The Lobster entertaining and baffling, but fully in command of its crazy world: review

WhatsOn Mar 24, 2016 by Peter Howell OurWindsor.Ca

There is no sanity claws for Yorgos Lanthimos. The Oscar-nommed Dogtooth helmer ups the ante in every way with The Lobster, his first English-language movie, coscripted with his Dogtooth co-writer Efthymis Filippou. It comes with a bigger budget and boldface talent, plus a significantly grander mind flip.

Call it “high” concept: In a future world, people who don’t get married are turned into animals. They’re sent to a specially designed hotel/prison, where they are given 45 days to pair up or face beastly change. There are other Byzantine rules, no bonding by loners being among them. It’s a real challenge for newly single introvert David (Colin Farrell) and the visually impaired woman (Rachel Weisz) whom he has eyes for.

Bone-dry dystopian satire, with Lanthimos piling absurdity upon absurdity, results in a film that is by turns entertaining and baffling, but also fully in command of its crazy world.

Toronto Star

The Lobster entertaining and baffling, but fully in command of its crazy world: review

WhatsOn Mar 24, 2016 by Peter Howell OurWindsor.Ca

There is no sanity claws for Yorgos Lanthimos. The Oscar-nommed Dogtooth helmer ups the ante in every way with The Lobster, his first English-language movie, coscripted with his Dogtooth co-writer Efthymis Filippou. It comes with a bigger budget and boldface talent, plus a significantly grander mind flip.

Call it “high” concept: In a future world, people who don’t get married are turned into animals. They’re sent to a specially designed hotel/prison, where they are given 45 days to pair up or face beastly change. There are other Byzantine rules, no bonding by loners being among them. It’s a real challenge for newly single introvert David (Colin Farrell) and the visually impaired woman (Rachel Weisz) whom he has eyes for.

Bone-dry dystopian satire, with Lanthimos piling absurdity upon absurdity, results in a film that is by turns entertaining and baffling, but also fully in command of its crazy world.

Toronto Star

The Lobster entertaining and baffling, but fully in command of its crazy world: review

WhatsOn Mar 24, 2016 by Peter Howell OurWindsor.Ca

There is no sanity claws for Yorgos Lanthimos. The Oscar-nommed Dogtooth helmer ups the ante in every way with The Lobster, his first English-language movie, coscripted with his Dogtooth co-writer Efthymis Filippou. It comes with a bigger budget and boldface talent, plus a significantly grander mind flip.

Call it “high” concept: In a future world, people who don’t get married are turned into animals. They’re sent to a specially designed hotel/prison, where they are given 45 days to pair up or face beastly change. There are other Byzantine rules, no bonding by loners being among them. It’s a real challenge for newly single introvert David (Colin Farrell) and the visually impaired woman (Rachel Weisz) whom he has eyes for.

Bone-dry dystopian satire, with Lanthimos piling absurdity upon absurdity, results in a film that is by turns entertaining and baffling, but also fully in command of its crazy world.

Toronto Star