Dundas Valley School of Art holds 46th art auction

WhatsOn Apr 01, 2016 by Regina Haggo Hamilton Spectator

Some landscapes offer more than a pleasant view. Jan Kendrick's "Horse Homestead" is one of these.

She's painted a big blue barn in a sunny field somewhere around Orangeville. The barn shelters the past and the present.

"Not too long ago this farm was a busy dairy business," she tells me. "I have only known it as home to Smokey Joe and Reno, two gentle horses that have the run of the place. The barn keeps them cool in the summer and shelters them in the winter."

Kendrick's oil is one of many treasures in the Dundas Valley School of Art's 46th annual art auction.

This is the biggest fundraiser of the year for the school. This year's event consists, as usual, of a live auction and a silent one. More than a thousand paintings, sculptures, ceramics, prints, photographs, jewelry and textiles by emerging and established artists are up for grabs.

Silent auction bidding starts Thursday. The live auction begins at 8 p.m. next Saturday with 51 works under the hammer in the Loft, the scene of sometimes frantic bidding later in the evening.

Kendrick's rural view is one highlight of the live auction list. In another, Lynn Schumacher takes to the wilds in "Georgian Bay Shoals."

Working in a lifelike style, Schumacher draws attention to the varied and intricate patterns found in the rocks and water. We enter in the left foreground and find ourselves high up among the rocks, an appropriately dramatic entry for an encounter with the wilderness.

Grace Afonso hits the streets of Dundas for "The Way Home," in particular, Park and Albert streets. But the artist is creating a painting, not imitating what's there. For one thing, she paints the houses in whatever colours suit her. And she creates a wonderfully textured surface by building up paint in some areas and thinning it in others.

The human figure stars in Kawong Chung-Shipman's "Christie's Dog." The artist pairs a simplified, spacious composition with an enigmatic narrative.

There are three parts to the story: a woman on the right, a dog on the left and a barely there landscape.

The woman dominates the right side. This might suggest we focus on her as our guide into the work. But she has her back to us and gazes to the right, moving us out of the painting.

Susan Outlaw's "Physalis Pruinosa on Pewter," a still life, offers an image of abundance and an appeal to the senses. Ground cherries spill onto a shimmery surface, creating a contrast between the delicate segmented husk of the fruit and the smooth, hard surface of the metal.

Outlaw works in a lifelike style. Laurie Wonfor Nolan's "Blue Vase and Sugar Bag" is sketchier. A vase filled with yellow and purple flowers takes centre stage, the stems arranged into in a kind of dynamic triangle that looks as though it's about to fall apart.

Other offerings in the live auction include work by Linda Blakney, Robert Bateman, Gisele Comtois, Sandee Ewasiuk, Peter Fischer, Catherine Gibbon, Guennadi Kalinine, Peter Kirkland, Iris McDermott, Marla Panko, E. Robert Ross and Paul Simon.

Regina Haggo, art historian, public speaker, curator and former professor at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, teaches at the Dundas Valley School of Art.

dhaggo@thespec.com

Dundas Valley School of Art holds 46th art auction

More than 1,000 works, in a variety of media, are up for sale

WhatsOn Apr 01, 2016 by Regina Haggo Hamilton Spectator

Some landscapes offer more than a pleasant view. Jan Kendrick's "Horse Homestead" is one of these.

She's painted a big blue barn in a sunny field somewhere around Orangeville. The barn shelters the past and the present.

"Not too long ago this farm was a busy dairy business," she tells me. "I have only known it as home to Smokey Joe and Reno, two gentle horses that have the run of the place. The barn keeps them cool in the summer and shelters them in the winter."

Kendrick's oil is one of many treasures in the Dundas Valley School of Art's 46th annual art auction.

This is the biggest fundraiser of the year for the school. This year's event consists, as usual, of a live auction and a silent one. More than a thousand paintings, sculptures, ceramics, prints, photographs, jewelry and textiles by emerging and established artists are up for grabs.

Silent auction bidding starts Thursday. The live auction begins at 8 p.m. next Saturday with 51 works under the hammer in the Loft, the scene of sometimes frantic bidding later in the evening.

Kendrick's rural view is one highlight of the live auction list. In another, Lynn Schumacher takes to the wilds in "Georgian Bay Shoals."

Working in a lifelike style, Schumacher draws attention to the varied and intricate patterns found in the rocks and water. We enter in the left foreground and find ourselves high up among the rocks, an appropriately dramatic entry for an encounter with the wilderness.

Grace Afonso hits the streets of Dundas for "The Way Home," in particular, Park and Albert streets. But the artist is creating a painting, not imitating what's there. For one thing, she paints the houses in whatever colours suit her. And she creates a wonderfully textured surface by building up paint in some areas and thinning it in others.

The human figure stars in Kawong Chung-Shipman's "Christie's Dog." The artist pairs a simplified, spacious composition with an enigmatic narrative.

There are three parts to the story: a woman on the right, a dog on the left and a barely there landscape.

The woman dominates the right side. This might suggest we focus on her as our guide into the work. But she has her back to us and gazes to the right, moving us out of the painting.

Susan Outlaw's "Physalis Pruinosa on Pewter," a still life, offers an image of abundance and an appeal to the senses. Ground cherries spill onto a shimmery surface, creating a contrast between the delicate segmented husk of the fruit and the smooth, hard surface of the metal.

Outlaw works in a lifelike style. Laurie Wonfor Nolan's "Blue Vase and Sugar Bag" is sketchier. A vase filled with yellow and purple flowers takes centre stage, the stems arranged into in a kind of dynamic triangle that looks as though it's about to fall apart.

Other offerings in the live auction include work by Linda Blakney, Robert Bateman, Gisele Comtois, Sandee Ewasiuk, Peter Fischer, Catherine Gibbon, Guennadi Kalinine, Peter Kirkland, Iris McDermott, Marla Panko, E. Robert Ross and Paul Simon.

Regina Haggo, art historian, public speaker, curator and former professor at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, teaches at the Dundas Valley School of Art.

dhaggo@thespec.com

Dundas Valley School of Art holds 46th art auction

More than 1,000 works, in a variety of media, are up for sale

WhatsOn Apr 01, 2016 by Regina Haggo Hamilton Spectator

Some landscapes offer more than a pleasant view. Jan Kendrick's "Horse Homestead" is one of these.

She's painted a big blue barn in a sunny field somewhere around Orangeville. The barn shelters the past and the present.

"Not too long ago this farm was a busy dairy business," she tells me. "I have only known it as home to Smokey Joe and Reno, two gentle horses that have the run of the place. The barn keeps them cool in the summer and shelters them in the winter."

Kendrick's oil is one of many treasures in the Dundas Valley School of Art's 46th annual art auction.

This is the biggest fundraiser of the year for the school. This year's event consists, as usual, of a live auction and a silent one. More than a thousand paintings, sculptures, ceramics, prints, photographs, jewelry and textiles by emerging and established artists are up for grabs.

Silent auction bidding starts Thursday. The live auction begins at 8 p.m. next Saturday with 51 works under the hammer in the Loft, the scene of sometimes frantic bidding later in the evening.

Kendrick's rural view is one highlight of the live auction list. In another, Lynn Schumacher takes to the wilds in "Georgian Bay Shoals."

Working in a lifelike style, Schumacher draws attention to the varied and intricate patterns found in the rocks and water. We enter in the left foreground and find ourselves high up among the rocks, an appropriately dramatic entry for an encounter with the wilderness.

Grace Afonso hits the streets of Dundas for "The Way Home," in particular, Park and Albert streets. But the artist is creating a painting, not imitating what's there. For one thing, she paints the houses in whatever colours suit her. And she creates a wonderfully textured surface by building up paint in some areas and thinning it in others.

The human figure stars in Kawong Chung-Shipman's "Christie's Dog." The artist pairs a simplified, spacious composition with an enigmatic narrative.

There are three parts to the story: a woman on the right, a dog on the left and a barely there landscape.

The woman dominates the right side. This might suggest we focus on her as our guide into the work. But she has her back to us and gazes to the right, moving us out of the painting.

Susan Outlaw's "Physalis Pruinosa on Pewter," a still life, offers an image of abundance and an appeal to the senses. Ground cherries spill onto a shimmery surface, creating a contrast between the delicate segmented husk of the fruit and the smooth, hard surface of the metal.

Outlaw works in a lifelike style. Laurie Wonfor Nolan's "Blue Vase and Sugar Bag" is sketchier. A vase filled with yellow and purple flowers takes centre stage, the stems arranged into in a kind of dynamic triangle that looks as though it's about to fall apart.

Other offerings in the live auction include work by Linda Blakney, Robert Bateman, Gisele Comtois, Sandee Ewasiuk, Peter Fischer, Catherine Gibbon, Guennadi Kalinine, Peter Kirkland, Iris McDermott, Marla Panko, E. Robert Ross and Paul Simon.

Regina Haggo, art historian, public speaker, curator and former professor at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, teaches at the Dundas Valley School of Art.

dhaggo@thespec.com