour as a junior this year, she’s looking forward to the competition next season.

“Being able to do both at the same time was beneficial to me,” she said of her experience this year. “Because I think it’s going to make for an easier transition to the senior circuit. “I’m looking forward to that.”

Waterdown trapshooter Elizabeth Longley reflects on World Cup season

19-year-old McMaster University student is top-ranked junior on ISSF senior circuit

Sports Oct 12, 2017 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Waterdown trapshooter Elizabeth Longley is the top ranked junior shooter on the International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF) women’s trap rankings.

The 19 year-old is currently ranked 41st in the world, and while she started the season really well, Longley said she had some difficulties as the season went on.

“The end of the season wasn’t what I had hoped it would be,” she said. “But that’s just motivated me to do even better next year.”

Longley began the season with an 11th-place finish in Acapulco, Mexico where she nailed 70 of a possible 75 targets with her 12-gauge Beretta shotgun.

She followed that up with an event in Larnaka, Cyprus at the end of April, where she finished 43rd, scoring a 61.

Then she set sights on the Junior World Cup Shotgun in Porpetto, Italy, where she came 14th, hitting 56 targets over three rounds.

In September, she competed at the junior division at the ISSF World Championship in Moscow, Russia, where she shot a 59 to place 23rd.

“I’m happy with how I did at the World Championships, because that was my first time competing at the World Championships,” she said. “It was definitely a new experience and the level of competition there is so high. It was amazing to meet all these people that are Olympians and gold medallists.”

Longley said despite the season not going how she’d hoped, especially after the lofty beginnings in Acapulco, she’s not making excuses for her results.“Sometimes you set goals and for whatever reason you don’t meet them,” she said. “It just gives you the drive and motivation for the next season.”

The McMaster student noted she switched coaches midseason from Florin Marinache, who remains her coach with the national team, to Allen Chubb.

“Switching in the middle of the season definitely was difficult,” she admitted, “but I’m really confident in the changes we’ll make in the off-season and looking forward to where we’ll go from there.”

Longley said she doesn’t plan to make any major changes, but rather tweak her overall training plans and mental management, among other things.

She said then highlight of her season was the 11th place finish in Acapulco.

“That was a pretty amazing experience for me.”

Meanwhile, Longley also placed fourth among senior women at the national championships, which were held in Toronto in July.

However, she will be ranked third among Canadian women next season.

“I will be going to World Cups next year, but we’ll have selection shoots for things like the Continental American Championship (CAT),” she said, noting the CAT is qualification competition for the Olympic Games.

Heading into Nationals, Longley said she expected to place third or fourth, adding making the national team was her goal.

“By the shooting the score in Acapulco and shooting the score in Cyprus I made the national travel team,” she said.

In addition, Longley was selected by Petro-Canada to receive a $10,000 Fuelling Athletes and Coaching Excellence (FACE) Program grant. The grant, awarded to 55 young Canadian athletes from 40 different summer and winter sports, supports up-and-coming athletes when they need it most: when they are striving to represent Canada at the Olympic or Paralympic Games, but don’t yet qualify for government funding.

Past recipients include gold medallists Hayley Wickenheiser, Rosie MacLennan and Mark Tewksbury.

Longley said she is very thankful to receive the grant.

“It allowed me to go and get my coaching certification,” she said, noting she is now an ISSF Level D certified coach. “It’s the first level to an international-level coach.

“I am one of the youngest, if not the youngest, to get this certification, so it’s pretty amazing.”

Longley, who is a third-year earth and environmental science student at McMaster University in Hamilton, said it can be difficult to balance training and school.

“I miss a fair bit of classes and stuff,” she said. “But at McMaster they’ve been extremely accommodating for me.

“I haven’t had any major problems or anything.”

From a training standpoint, Longley said it’s difficult to put a number on how much training she does.

“In the summer I was up at the range in Barrie four or five times a week,” she said. “8 a.m. until 4 or 5 p.m. – so it gets long.”

While she used to shoot once per week at the range in the winter, she’s recently spent more time focusing on strength training, swimming and yoga.

“It’s pretty variable,” she said of her training schedule.

Longley noted trap shooting has one of the longest running competitive seasons – starting Feb. 1 and running until Oct. 31.

“This year, New Delhi was the first World Cup of the season in February,” she said, adding the last World Cup event of the season was May, prior to the World Championships in September.

Heading into next season, Longley said she hopes to meet her goals.

“I just want to perform to the best of my ability and make my country proud,” she said.

Longley noted she’s not sure which World Cup events she’ll compete in yet, adding they’ll make that decision in January. As she’s the third-ranked Canadian, Longley will get the third choice of next year’s World Cup events.

“But they’re doing new rules for major games,” she said, adding to qualify for the CAT games and World Championships she has to shoot well at qualifying competitions.

The 2017 season was Longley’s last year competing as a junior and while she competed on the senior tour as a junior this year, she’s looking forward to the competition next season.

“Being able to do both at the same time was beneficial to me,” she said of her experience this year. “Because I think it’s going to make for an easier transition to the senior circuit. “I’m looking forward to that.”

Waterdown trapshooter Elizabeth Longley reflects on World Cup season

19-year-old McMaster University student is top-ranked junior on ISSF senior circuit

Sports Oct 12, 2017 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

Waterdown trapshooter Elizabeth Longley is the top ranked junior shooter on the International Shooting Sport Federation (ISSF) women’s trap rankings.

The 19 year-old is currently ranked 41st in the world, and while she started the season really well, Longley said she had some difficulties as the season went on.

“The end of the season wasn’t what I had hoped it would be,” she said. “But that’s just motivated me to do even better next year.”

Longley began the season with an 11th-place finish in Acapulco, Mexico where she nailed 70 of a possible 75 targets with her 12-gauge Beretta shotgun.

She followed that up with an event in Larnaka, Cyprus at the end of April, where she finished 43rd, scoring a 61.

Then she set sights on the Junior World Cup Shotgun in Porpetto, Italy, where she came 14th, hitting 56 targets over three rounds.

In September, she competed at the junior division at the ISSF World Championship in Moscow, Russia, where she shot a 59 to place 23rd.

“I’m happy with how I did at the World Championships, because that was my first time competing at the World Championships,” she said. “It was definitely a new experience and the level of competition there is so high. It was amazing to meet all these people that are Olympians and gold medallists.”

Longley said despite the season not going how she’d hoped, especially after the lofty beginnings in Acapulco, she’s not making excuses for her results.“Sometimes you set goals and for whatever reason you don’t meet them,” she said. “It just gives you the drive and motivation for the next season.”

The McMaster student noted she switched coaches midseason from Florin Marinache, who remains her coach with the national team, to Allen Chubb.

“Switching in the middle of the season definitely was difficult,” she admitted, “but I’m really confident in the changes we’ll make in the off-season and looking forward to where we’ll go from there.”

Longley said she doesn’t plan to make any major changes, but rather tweak her overall training plans and mental management, among other things.

She said then highlight of her season was the 11th place finish in Acapulco.

“That was a pretty amazing experience for me.”

Meanwhile, Longley also placed fourth among senior women at the national championships, which were held in Toronto in July.

However, she will be ranked third among Canadian women next season.

“I will be going to World Cups next year, but we’ll have selection shoots for things like the Continental American Championship (CAT),” she said, noting the CAT is qualification competition for the Olympic Games.

Heading into Nationals, Longley said she expected to place third or fourth, adding making the national team was her goal.

“By the shooting the score in Acapulco and shooting the score in Cyprus I made the national travel team,” she said.

In addition, Longley was selected by Petro-Canada to receive a $10,000 Fuelling Athletes and Coaching Excellence (FACE) Program grant. The grant, awarded to 55 young Canadian athletes from 40 different summer and winter sports, supports up-and-coming athletes when they need it most: when they are striving to represent Canada at the Olympic or Paralympic Games, but don’t yet qualify for government funding.

Past recipients include gold medallists Hayley Wickenheiser, Rosie MacLennan and Mark Tewksbury.

Longley said she is very thankful to receive the grant.

“It allowed me to go and get my coaching certification,” she said, noting she is now an ISSF Level D certified coach. “It’s the first level to an international-level coach.

“I am one of the youngest, if not the youngest, to get this certification, so it’s pretty amazing.”

Longley, who is a third-year earth and environmental science student at McMaster University in Hamilton, said it can be difficult to balance training and school.

“I miss a fair bit of classes and stuff,” she said. “But at McMaster they’ve been extremely accommodating for me.

“I haven’t had any major problems or anything.”

From a training standpoint, Longley said it’s difficult to put a number on how much training she does.

“In the summer I was up at the range in Barrie four or five times a week,” she said. “8 a.m. until 4 or 5 p.m. – so it gets long.”

While she used to shoot once per week at the range in the winter, she’s recently spent more time focusing on strength training, swimming and yoga.

“It’s pretty variable,” she said of her training schedule.

Longley noted trap shooting has one of the longest running competitive seasons – starting Feb. 1 and running until Oct. 31.

“This year, New Delhi was the first World Cup of the season in February,” she said, adding the last World Cup event of the season was May, prior to the World Championships in September.

Heading into next season, Longley said she hopes to meet her goals.

“I just want to perform to the best of my ability and make my country proud,” she said.

Longley noted she’s not sure which World Cup events she’ll compete in yet, adding they’ll make that decision in January. As she’s the third-ranked Canadian, Longley will get the third choice of next year’s World Cup events.

“But they’re doing new rules for major games,” she said, adding to qualify for the CAT games and World Championships she has to shoot well at qualifying competitions.

The 2017 season was Longley’s last year competing as a junior and while she competed on the senior tour as a junior this year, she’s looking forward to the competition next season.

“Being able to do both at the same time was beneficial to me,” she said of her experience this year. “Because I think it’s going to make for an easier transition to the senior circuit. “I’m looking forward to that.”