Brott Music Festival announces 2016 season

WhatsOn Apr 09, 2016 by Leonard Turnevicius Hamilton Spectator

Taking in the opening concert of the Brott Music Festival this June? Well, heigh-ho, heigh-ho, it's off to Brantford you go.

That's right, according to a Brott Festival press release, the 2016 season opens on Wednesday, June 22 in Brantford's Sanderson Centre for the Performing Arts with Jonathan Crow soloing in Tchaikovsky's "Violin Concerto" accompanied by Brott and his National Academy Orchestra. Robert Rival's "Overture" and Rimsky-Korsakov's "Scheherazade" fill out the bill.

"We couldn't find the right hall and we also wanted very much to, kind of, extend ourselves in other areas, and Brantford has a beautiful concert hall, and we thought we might like to try to do that," said Brott from his Hamilton home. "There's only so much we can put into Hamilton and have people come week after week after week. And so, we felt we needed to spread our wings a little bit, and Brantford seems like a logical place."

The following week, on June 30, Brott and his 50 NAO apprentices plus a handful of mentors flutter over to Waterdown's St. Thomas the Apostle Church for Beethoven's "Ninth Symphony" with vocal soloists Leslie Fagan, Mia Lennox, Michael Colvin, and James Westman.

The remaining concerts are being held in various venues, typical of festivals past. Mohawk College's McIntyre Performing Arts Centre will see PopOpera (July 7) and a staged performance of Mozart's opera, "Le Nozze di Figaro" (July 14), An Evening with John Williams (July 28), the Music of Led Zeppelin with Jeans 'n' Classics (August 5), From Tchaikovsky to Ravel with pianist Sara Davis Buechner (August 11), and Verdi's "Requiem" (August 18). Soprano-comedienne Natalie Choquette appears at Ancaster's Fieldcote Memorial Park (July 10), Ancaster-based pianist Valerie Tryon performs in Ancaster's St. John's Anglican (July 17), the Classic Blend Ladies' Barbershop Chorus harmonizes at Hamilton's Zoetic Theatre (July 23), and Chris Jason celebrates 100 Years of Frank Sinatra at LIUNA Station (August 12). Brott and crew will undertake two run-outs. The first, a Last Night of the Proms show with the aforementioned Mr. Crow in Toronto's Koerner Hall (August 3), the second, a concert with pianists Janina Fialkowska, James Anagnoson and Leslie Kinton at the Festival of the Sound in Parry Sound (August 7).

The press release also listed a performance of Puccini's opera "La bohème" slated for Hamilton Place on October 1, but gave no further details.

So, is "Bohème" a go?

"It's a go if the city council comes up with the money that we need in order to make it possible. It's that simple," said Brott. "We were able to get a project grant from the Canada Council. They (Canada Council and the Ontario Arts Council) basically want to see that the city, the locale is behind it in terms of sponsorship and in terms of civic funds. So, if we get the funding, we go ahead. Meanwhile we have hired everybody pro tem. That is to say, we've hired everybody with the understanding that if we don't get the money we won't go ahead."

When asked how much was being asked from the city, Brott answered, "Two hundred thousand dollars."

When Opera Hamilton/Opera Ontario was operational, a production would typically run in the neighbourhood of $300,000.

"We will probably be able to pull it in for less than that," surmised Brott. "We're pulling in a lot of favours. You can't do that all the time. I know for example that IATSE (International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees) has offered to give us a grant. Everywhere I go, I'm very encouraged we'll be able to make it work. We're expecting that we'll hear from the city, I'd say, within a month, no later than within a month. It's still not 100 per cent, but I think all indicators are favourable."

That said, Brott struck a cautious note about producing opera in Hamilton Place.

"We want to make sure that whatever we build doesn't fail like the last one did," said Brott in an obvious reference to Opera Hamilton. "We are operating in a time and era where we really need the support of everybody who loves opera. We recognize that, in a sense, a lot of people have been burned in the process of not getting their tickets or not getting the subscriptions they paid for, and people not getting paid, and people loosing money who were on the board, all kinds of bad blood, if you will, around. And yet there's nothing wrong with the art form itself. We just have to be absolutely careful that we put one foot in front of the other and know where we're going and not disappoint anyone. We've not disappointed anyone for 29 years and we don't intend to start now."

Tickets can be ordered through the Brott Festival box office at 905-525-7664 or online from Monday, April 11 onwards at www.brottmusic.com.

Leonard Turnevicius writes on classical music for The Hamilton Spectator.

leonardturnevicius@gmail.com

Brott Music Festival announces 2016 season

Brantford venue and possibility of full Hamilton Place opera part of 2016 season

WhatsOn Apr 09, 2016 by Leonard Turnevicius Hamilton Spectator

Taking in the opening concert of the Brott Music Festival this June? Well, heigh-ho, heigh-ho, it's off to Brantford you go.

That's right, according to a Brott Festival press release, the 2016 season opens on Wednesday, June 22 in Brantford's Sanderson Centre for the Performing Arts with Jonathan Crow soloing in Tchaikovsky's "Violin Concerto" accompanied by Brott and his National Academy Orchestra. Robert Rival's "Overture" and Rimsky-Korsakov's "Scheherazade" fill out the bill.

"We couldn't find the right hall and we also wanted very much to, kind of, extend ourselves in other areas, and Brantford has a beautiful concert hall, and we thought we might like to try to do that," said Brott from his Hamilton home. "There's only so much we can put into Hamilton and have people come week after week after week. And so, we felt we needed to spread our wings a little bit, and Brantford seems like a logical place."

The following week, on June 30, Brott and his 50 NAO apprentices plus a handful of mentors flutter over to Waterdown's St. Thomas the Apostle Church for Beethoven's "Ninth Symphony" with vocal soloists Leslie Fagan, Mia Lennox, Michael Colvin, and James Westman.

The remaining concerts are being held in various venues, typical of festivals past. Mohawk College's McIntyre Performing Arts Centre will see PopOpera (July 7) and a staged performance of Mozart's opera, "Le Nozze di Figaro" (July 14), An Evening with John Williams (July 28), the Music of Led Zeppelin with Jeans 'n' Classics (August 5), From Tchaikovsky to Ravel with pianist Sara Davis Buechner (August 11), and Verdi's "Requiem" (August 18). Soprano-comedienne Natalie Choquette appears at Ancaster's Fieldcote Memorial Park (July 10), Ancaster-based pianist Valerie Tryon performs in Ancaster's St. John's Anglican (July 17), the Classic Blend Ladies' Barbershop Chorus harmonizes at Hamilton's Zoetic Theatre (July 23), and Chris Jason celebrates 100 Years of Frank Sinatra at LIUNA Station (August 12). Brott and crew will undertake two run-outs. The first, a Last Night of the Proms show with the aforementioned Mr. Crow in Toronto's Koerner Hall (August 3), the second, a concert with pianists Janina Fialkowska, James Anagnoson and Leslie Kinton at the Festival of the Sound in Parry Sound (August 7).

The press release also listed a performance of Puccini's opera "La bohème" slated for Hamilton Place on October 1, but gave no further details.

So, is "Bohème" a go?

"It's a go if the city council comes up with the money that we need in order to make it possible. It's that simple," said Brott. "We were able to get a project grant from the Canada Council. They (Canada Council and the Ontario Arts Council) basically want to see that the city, the locale is behind it in terms of sponsorship and in terms of civic funds. So, if we get the funding, we go ahead. Meanwhile we have hired everybody pro tem. That is to say, we've hired everybody with the understanding that if we don't get the money we won't go ahead."

When asked how much was being asked from the city, Brott answered, "Two hundred thousand dollars."

When Opera Hamilton/Opera Ontario was operational, a production would typically run in the neighbourhood of $300,000.

"We will probably be able to pull it in for less than that," surmised Brott. "We're pulling in a lot of favours. You can't do that all the time. I know for example that IATSE (International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees) has offered to give us a grant. Everywhere I go, I'm very encouraged we'll be able to make it work. We're expecting that we'll hear from the city, I'd say, within a month, no later than within a month. It's still not 100 per cent, but I think all indicators are favourable."

That said, Brott struck a cautious note about producing opera in Hamilton Place.

"We want to make sure that whatever we build doesn't fail like the last one did," said Brott in an obvious reference to Opera Hamilton. "We are operating in a time and era where we really need the support of everybody who loves opera. We recognize that, in a sense, a lot of people have been burned in the process of not getting their tickets or not getting the subscriptions they paid for, and people not getting paid, and people loosing money who were on the board, all kinds of bad blood, if you will, around. And yet there's nothing wrong with the art form itself. We just have to be absolutely careful that we put one foot in front of the other and know where we're going and not disappoint anyone. We've not disappointed anyone for 29 years and we don't intend to start now."

Tickets can be ordered through the Brott Festival box office at 905-525-7664 or online from Monday, April 11 onwards at www.brottmusic.com.

Leonard Turnevicius writes on classical music for The Hamilton Spectator.

leonardturnevicius@gmail.com

Brott Music Festival announces 2016 season

Brantford venue and possibility of full Hamilton Place opera part of 2016 season

WhatsOn Apr 09, 2016 by Leonard Turnevicius Hamilton Spectator

Taking in the opening concert of the Brott Music Festival this June? Well, heigh-ho, heigh-ho, it's off to Brantford you go.

That's right, according to a Brott Festival press release, the 2016 season opens on Wednesday, June 22 in Brantford's Sanderson Centre for the Performing Arts with Jonathan Crow soloing in Tchaikovsky's "Violin Concerto" accompanied by Brott and his National Academy Orchestra. Robert Rival's "Overture" and Rimsky-Korsakov's "Scheherazade" fill out the bill.

"We couldn't find the right hall and we also wanted very much to, kind of, extend ourselves in other areas, and Brantford has a beautiful concert hall, and we thought we might like to try to do that," said Brott from his Hamilton home. "There's only so much we can put into Hamilton and have people come week after week after week. And so, we felt we needed to spread our wings a little bit, and Brantford seems like a logical place."

The following week, on June 30, Brott and his 50 NAO apprentices plus a handful of mentors flutter over to Waterdown's St. Thomas the Apostle Church for Beethoven's "Ninth Symphony" with vocal soloists Leslie Fagan, Mia Lennox, Michael Colvin, and James Westman.

The remaining concerts are being held in various venues, typical of festivals past. Mohawk College's McIntyre Performing Arts Centre will see PopOpera (July 7) and a staged performance of Mozart's opera, "Le Nozze di Figaro" (July 14), An Evening with John Williams (July 28), the Music of Led Zeppelin with Jeans 'n' Classics (August 5), From Tchaikovsky to Ravel with pianist Sara Davis Buechner (August 11), and Verdi's "Requiem" (August 18). Soprano-comedienne Natalie Choquette appears at Ancaster's Fieldcote Memorial Park (July 10), Ancaster-based pianist Valerie Tryon performs in Ancaster's St. John's Anglican (July 17), the Classic Blend Ladies' Barbershop Chorus harmonizes at Hamilton's Zoetic Theatre (July 23), and Chris Jason celebrates 100 Years of Frank Sinatra at LIUNA Station (August 12). Brott and crew will undertake two run-outs. The first, a Last Night of the Proms show with the aforementioned Mr. Crow in Toronto's Koerner Hall (August 3), the second, a concert with pianists Janina Fialkowska, James Anagnoson and Leslie Kinton at the Festival of the Sound in Parry Sound (August 7).

The press release also listed a performance of Puccini's opera "La bohème" slated for Hamilton Place on October 1, but gave no further details.

So, is "Bohème" a go?

"It's a go if the city council comes up with the money that we need in order to make it possible. It's that simple," said Brott. "We were able to get a project grant from the Canada Council. They (Canada Council and the Ontario Arts Council) basically want to see that the city, the locale is behind it in terms of sponsorship and in terms of civic funds. So, if we get the funding, we go ahead. Meanwhile we have hired everybody pro tem. That is to say, we've hired everybody with the understanding that if we don't get the money we won't go ahead."

When asked how much was being asked from the city, Brott answered, "Two hundred thousand dollars."

When Opera Hamilton/Opera Ontario was operational, a production would typically run in the neighbourhood of $300,000.

"We will probably be able to pull it in for less than that," surmised Brott. "We're pulling in a lot of favours. You can't do that all the time. I know for example that IATSE (International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees) has offered to give us a grant. Everywhere I go, I'm very encouraged we'll be able to make it work. We're expecting that we'll hear from the city, I'd say, within a month, no later than within a month. It's still not 100 per cent, but I think all indicators are favourable."

That said, Brott struck a cautious note about producing opera in Hamilton Place.

"We want to make sure that whatever we build doesn't fail like the last one did," said Brott in an obvious reference to Opera Hamilton. "We are operating in a time and era where we really need the support of everybody who loves opera. We recognize that, in a sense, a lot of people have been burned in the process of not getting their tickets or not getting the subscriptions they paid for, and people not getting paid, and people loosing money who were on the board, all kinds of bad blood, if you will, around. And yet there's nothing wrong with the art form itself. We just have to be absolutely careful that we put one foot in front of the other and know where we're going and not disappoint anyone. We've not disappointed anyone for 29 years and we don't intend to start now."

Tickets can be ordered through the Brott Festival box office at 905-525-7664 or online from Monday, April 11 onwards at www.brottmusic.com.

Leonard Turnevicius writes on classical music for The Hamilton Spectator.

leonardturnevicius@gmail.com