FAITH MATTERS: The longest night

WhatsOn Nov 14, 2017 by Rev. Deacon Paul Bates Grace Anglican Church Waterdown Flamborough Review

An earthly event precedes Christmas: the winter solstice, the longest night of the year. This year, the winter solstice occurs on Dec. 21.

For many, however, Christmas night, itself, is the longest night. Christmas, which for Christians around the world is a joyous time of anticipation, a time when families look forward to time together for meals, sharing of gifts and worship, can for some bring deep pain.

Rosemary Morgan, a devout Christian, in her book, Living With Infertility: A Christian Perspective, writes about the pain that she feels at times like advent and Christmas.

She writes, “I’m just furious all the time” and “my mother-in-law rang up to tell me that yet another cousin was pregnant and I threw the ‘phone across the room. It hit the wall and smashed into pieces. Now I have no baby and a broken ‘phone.”

In his book, The Roots of Sorrow: A Pastoral Theology of Suffering, my colleague, Dr. Phil Zylla writes, “Acute suffering breaks down the inner confidence that we may have in life, leaving us feeling vulnerable.” It is evident throughout this book that Morgan is describing a deep sorrow. A sorrow for which she can find no explanation. A sorrow that brings a sense of being completely outside the experiences of her community. It seems that in the depth of her struggle, Morgan turns to the enduring presence of the Holy Spirit, who dwells in all who have faith. She writes most profoundly, “The Holy Spirit will intercede with us: if we run out of words to pray, the Holy Spirit will pray for us. If we cannot express our pain and sorrow, we can just sit in God’s presence and the Holy Spirit will speak through our groans, our tears and even our silence (Rom 8:26). We can sit with God, with or without words, and know that he is fully in tune with us.”

If you have, or know someone that has similar sorrow, fear, or anxiety at this time, please consider our Longest Night Service on Dec. 19 at 2 p.m., followed by refreshments.


FAITH MATTERS: The longest night

WhatsOn Nov 14, 2017 by Rev. Deacon Paul Bates Grace Anglican Church Waterdown Flamborough Review

An earthly event precedes Christmas: the winter solstice, the longest night of the year. This year, the winter solstice occurs on Dec. 21.

For many, however, Christmas night, itself, is the longest night. Christmas, which for Christians around the world is a joyous time of anticipation, a time when families look forward to time together for meals, sharing of gifts and worship, can for some bring deep pain.

Rosemary Morgan, a devout Christian, in her book, Living With Infertility: A Christian Perspective, writes about the pain that she feels at times like advent and Christmas.

She writes, “I’m just furious all the time” and “my mother-in-law rang up to tell me that yet another cousin was pregnant and I threw the ‘phone across the room. It hit the wall and smashed into pieces. Now I have no baby and a broken ‘phone.”

In his book, The Roots of Sorrow: A Pastoral Theology of Suffering, my colleague, Dr. Phil Zylla writes, “Acute suffering breaks down the inner confidence that we may have in life, leaving us feeling vulnerable.” It is evident throughout this book that Morgan is describing a deep sorrow. A sorrow for which she can find no explanation. A sorrow that brings a sense of being completely outside the experiences of her community. It seems that in the depth of her struggle, Morgan turns to the enduring presence of the Holy Spirit, who dwells in all who have faith. She writes most profoundly, “The Holy Spirit will intercede with us: if we run out of words to pray, the Holy Spirit will pray for us. If we cannot express our pain and sorrow, we can just sit in God’s presence and the Holy Spirit will speak through our groans, our tears and even our silence (Rom 8:26). We can sit with God, with or without words, and know that he is fully in tune with us.”

If you have, or know someone that has similar sorrow, fear, or anxiety at this time, please consider our Longest Night Service on Dec. 19 at 2 p.m., followed by refreshments.


FAITH MATTERS: The longest night

WhatsOn Nov 14, 2017 by Rev. Deacon Paul Bates Grace Anglican Church Waterdown Flamborough Review

An earthly event precedes Christmas: the winter solstice, the longest night of the year. This year, the winter solstice occurs on Dec. 21.

For many, however, Christmas night, itself, is the longest night. Christmas, which for Christians around the world is a joyous time of anticipation, a time when families look forward to time together for meals, sharing of gifts and worship, can for some bring deep pain.

Rosemary Morgan, a devout Christian, in her book, Living With Infertility: A Christian Perspective, writes about the pain that she feels at times like advent and Christmas.

She writes, “I’m just furious all the time” and “my mother-in-law rang up to tell me that yet another cousin was pregnant and I threw the ‘phone across the room. It hit the wall and smashed into pieces. Now I have no baby and a broken ‘phone.”

In his book, The Roots of Sorrow: A Pastoral Theology of Suffering, my colleague, Dr. Phil Zylla writes, “Acute suffering breaks down the inner confidence that we may have in life, leaving us feeling vulnerable.” It is evident throughout this book that Morgan is describing a deep sorrow. A sorrow for which she can find no explanation. A sorrow that brings a sense of being completely outside the experiences of her community. It seems that in the depth of her struggle, Morgan turns to the enduring presence of the Holy Spirit, who dwells in all who have faith. She writes most profoundly, “The Holy Spirit will intercede with us: if we run out of words to pray, the Holy Spirit will pray for us. If we cannot express our pain and sorrow, we can just sit in God’s presence and the Holy Spirit will speak through our groans, our tears and even our silence (Rom 8:26). We can sit with God, with or without words, and know that he is fully in tune with us.”

If you have, or know someone that has similar sorrow, fear, or anxiety at this time, please consider our Longest Night Service on Dec. 19 at 2 p.m., followed by refreshments.