Waterdown author pens a book to grow up with

WhatsOn Apr 01, 2016 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

Children will need to make space on their bookshelves for the first published work by Waterdown writer Cheryl Neal.

The therapist and children’s pastor will be holding a book-signing event on Sat., April 2 at the Glad Tidings Church in Burlington.

The event, which is located at 1401 Guelph Line, will start at 2 p.m. It includes refreshments and a reading followed by a signing.

Neal, who penned the book in 2007, said she was inspired to write it after seeing a pattern emerging amongst the young people within her congregation at the church.

“In my classes, I saw a lot of young adults that were just striving and striving and striving and trying to prove something to the world,” she said. “I wanted to write a book that says ‘that you are good enough, no matter if you succeed not because what you do but because of who you are.’”

The book, entitled You Belong to Me is about a little girl who goes on a search one day to discover why her parents love her. According to the author, the little girl assumes it must be because of the things she does. Soon, however, she discovers it’s not what she does but who she is that ultimately gives her family joy.

Neal explains that in the course of the book, the little girl’s dad tells her, “It’s because you belong to me, that’s why you’re important.”

According to the author, there is a close connection between self-esteem and performance. She believes that there is a fine line between the two, which has been stepped over too often, and society needs to change its focus.

“We need to help people to realize that there is a fine balance between what you give to the word and I want my kids to be contributing to society but also there is merit just because you simply belong,” she said.

Since the book was published in early February, Neal has received praise and support from people in her life. Although it took nine years to publish, she said it was worth the wait.

As for her own family, she has two adopted sons, one of whom has dark skin.

“He’s only two, I’m sure we’re going to get the calls that say ‘he doesn’t really belong to you’ and I really wanted to make sure that `my kids both knew that no matter how they came into this world, that they belong to me and they will always belong to me,” she said.

When Neal was in the process of titling the story, she said her editor disagreed with the term “belong.” Her editor was concerned psychologists may not like the title of the book and that it implied that children are possessions; she wanted a title that reflected more reciprocation within the relationship.

“My next book is going to be called I, as a Parent, Belong to You,’” Neal said. “So I thanked her for the idea and kept the title,” she added.

Neal said that by taking inspiration from her life, she has with plenty of material to work with that could eventually turn into stories. As a therapist and pastor, she feels honoured to have people take her into their confidence and feels having that responsibility influences her writing.

“I find people’s stories fascinating and to help them through some of the hardest times of their lives and that they trust me to help them on that journey is mind-boggling, actually.”

Waterdown author pens a book to grow up with

Book signing Apr. 2 in Burlington

WhatsOn Apr 01, 2016 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

Children will need to make space on their bookshelves for the first published work by Waterdown writer Cheryl Neal.

The therapist and children’s pastor will be holding a book-signing event on Sat., April 2 at the Glad Tidings Church in Burlington.

The event, which is located at 1401 Guelph Line, will start at 2 p.m. It includes refreshments and a reading followed by a signing.

Neal, who penned the book in 2007, said she was inspired to write it after seeing a pattern emerging amongst the young people within her congregation at the church.

“In my classes, I saw a lot of young adults that were just striving and striving and striving and trying to prove something to the world,” she said. “I wanted to write a book that says ‘that you are good enough, no matter if you succeed not because what you do but because of who you are.’”

The book, entitled You Belong to Me is about a little girl who goes on a search one day to discover why her parents love her. According to the author, the little girl assumes it must be because of the things she does. Soon, however, she discovers it’s not what she does but who she is that ultimately gives her family joy.

Neal explains that in the course of the book, the little girl’s dad tells her, “It’s because you belong to me, that’s why you’re important.”

According to the author, there is a close connection between self-esteem and performance. She believes that there is a fine line between the two, which has been stepped over too often, and society needs to change its focus.

“We need to help people to realize that there is a fine balance between what you give to the word and I want my kids to be contributing to society but also there is merit just because you simply belong,” she said.

Since the book was published in early February, Neal has received praise and support from people in her life. Although it took nine years to publish, she said it was worth the wait.

As for her own family, she has two adopted sons, one of whom has dark skin.

“He’s only two, I’m sure we’re going to get the calls that say ‘he doesn’t really belong to you’ and I really wanted to make sure that `my kids both knew that no matter how they came into this world, that they belong to me and they will always belong to me,” she said.

When Neal was in the process of titling the story, she said her editor disagreed with the term “belong.” Her editor was concerned psychologists may not like the title of the book and that it implied that children are possessions; she wanted a title that reflected more reciprocation within the relationship.

“My next book is going to be called I, as a Parent, Belong to You,’” Neal said. “So I thanked her for the idea and kept the title,” she added.

Neal said that by taking inspiration from her life, she has with plenty of material to work with that could eventually turn into stories. As a therapist and pastor, she feels honoured to have people take her into their confidence and feels having that responsibility influences her writing.

“I find people’s stories fascinating and to help them through some of the hardest times of their lives and that they trust me to help them on that journey is mind-boggling, actually.”

Waterdown author pens a book to grow up with

Book signing Apr. 2 in Burlington

WhatsOn Apr 01, 2016 by Brenda Jefferies Flamborough Review

Children will need to make space on their bookshelves for the first published work by Waterdown writer Cheryl Neal.

The therapist and children’s pastor will be holding a book-signing event on Sat., April 2 at the Glad Tidings Church in Burlington.

The event, which is located at 1401 Guelph Line, will start at 2 p.m. It includes refreshments and a reading followed by a signing.

Neal, who penned the book in 2007, said she was inspired to write it after seeing a pattern emerging amongst the young people within her congregation at the church.

“In my classes, I saw a lot of young adults that were just striving and striving and striving and trying to prove something to the world,” she said. “I wanted to write a book that says ‘that you are good enough, no matter if you succeed not because what you do but because of who you are.’”

The book, entitled You Belong to Me is about a little girl who goes on a search one day to discover why her parents love her. According to the author, the little girl assumes it must be because of the things she does. Soon, however, she discovers it’s not what she does but who she is that ultimately gives her family joy.

Neal explains that in the course of the book, the little girl’s dad tells her, “It’s because you belong to me, that’s why you’re important.”

According to the author, there is a close connection between self-esteem and performance. She believes that there is a fine line between the two, which has been stepped over too often, and society needs to change its focus.

“We need to help people to realize that there is a fine balance between what you give to the word and I want my kids to be contributing to society but also there is merit just because you simply belong,” she said.

Since the book was published in early February, Neal has received praise and support from people in her life. Although it took nine years to publish, she said it was worth the wait.

As for her own family, she has two adopted sons, one of whom has dark skin.

“He’s only two, I’m sure we’re going to get the calls that say ‘he doesn’t really belong to you’ and I really wanted to make sure that `my kids both knew that no matter how they came into this world, that they belong to me and they will always belong to me,” she said.

When Neal was in the process of titling the story, she said her editor disagreed with the term “belong.” Her editor was concerned psychologists may not like the title of the book and that it implied that children are possessions; she wanted a title that reflected more reciprocation within the relationship.

“My next book is going to be called I, as a Parent, Belong to You,’” Neal said. “So I thanked her for the idea and kept the title,” she added.

Neal said that by taking inspiration from her life, she has with plenty of material to work with that could eventually turn into stories. As a therapist and pastor, she feels honoured to have people take her into their confidence and feels having that responsibility influences her writing.

“I find people’s stories fascinating and to help them through some of the hardest times of their lives and that they trust me to help them on that journey is mind-boggling, actually.”