Waterdown student digs into the past for unique photography assignment

WhatsOn Nov 22, 2015 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

When Ashley Ciona was handed a landscape architecture assignment by her instructor at Sheridan College, the photography student knew she was being asked to step outside her comfort zone.

So she turned it into a personal challenge, and came up with a piece that not only scored her a decent mark, but also added a little bit to the history of her home town.

The finished project, a series of black and archival photos superimposed over their present-day locations, complete with the hand of her friend Aarin Hackel in each frame, reflect the past and present – and the way we interact with the landmarks around us.

“I don’t normally shoot landscapes; I like to shoot portraits,” the 18-year-old first-year student explained.

“I picked Waterdown because there are so many older buildings,” Ciona added.

She was aided in her efforts by Lyn Lunstead at Flamborough Archives, who provided digital copies of the images Ciona wanted to re-create.

Ciona and Hackel spent time during the college’s October reading week executing the photos. The most challenging part, said Ciona, was dodging traffic on Dundas Street as she tried to line up the shots for the Dairy Queen and the corner at Hamilton Street.

Ciona says the seed for the idea of using archival photos was planted well before she even knew of the assignment – back when she was tagging along on Waterdown District High School history teacher Nathan Tidridge’s annual class trip when she was in Grade 11.

“Mr. Tidridge invited me and a friend to go on his ‘Flamborough Road Trip,’” she explained, noting the day-long trek reaches destinations throughout Flamborough, including Rockton, Greensville and Smokey Hollow. “We learned the history of the different areas.”

Ciona is happy with the finished series, but says she has to re-shoot a couple that turned out to be inaccurate in terms of placement.

“The whole class found them really interesting,” she said.

“I would love to do it again.”

Waterdown student digs into the past for unique photography assignment

WhatsOn Nov 22, 2015 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

When Ashley Ciona was handed a landscape architecture assignment by her instructor at Sheridan College, the photography student knew she was being asked to step outside her comfort zone.

So she turned it into a personal challenge, and came up with a piece that not only scored her a decent mark, but also added a little bit to the history of her home town.

The finished project, a series of black and archival photos superimposed over their present-day locations, complete with the hand of her friend Aarin Hackel in each frame, reflect the past and present – and the way we interact with the landmarks around us.

“I don’t normally shoot landscapes; I like to shoot portraits,” the 18-year-old first-year student explained.

“I picked Waterdown because there are so many older buildings,” Ciona added.

She was aided in her efforts by Lyn Lunstead at Flamborough Archives, who provided digital copies of the images Ciona wanted to re-create.

Ciona and Hackel spent time during the college’s October reading week executing the photos. The most challenging part, said Ciona, was dodging traffic on Dundas Street as she tried to line up the shots for the Dairy Queen and the corner at Hamilton Street.

Ciona says the seed for the idea of using archival photos was planted well before she even knew of the assignment – back when she was tagging along on Waterdown District High School history teacher Nathan Tidridge’s annual class trip when she was in Grade 11.

“Mr. Tidridge invited me and a friend to go on his ‘Flamborough Road Trip,’” she explained, noting the day-long trek reaches destinations throughout Flamborough, including Rockton, Greensville and Smokey Hollow. “We learned the history of the different areas.”

Ciona is happy with the finished series, but says she has to re-shoot a couple that turned out to be inaccurate in terms of placement.

“The whole class found them really interesting,” she said.

“I would love to do it again.”

Waterdown student digs into the past for unique photography assignment

WhatsOn Nov 22, 2015 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

When Ashley Ciona was handed a landscape architecture assignment by her instructor at Sheridan College, the photography student knew she was being asked to step outside her comfort zone.

So she turned it into a personal challenge, and came up with a piece that not only scored her a decent mark, but also added a little bit to the history of her home town.

The finished project, a series of black and archival photos superimposed over their present-day locations, complete with the hand of her friend Aarin Hackel in each frame, reflect the past and present – and the way we interact with the landmarks around us.

“I don’t normally shoot landscapes; I like to shoot portraits,” the 18-year-old first-year student explained.

“I picked Waterdown because there are so many older buildings,” Ciona added.

She was aided in her efforts by Lyn Lunstead at Flamborough Archives, who provided digital copies of the images Ciona wanted to re-create.

Ciona and Hackel spent time during the college’s October reading week executing the photos. The most challenging part, said Ciona, was dodging traffic on Dundas Street as she tried to line up the shots for the Dairy Queen and the corner at Hamilton Street.

Ciona says the seed for the idea of using archival photos was planted well before she even knew of the assignment – back when she was tagging along on Waterdown District High School history teacher Nathan Tidridge’s annual class trip when she was in Grade 11.

“Mr. Tidridge invited me and a friend to go on his ‘Flamborough Road Trip,’” she explained, noting the day-long trek reaches destinations throughout Flamborough, including Rockton, Greensville and Smokey Hollow. “We learned the history of the different areas.”

Ciona is happy with the finished series, but says she has to re-shoot a couple that turned out to be inaccurate in terms of placement.

“The whole class found them really interesting,” she said.

“I would love to do it again.”